Tax Reform Bill Could Impact University of Evansville Endowment

first_imgDECEMBER 17TH, 2017  BRITNEY TAYLOR EVANSVILLE, INDIANA Lawmakers in Washington D.C. are still wrestling with the details of the new tax reform bill, some of which could have a negative impact on higher education.The bill proposes a 1.4% excise tax on endowments, which would affect scholarships for many students.Schools with an endowment of $250,000 per part-time student and $500,000 per full-time student would be affected.Although the endowment at UE isn’t high enough to be affected, officials say the future is still a concern.Donna Teague said, “We would hope that our lawmakers would see that, and make the right decisions to help higher ed and our students because as you know, higher education is very important. It’s important that students get a degree to help them in the future. So we need to try to make higher ed as affordable as possible.”Kentucky Wesleyan’s endowment is also not high enough to be affected.Negotiations on the new tax reform bill are still ongoing.Britney TaylorWeb ProducerMore Posts – Website FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Marsha Abell Barnhart Calls Commissioner Cheryl Musgrave An Out and Out Liar

first_img FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Posted below are comments made by former County Commissioner Marsha Abell Barnhart concerning a statement made by Commissioner Cheryl Musgrave about the hiring of the former Director of Burdette Park.  Marsha Abell Barnhart comments about Mrs Musgrave was posted on her Facebook page.  We asked and received permission from Marsha Abell Barnhart to post her Facebook page comments in the CCO.  We post her comments about Commissioner Musgrave without bias, opinon or editing. You can also click the blue headline below and it shall take you directly to Mrs. Barnhart Facebook page.Marsha Abell Barnhart Calls Cheryl Musgrave An Out And Out Liar  No words are to be withheld. Cheryl Musgrave as an out and out liar. She knows nothing about how the Burdette Parks Director was hired because she was not on the commission. She was out trying to start trouble somewhere else then. I, however, was a commissioner with the Honorable Stephen Melcher and the Honorable Joe Kiefer. All three of us interviewed Mr. Murphy and I checked on him with my contacts in Louisville. We were lucky to be able to hire him. Musgrave has botched this entire issue and now says it was the previous commissioners. She has lied so much she can’t determine what is true and what is not. And she will throw anyone under the bus to get what she wants. Too bad the State of Indiana didn’t want her so we got her back.last_img read more

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CITY COUNCIL CAPITAL PLAN WORKSHOP on 1/24 from 7-9PM at OC Free Public Library

first_imgPENDING BUSINESS NEW BUSINESS CITIZEN COMMENT – ANY TOPICADJOURNMENT CITY COUNCIL WORKSHOP AGENDATUESDAY, JANUARY 24, 20177:00 PM – 9:00 PM OC FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 17th STREET ENTRANCE LECTURE HALL, ROOM N110 CALL TO ORDERPLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE AND MOMENT OF PRAYERROLL CALLOPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACTAdequate notice of this meeting has been given pursuant to Public Law 1975, Chapter 231.CELL PHONE ANNOUNCEMENT                                                               5 YEAR CAPITAL PLAN PRESENTATION(2017-2021)center_img Ocean City Free Public Librarylast_img read more

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Phil Collins Announces First North American Tour In More Than A Decade

first_imgLegendary British rock drummer, singer, songwriter, and bandleader Phil Collins has announced that he will mount a major tour of North America for the first time in twelve years. The 15-date tour, billed as “Phil Collins: Not Dead Yet, Live!,” will see Collins play arena dates in major markets across the U.S. throughout October, in addition to dates in Montreal and Toronto. The run comes as a continuation of his 2017 and 2018 “Not Dead Yet Tour,” which saw the former Genesis drummer/vocalist play a number of dates in the U.K., Western Europe, and South America, in addition to recent dates in Mexico and Puerto Rico.The backing band for the limited North American engagement will include longtime touring guitarist Daryl Stuermer, keyboardist Brad Cole, bassist Leland Sklar, percussionist Luis Conte, and Phil’s 16-year-old son, Nicolas Collins, on drums. The band will also feature a horn section and backup vocalists. The tour’s title comes on the heels of Collins’ recently-released memoirs, Not Dead Yet: The Memoir.Tickets for the shows go on sale May 15 for the general public at 10 a.m., preceded by a presale for Citi cardholders this Friday, May 11. You can check out a full list of Phil Collins’ North American tour dates below. For more information, head over to Phil’s website.Phil Collins: Not Dead Yet, Live! North American DatesOct. 05 – Ft. Lauderdale, FL – BB&T CenterOct. 07 – Washington, DC – Capital One ArenaOct. 08 – Philadelphia, PA – Wells Fargo CenterOct. 09 – Boston, MA – TD GardenOct. 11 – Toronto, ON – Air Canada CentreOct. 13 – Newark, NJ – Prudential CenterOct. 14 – Brooklyn, NY – Barclays CenterOct. 16 – Montreal, QC – Centre BellOct. 18 – Cleveland, OH – Quicken Loans ArenaOct 19 – Columbus, OH – Nationwide ArenaOct. 21 – Minneapolis, MN – Target CenterOct. 22 – Chicago, IL – United CenterOct. 25 – Oakland, CA – Oracle ArenaOct. 27 – Las Vegas, NV – MGM Grand Garden ArenaOct. 28 – Los Angeles, CA – The ForumView All Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Limitations on the undocumented

first_img Affirming whole-person admissions Related Universities can continue considering racial and ethnic background as a factor in evaluating applicants, Supreme Court rules A deadlocked Supreme Court dealt a major blow to President Obama’s executive actions to grant relief from deportation to nearly 5 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States. The 4-4 tie in U.S. v. Texas, a challenge by that state and 25 others against Obama’s executive actions, leaves in place an injunction by a lower court that blocked the government from implementing two programs that would protect both children and their parents from deportation.“I’m disappointed,” said Deborah Anker, clinical professor of law and director of the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program at Harvard Law School. “What this means is that it puts hundreds of thousands of people at risk of deportation, including parents of U.S. citizens or legal residents.”What it means legally is that after the court’s one-sentence decision, which mentioned “an equally divided court,” it is up to the presiding judge in Brownsville, Texas, to decide whether or not to go forward with a trial. “The decision on the merits of the case are still going to be litigated,” she said. “The decision by the Supreme Court is not an affirmation of either position.”Phil Torrey, lecturer on law with the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program and the supervising attorney for the Harvard Immigration Project, hopes the ruling will help galvanize the movement for immigration reform.“Hopefully it will continue to energize the movement to push for comprehensive reform, especially with elections coming forward,” he said.The two Obama programs are an expansion of the 2012 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA), which help parents remain in the country and obtain work permits.Opponents who challenged Obama in the courts argued he overstepped his constitutional powers by issuing the executive actions, bypassing Congress. Republican governors lead the 26 states that sued the government.The decision by the Supreme Court will likely fuel the acrimonious debate on immigration reform, which has intensified as the national election campaigns continue.last_img read more

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Odds & Ends: James Corden & The History Boys Join Maggie Smith in Van & More

first_img Women Speak Up on Halloween On the subject of upcoming holidays, young writers from around the world have collaborated to create the play Women Speak/World Listen. The one night only production will take place on October 31 at NYC’s 4th Street Theatre and is a multi-media exploration of the lives of 13 young women coming-of-age in the midst of chaos and conflict. Food for thought this Halloween. Bad Jews is London-Bound After conquering off-Broadway and the U.K.’s city of Bath, those Bad Jews are moving to London. Joshua Harmon’s acclaimed show will play January 15, 2015 through February 28 at the St. James Theatre. Opening night is set for January 21. Directed by Michael Longhurst, the comedy’s original Bath cast will reprise their roles in London, with Jenna Augen as Daphna, Gina Bramhill as Melody, Joe Coen as Jonah and Ilan Goodman as Liam. Victor Garber Books Recurring Role on The Flash Broadway favorite Victor Garber has boarded the cast of The CW’s The Flash. According to The Wrap, his recurring role as DC Comics character Dr. Martin Stein will begin in the 12th Episode. We can’t wait to see if Garber and Andy Mientus’ Pied Piper will end up sharing screen time. Rent Writer Turns to Santa Stephen Chbosky, whose writing credits include The Perks of Being a Wallflower and the screenplay to Rent, will direct the movie musical Santa Is Real. Deadline reports that Larry Stuckey will pen the film, which follows the man who plays Santa in Radio City’s Christmas Spectacular.  All in all a handy reminder that it’s time to book our Rockettes tickets—Christmas wouldn’t be Christmas without them!center_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. James Corden & The History Boys Join Maggie Smith in Van Tony winner James Corden, Dominic Cooper, Samuel Anderson and Frances de la Tour will appear opposite the previously announced Tony winner Maggie Smith in the film adaptation of Alan Bennett’s The Lady in the Van, reports the Daily Mail. All four of the project’s newcomers co-starred in Bennett’s The History Boys in London, on Broadway and on screen. View Commentslast_img read more

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Gardening In Georgia

first_imgUniversity of Georgia The final episode of “Gardening in Georgia with Walter Reeves” will air on Georgia Public Broadcasting stations Oct. 10 at 12:30 p.m. and again at 6 p.m.For 10 years, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Georgia Public Broadcasting provided the show for Georgia viewers to get the latest in gardening advice and research. But fans shouldn’t fret. Show host Walter Reeves will be back next season with “Your Southern Garden.” Produced by CAES and University of Florida Extension, the show will include experts and gardeners from across Georgia and north Florida.“Our tenth anniversary seems like a good time to venture into a new phase of garden education,” Reeves said. “’Your Southern Garden’ broadens our reach and the exciting new material we can cover.”The last “Gardening in Georgia” will finish its run with an exotic flair. They are so beautiful and alluring smugglers risk their lives to steal and sell them on the black market. On the Oct. 10 episode, Becky Brinkman, curator of orchids at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, will bring Reeves several rare and exotic orchids and explain where they live and how they can be grown indoors.They look like warts on the pecan leaves, but pecan phylloxera galls are actually the handiwork of insects. Reeves will give his official prescription for treatment.When you are cleaning house, don’t forget the houseplants. Their leaves can collect dust just like countertops. All you need to do the job is a clean white sock.It’s beautiful, but bamboo can be quite rambunctious in the wrong place. Bamboo expert Alexis Caffre shows Reeves several ways to control the unruly plant in the landscape.“Gardening in Georgia” has been produced by the CAES and supported by a gift from McCorkle Nurseries. Learn more about the show and download useful publications at the Web site www.gardeningingeorgia.com.last_img read more

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Georgia MarketMaker

first_imgIn 2001, the Wills family began selling loaves of all-natural bread to friends in the north Georgia mountains. To grow their business, in 2008, they turned to a marketing tool developed by the University of Georgia. Now, they can’t keep up with demand. “Within a month, contacts starting coming in,” said Bruce Wills, who owns My Daily Bread. “Markets starting contacting us, wanting to sell our bread.” Wills registered the business on Georgia MarketMaker, UGA’s online interactive mapping system that connects consumers with markets and businesses that make agricultural products in Georgia. “There has been an explosion in the concept of locally grown, locally manufactured,” Wills said. “MarketMaker as a tool to make businesses like ours known is a great resource. It’s a good publicity tool, and free help. UGA has been very, very good to us.”The family-run business sells hand-rolled loaves of bread made with fresh-ground wheat and locally-harvested honey. Currently, the company can produce 50 loaves a day. The family is considering an expansion to keep up with demand. Grocery store chains and restaurants have contracted with the company for their baked goods. And, a North Georgia businessman contacted the company for specialty holiday gift boxes. “He inquired about sending gift boxes of our products all over the United States,” said Dabrielle Wills. “I actually thought it was a prank call as he had never had our products and wanted gift boxes much larger than we offered. When I asked how he had heard of us, he told us he had found us on MarketMaker!” MarketMakerGeorgia MarketMaker allows producers to list their businesses, products and links to their websites in a searchable database. And, there’s no charge. The website also provides producers with pricing information, consumer demographics, and contact information for potential processors, wholesalers and retailers of specialty food products, said Sharon Kane, a food business development specialist with the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development.“Anyone with a food-related business should register their business on Georgia MarketMaker,” Kane said. “It is a free resource for businesses and consumers.” Last year, the site averaged 75,000 web hits, or page views, per month. Consumers can search for Georgia food products based on different characteristics. They can also find local pick-your-own farms, specialty products sold by local vendors or a list of the 139 farmers markets in the state. The site features 35,000 Georgia food-related businesses and more than 450 producers/farmers.UGA recently won a National Institute of Food and Agriculture award for its work with MarketMaker. Visit Georgia MarketMaker at www.marketmaker.uga.edu. Local food forecastLocally grown foods will be the top topic at the 2011 Ag Forecast, where speakers will talk about what has made their locally grown businesses successful. A keynote speaker will give a broad view on the locally grown trend. UGA agricultural economists will give their annual economic outlook for agriculture and agribusinesses in Georgia, too. The meetings will be held January 24 in Gainesville at the Georgia Mountains Center; January 25 in Tifton at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center; January 27 in Statesboro at the Nessmith-Lane Center; February 9 in Carrollton at the Carrol County Ag Center; and February 10 in Macon at Georgia Farm Bureau. For more information and to register, visit www.georgiaagforecast.com.last_img read more

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International Ag Celebration

first_imgSince its inception in 2007, breeders at the West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI) in Ghana have produced 23 new varieties of corn, seven new varieties of peanuts, 11 new varieties of rice and seven new varieties of sweet potato.But the center’s most meaningful contribution to the future of African agriculture and food security are the 66 new doctorates in plant breeding the institution has trained in that time, said Eric Danquah, a plant breeder who founded the center at the University of Ghana.“(This collection of new varieties) is the outcome of training Africans in Africa to work with African crops for Africa,” Danquah, told a crowd gathered Wednesday at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ annual International Agriculture Day celebration.Danquah attended graduate school in plant breeding at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom before returning to Ghana to teach and conduct research. He was continuously saddened, he said, by the fact that the brightest students that he taught at the University of Ghana would leave for graduate school and not return home to work.Losing great scientists to universities in America or Europe often meant that crops important to African farmers were not given the same attention in plant breeding programs. Scientists working in Africa are more aware of the trials faced by farmers on the continent and what kinds of seeds would do well in the African market.Danquah knew “a green revolution for Africa” wouldn’t be possible without researchers working in Africa with easy access to African crops and African farms.“In a number of places, you just don’t find the needed critical mass of scientists,” he said.Without the scientific community as a bedrock, private seed companies don’t consider large investments for commercialization infrastructure, and funding agencies are less likely to award research grants, Danquah said, adding that the scientific community being created through WACCI is one of the most important catalysts for agricultural development in Africa.“What is important about our program is that they’ve all gone back to their home institutions,” Danquah said. “We are building capacity in Africa for Africa.” He encouraged students and researchers at UGA to visit the University of Ghana to study or collaborate. For more information about WACCI, visit wacci.ug.edu.gh.In addition to Danquah’s talk, students and faculty at the celebration heard from 2019 CAES graduate Sarah Spradlin, who will receive degrees in agriscience and environmental systems and international affairs and the CAES Certificate in International Agriculture. She spoke about her time interning on the farm that serves UGA’s campus in Costa Rica. Those gathered also recognized this year’s winners of the CAES Agriculture Abroad Photo Contest.Dung Tran, a doctoral student in the CAES Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics won first place with her photo, “Happy H’Mong Farmer in the Corn Field.” Tran, who worked in plant conservation in Vietnam, took the photo on a seed collecting trip.Each family in this region of the country grows their own heirloom corn variety, Tran said. Tran met the farmer in the photo when she took Tran into her family’s field to collect seeds from her family’s variety of sticky corn.Other students recognized in the photo contest were Sujata Bogati, master’s degree student in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, with her second-place photo, “Agriculture in the Mountain Regions,” and Lauren Rutledge, an undergraduate student in the Department of Animal and Dairy Science, with her third-place photo, “Cacao? More like CaWOW!”The celebration was also a time to honor scholarship award winners and 2019 Certificate of International Agriculture graduates.Recipients of the 2019 Certificate of International Agriculture included:Alexandra Bull, bachelor’s degree in environmental economics and management, minors in environmental law and resource economics, and certificates in sustainability and international agricultureGrant Freeman, bachelor’s degree in biological sciences and minor in horticultureAbigail Pierce, bachelor’s degree in agricultural communication and certificates in local food systems and international agricultureSarah Spradlin, bachelor’s degrees in international affairs and agriscience and environmental systemsAshley Stone, master’s degree in natural resourcesMallory Warren, bachelor’s degree in environmental economics and management, minor in anthropology, and certificates in organic agriculture, sustainability and international agricultureRecipients of travel scholarships included:Virginia Childs, Kanemasu Global Engagement Award, bachelor’s degree student in food scienceThomas Woldu Assefa, Graduate International Travel Award, doctoral candidate in agricultural and applied economicsMatthew Aaron Bruce, Graduate International Travel Award, master’s degree student in crop and soil sciencesRachel Hampton, Graduate International Travel Award, master’s degree student in animal and dairy scienceAmelia Lovelace, Graduate International Travel Award, doctoral candidate in plant pathologyConnie Mou, Graduate International Travel Award, doctoral candidate in poultry sciencePietro Mendonca de Santis Sica; Global Food Security International Travel Scholarship, master’s degree student in crop and soil sciencesMaddison Holder, Veloso Wallick Graduate Scholarship, master’s degree student in agricultural and environmental educationSadie Lackey, Wen Willams International Travel Scholarship, bachelor’s degree student in agricultural communicationJacqueline Kessler, Broder-Ackerman Global Citizen Award, bachelor’s degree student in environmental and managementFor more information about CAES international collaboration and opportunities for CAES students to study and work abroad, visit global.uga.edu.For more photos from the event visit www.flickr.com.last_img read more

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Your New Base Camp

first_imgThe Appalachian Teardrop and Sylvan Sport Go bring back the tow-behind.A tent is a perfectly suitable “home away from home,” but if you really want to lay claim to a patch of dirt in the middle of nowhere, plant your flag with a tow-behind trailer. Two Southern companies are making trailers for the adventure-minded traveler. They’re lightweight, small, and packed with amenities that will make your next weekend in the woods more civilized. These aren’t your grandpa’s campers.Sylvan Sport GoConsider the Go a pop-up camper, completely reinvented. This all-aluminum pop-up doubles as a trailer that can carry 800 pounds of bikes, kayaks, surfboards…then transforms into a hard-topped tent that can sleep up to four people in a variety of configurations. You can also convert the beds into tables. The whole package is ridiculously spacious thanks to the bump-out style tents, but you won’t get the built in stove and cooler of the Teardrop. And you’ve got some set up once you get to camp. The roof cranks up, but you’ve still got to erect the tent. But it’s hard to beat the rugged versatility of this pop-up.$8,000; sylvansport.comAppalachian TeardropBuilt in Charlotte, N.C., this is a modern take on the sleek tow-behinds that were so popular in the 50s. The beauty of a teardrop-style trailer is there’s no set up once you find your base camp. Simply park it and enjoy. Much like its predecessors, the Appalachian Teardrop is light enough to be towed by a small vehicle. Check out the Rover model, a 920-pound trailer that sleeps two and features a built-in two-burner stove, cooler, stereo, and storage area. All of that happens outside of the Teardop, as the interior is just big enough for sleeping.$9,995; appalachianteardrop.comlast_img read more

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