Post Doctoral Research Position

first_imgPost-doctoral research position in Division of CardiologyUniversity of Maryland, Baltimore (180000QW)A full time Post-Doctoral research position is available in thelaboratory of Dr. Charles Hong in the Division of Cardiology at theUniversity of Maryland-Baltimore. MD, PhD or MD/PhD scientist issought to join a laboratory at the forefront of academic drugdiscovery and cardiovascular biology. The Hong laboratory hasidentified a class of small molecules that ameliorate muscle damagein a Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) mouse model and adversecardiac remodeling following myocardial injury. An ambitious andcreative Ph.D. or M.D. scientist is sought to determine themechanism of their action.Qualifications :Applicants are required to have a Ph.D. or M.D. and expertise intechniques of cell and molecular biology. The post-doc will leadthe project, which use mouse models of myocardial infarction andmuscular dystrophy. Prior experience with mouse disease models,immunobiology, tissue immunohistochemistry and cardiac or skeletalmuscle physiology are highly valued.If interested, please email a CV, a short statement of researchinterests, and the names and contact information for threereferences to Charles Hong, MD, PhD atEmail: [email protected] University of Maryland is an Equal Opportunity Employer encouragingexcellence through diversity. Qualified woman and minoritycandidates are encouraged to apply.last_img read more

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Final “Gary’s Ride” Marks 10 Year Anniversary of ISP Lt. Gary Dudley’s Death

first_img“GARY’S RIDE” is a recreational bicycle ride to honor Indiana State                        Police Lt. Gary Dudley.  All proceeds from the ride benefit The Gary                        Dudley Memorial Scholarship Foundation, which provides college                        scholarships to the children of Police Officers killed in the Line of                                  Duty in Indiana.  To date, over $180,000 is scholarships have been                          awarded.       On-line registration is available at: www.getmeregistered.com.  For                          information about this event, please go to www.garysride.com                         Day of registration will be available                         Please direct any questions to Carolyn Dudley at:                          [email protected]         Saturday, August 13, 2016   Registration is from                         7:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., with an open start                        This will be our 10th and FINAL GARY’S RIDE             Bicyclists of all ages and experience levels are welcome.  Routes range                        from a “Family Fun Ride” (0-10 miles) up to a Century (100 miles).                         Six distance levels are available.  You can ride as little or as much as                         you want.  Helmets are required.center_img EVENTS:      In addition to the ride, there will be activities for kids of all ages to enjoy at the ILEA, including a large display of Police, Fire, & EMS vehicles and equipment.  The displays are free and open to the public and are available from 9:00a.m. until 12:00p.m.Registration PDF Form is AttachedAbout Gary Dudley:Hometown: Indianapolis, IndianaAppointed to Indiana State Police: December 14, 1979District: Headquarters – Commander Indiana State Police Training AcademyBorn April 7, 1955, Died August 22, 2006While participating in a bicycle ride to honor fallen police officers, Lieutenant Gary Dudley and retired Lake County Sheriff’s Department Chief of Police Gary Martin were killed when a box truck struck the riders’ support vehicle shoving the support vehicle into the group of cyclists. Lieutenant Dudley and Chief Martin died at the scene of the crash on State Road 63 in Vermillion County. A third cyclist, retired Indianapolis Police Officer Spencer Moore was injured in the crash.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare        Indiana Law Enforcement Academy in Plainfield, IN 5402 Sugar Grove Rd, Plainfield, IN 46168last_img read more

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Halloween Trick-or-Treating in Ocean City for 2015

first_imgHere are details for Halloween trick-or-treat hours in Ocean City, NJ on Oct. 31, 2015:TRICK-OR-TREAT IN DOWNTOWN OCEAN CITY: Participating stores will welcome trick-or-treaters 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 31, on Asbury Avenue between Sixth Street and 11th Street. Sponsored by the Downtown Merchants Association.CITYWIDE TRICK-OR-TREATING: Traditional Halloween trick-or-treating hours will be Oct. 31 from 5 to 8 p.m. Children should be accompanied by adults and wear fire proof costumes that provide good visibility.last_img read more

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“Kookie Kids” Helping Local Families

first_imgKookie Kids volunteer Sydney Chin, 10, of Ocean City, helps Jen Bowman decorate some holiday cookies at St. Peter’s United Methodist Church. Proceeds of sales will go to helping families in need. (Photos courtesy Jen Bowman) By MADDY VITALEWhen Katie Bowman, of Ocean City, started Kookie Kids “Kids Helping Kids” five years ago, she was just 13.Katie, her mother, Jen, and sister, Kelsea, 15, along with other volunteers, bake cookies in the St. Peter’s United Methodist Church kitchen.Baking countless butter cookies during several sessions since the summer isn’t just something fun to do.Kookie Kids volunteers sell the confections at the Ocean City’s Farmers Market on Wednesdays during the summer and out of the church as well as take orders on the phone. All of the proceeds go to helping families in need.Butter cookies in all shapes and sizes are on sale with proceeds going to a good cause.Kookie Kids is a charitable foundation run by kids helping kids. The Bowmans and other volunteers packaged cookies to go with dinners supplied by St. Peter’s Church for Thanksgiving and for other organizations feeding people in need.“One hundred percent of the proceeds go to help local children. In the past five years that the kids have been baking and selling, they have given over $10,000 to local children and organizations,” Jen said.This year, however, the need is greater due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Some families are struggling financially because of job loss. Others are medical workers who Kookie Kids wanted to do something nice for and some are just having a tough time making ends meet, Katie explained.In those cases, Katie said, Kookie Kids cookie sale proceeds will go to purchasing gifts for families to help make their Christmases brighter. One of the goals is to buy some local children bicycles.While social distancing prevented Kookie Kids from having more volunteers, the team of seven couldn’t even work together due to safety guidelines. The cookies were baked in many shifts because of the pandemic restrictions.Katie Bowman, 18, cuts out the cookies in 2019.Katie said her sister, Kelsea, really jumped in to help and has always been a big part of the organization, too.“She helped me out more recently with me having sports and stuff, so she has been right there with me,” said Katie, who played on the Ocean City High School field hockey team this fall.“Over the summer we did less baking because school was closed and the church was closed,” Katie noted. “The church did open up for us but we did not have as many volunteers because of COVID. We focused more on the giving back aspect.”Even while the pandemic surged over the months, Katie said she and her family and the volunteers did what they could to bake in the church kitchen, which is certified by the Board of Health.“When we were in quarantine for the holidays, we were making more cookies to give out and adding them to the meals we were giving to the homeless,” Katie added. “Anything with giving out meals we know of we donate to.”On Christmas Eve they are going to be delivering meals to Wesley by the Bay and in each entrée there will be some tasty confections courtesy Kookie Kids, she said.Sydney Chin, 10, of Ocean City, decorates gingerbread cookies.Sydney Chin, an Ocean City fifth-grader, began helping out with Kookie Kids in the summer.On Friday, Dec. 11, Sydney came in to the church kitchen to decorate the gingerbread cookies.“She is very creative,” Jen said.Sydney, 10, said she enjoys helping.“It is good because I can take out my artistic side and help the church,” she said.Her mother, Jill Kozakowski, said it was particularly special for her daughter to be able to help out with Kookie Kids over the summer.“She started mainly this summer. She would go in on Tuesdays and bake and then Wednesdays she would sell the cookies at the Farmers Market,” Kozakowski said. “It was nice for Sydney to be able to go help and also be creative.”There is a limited supply of Kookie Kids butter cookies. St Peter’s Church is open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday-Friday. A one pound box of cookies is $20 and a half pound box is $10.For more information or to order a box of cookies, call St. Peter’s United Methodist Church at 609-399-2988.Cookies are displayed for purchase at St. Peter’s Church or people may call to place an order.last_img read more

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Meet New Dell Technologies IoT GM Ray O’Farrell

first_imgAt Dell Technologies we have a vision for how the new world of IoT comes together – how our businesses can help drive human progress by transforming IoT into IQT or the IQ of Things.To enable this vision, we unveiled a new IoT division that will help our customers navigate across all the Dell Technologies’ brands. This new IoT division will be led by VMware CTO Ray O’Farrell, and I caught up with him just before today’s event to ask what it means for him and his teams at Dell and VMware.Congratulations on your new role. How has your work as VMware’s CTO prepared you for it?While I am currently the VMware CTO, most of my time at VMware was spent running product development teams and this has required me to partner closely with customers and leverage a broad ecosystem as we take products to market. As CTO, one of my main focus areas is on long-term technology research, innovation and market trends. I have also been responsible for ensuring VMware’s successful partnerships across the industry with a focus on the Dell Technologies family of businesses. I plan to leverage these these experiences as I take on this additional responsibility of general manager for Dell Technologies’ IoT division.Can you tell us more about your new responsibilities?Our new IoT division will leverage the strength across all of Dell Technologies family of businesses to ensure we deliver the right solution – in combination with our vast partner ecosystem. To prepare for that, I have been working with a small team across Dell Technologies and have been interviewing customers, partners and IoT experts to help build this division.We’ll continue to do research that will help us prepare for building future IoT products and solutions, while also aligning current offerings across the Dell Technologies businesses to deliver unified solutions to our customers and ecosystem.What are you most excited about as you look forward?I am excited about the fourth industrial revolution that we are embarking into. As Jeremy Burton has noted, it’s a revolution that will impact every company in every industry. I’m equally excited to be leading this new Dell Technologies division. Given our rich history in the edge computing market, we have an outstanding opportunity to meet customer needs and help them deploy integrated IoT systems with greater ease.What are the leadership traits the IoT market requires?The most important trait is listening – it is vitally important to understand the business need and impact your customer is trying achieve by leveraging IoT. The second most important trait is spending time with our partners, many IoT solutions are vertical within a given industry requiring you to partner deeply with the experts in that specific field.Get to know another side of O’Farrell by watching the latest edition of our Meet the Leaders video series:last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s students attend women’s conference

first_imgWhen The Daily Beast’s fifth annual “Women in the World” summit kicked off at the Lincoln Center in New York last Thursday, two Saint Mary’s students were in attendance.Juniors Paige DeRouin and Kaitlyn Rabach (Editor’s Note: Rabach served as the former Saint Mary’s Editor for The Observer) witnessed live journalistic storytelling from global men and women on courage, resilience and the need for positive change, Rabach said.“Tina Brown, former editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast, has really been pushing this newfound style of journalism forward,” Rabach said. “It is focused on storytelling and personal experiences. This three-day summit featured women and men from all generations and walks of life.“All the speakers really told a story. The summit gave them a medium to share their voice.”DeRouin and Rabach currently participate in American University’s Washington Semester Program, an exchange where students study and intern in the nation’s capital..Both are working as interns at iLive2Lead, a non-profit organization providing high-level leadership skills to young women from around the world, DeRouin said. Their internship brought them to New York for the conference, she said.“We could not have picked an better internship while studying in D.C.,” DeRouin said. “iLive2Lead is run by three amazing women, and the organization’s mission is to empower young women all over the world.“They have hosted training summits in nations all over the globe and have served women from over 60 countries. Our bosses understand the importance of mentoring, and have worked to mentor Kaitlyn and I throughout our time at the organization. This push for mentorship is what led us to New York. They wanted us to hear these stories from leaders all over the world.”While at the conference, Rabach said she heard discussions on topics related to human rights issues, especially abuses related to women. Former secretary of state Hillary Clinton and the current managing director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Christine Lagarde were two of the conference’s keynote speakers.“Seeing Secretary Clinton and Madame Lagarde speak was beyond incredible,” Rabach said. “I grew up with these women as my role models. It is women like Hillary Clinton and Christine Lagarde that have shaped my views on feminism and social justice.“They are two of the most influential women in the world and I cannot wait to see what the future brings for them. Both are thinking about their next steps right now – Clinton is contemplating a presidential run in the United States, and Lagarde is doing the same for her home country of France.”While at the conference, Rabach said she had the opportunity to personally interview Lagarde and Ambassador Catherine Russell of the Office of Global Women’s Issues in the State Department. Both DeRouin and Rabach were asked to blog about the conference for The Huffington Post and The Daily Beast, DeRouin said.“Not only was I able to hear some of my role models on stage, but I was actually given the opportunity to go backstage and ask them some questions of my own,” Rabach said. “Both Madame Lagarde and Ambassador Russell have taught me so much about what it means to be a woman, especially in today’s society, and I was able to shake their hands, interview them and really see how great of women they are even behind the scenes.”Another focal point of the conference was hearing stories from Syrian refugees and aid workers, DeRouin said.“In the mainstream media, Syria is often forgotten about,” DeRouin said. “The human rights abuses in Syria were brought up throughout the entire conference, and speakers were calling the conflict the biggest humanitarian failure since Rwanda. … In cases of crisis, women and children are affected the most. I really felt a call to action after the conference.”Both women said this experience was a great addition to their four years at Saint Mary’s.“It was great to see women leaders from all over the world talk about relevant issues,” DeRouin said. “The conversations we were able to hear were directly related to what we have been talking about at Saint Mary’s and in D.C. Plus, Saint Mary’s, iLive2Lead and “Women in the World” are all about empowering women and really forming a sisterhood that spans the globe.”Rabach said the conference encouraged her to be a positive force against some of society’s current evils.“Empowering women is not only a moral and philosophical issue, but it is actually an economic issue,” Rabach said. “Madame Lagarde said, ‘empowering women is a no-brainer” and it really is. … At the end of the conference, Tina Brown encouraged us to be ‘change makers’, and I can’t wait to be a change maker for individuals, especially women and girls, all over the globe.”Tags: New York Citylast_img read more

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NY Gov. Signs Bill Guaranteeing Paid Leave For Those Under Quarantine

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) ALBANY- New York’s Governor signed a bill Wednesday night that guarantees paid leave for those placed in mandatory or precautionary quarantine due to the novel Coronavirus outbreak.“I just signed into law legislation to provide immediate relief to working New Yorkers whose lives are being turned upside down by COVID-19,” said New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo in a statement.“No one should have to make the impossible choice between losing their job or providing for their family and going to work, especially during this pandemic,” furthered Gov. Cuomo. “We seek to build upon this effort with guaranteed sick leave for all in this year’s budget.”“In New York we stand with our workers in sickness and in health.” last_img read more

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Pretty pest

first_imgBy Sharon DowdyUniversity of GeorgiaDespite its dainty name, the lace bug can cause major headaches for nurserymen and homeowners across the country. University of Georgia researchers recently identified a species that has never been recorded in Georgia. And, it has taken a liking to ornamental grasses.Over the past three years, UGA entomologist Kris Braman has evaluated ornamental grasses in plots on the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Griffin, Ga., campus. This summer, she and CAES graduate student Evelyn Carr discovered lace bugs on an experimental line of ornamental grass called Pennisetum. Feed on trees and ornamentals, tooLace bugs commonly feed on azaleas, chrysanthemums, cotoneasters and sycamores, Carr said, but not on ornamental grasses.Lace bugs live on the undersides of leaves. When feeding, they stick their mouthparts into the leaf and suck out the cell contents. This causes the top side of the leaf to be discolored with white dots. They can further discolor leaves by laying their eggs on the undersides.“They stress the plant and harm it aesthetically,” Carr said. “So on our ornamental grasses, its damage would be considered very extensive.”Making a big problem biggerLeft unchecked, the tiny pest could have a definite economic impact on the state’s landscape industry. “Ornamental grasses have become a staple in the landscape,” Carr said. “You see them everywhere.” Georgia nurserymen, landscapers and homeowners spend more than $1.7 million annually to control lace bugs on ornamental plants. The pest still causes more than $300,000 in damage each year.To properly identify the new species, they sent a sample to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Systematic Entomology Laboratory in Maryland. It was identified as Leptodictya plana.“This is a species we know very little about,” Carr said. “There’s only been one scientific paper published on it.”Lots to learn about new speciesAs part of her thesis, Carr plans to determine the lace bug’s biology, origin, reproductive traits and more. “The ultimate goal is to determine the best way to control it,” she said. This species is closely related to the sugarcane lace bug which is a huge problem in Hawaii and South America, she said. “It’s normally found in Texas, Mississippi, Arizona and other dry states,” she said. “Dr. Braman hypothesizes that it has increased in Georgia because of the dry weather associated with the drought.”This lace bug species could cause problems in Georgia, but it can benefit some regions, she said.“Out West they are looking at this (lace bug) as a good thing,” Carr said. “It feeds on bufflegrass which is considered a noxious weed there.”Braman and Carr are raising this lace bug species in their laboratories to identify other plants it will feed on.last_img read more

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On the Blogs: Puerto Rico Electricity Crisis Heightens Debate Over Privatization vs. Public Control

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Slate.com:A 2016 report on PREPA commissioned by the Puerto Rican government is scathing. In the latter months of that year, for example, Puerto Ricans experienced four to five times the number of service outages as U.S. customers on average, though they pay the second-highest rates in the U.S. after Hawaii. Instead of investing in preventive maintenance, PREPA operates in a permanent state of triage. Its budget is “opaque and discretionary.” Record keeping is “subpar.” A third of the capital budget is spend on discretionary administrative expenses, hinting at a slush fund. Thirty percent of PREPA’s employees have retired or migrated to the mainland since 2012, the Washington Post reports—especially its skilled workers. Money is short, the report concludes, but so is human and intellectual capital.The agency has $9 billion in debt and said it needs $4 billion to upgrade its infrastructure, including plants whose reliance on oil is passed onto Puerto Ricans in the form of high rates and dirty air. It filed for bankruptcy in July.And that was before a Category 5 hurricane pounded the island this week.The island has spent more than a decade in recession. Unemployment is more than 10 percent, and the population declined by more than 10 percent between 2004 and 2016. In 2015 alone, the net outward migration was more than 64,000, according to Pew. Six in 10 children live in poverty.In May, Puerto Rico filed for bankruptcy under the provisions set forth in PROMESA (Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act), a law signed by President Obama in the summer of 2016. The act established a financial control board for the island, similar to the emergency managers that have governed Detroit and other American cities in the wake of bankruptcies.So far, that board has made some unpopular decisions, cutting spending on public health by 30 percent, closing schools, and lowering the minimum wage for young people to a little over $4 an hour. In the near term, austerity will worsen conditions on the island, where analysts expect the recession to continue until 2020. Many Puerto Ricans see the board as a tool of colonial oversight; at the time PROMESA passed, Bernie Sanders said it was a “junta” that would rule the island like “a colonial master.”But this summer, the financial control board did something surprisingly wise, much to the disappointment of the congressional Republicans who created it: It voted 4–3 to reject a restructuring agreement for the power authority’s $9 billion in debt, infuriating the hedge funds that had negotiated a repayment deal to recoup 85 percent of what they were owed.Luis Santini Gaudier, a consumer representative on the PREPA board, had criticized the deal as “lucrative business” for creditors who had bought PREPA debt on the cheap. The deal was a rip-off, wrote Tom Sanzillo, the director of finance for the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, in the Hill: “Puerto Rico’s economic growth for an entire generation will go largely to off-island financiers rather than into the Puerto Rican economy.” (And that was before accounting for the rest of Puerto Rico’s $60 billion in debt.)The board’s idea is to privatize PREPA. “Lowering the price of electricity and spurring economic growth depended on reforming Prepa’s operations, not merely restructuring its credit,” the four members who had rejected the debt deal wrote in a Wall Street Journal op-ed. Privatization would allow PREPA to “modernize its power supply, depoliticize its management, reform pensions, and renegotiate labor and other contracts to operate more efficiently.” Most importantly, they wrote, no new investment will come into PREPA’s plants, transformers, and lines if Puerto Rico ratepayers are spending the next three decades paying off debt to vulture funds in New York.This plan has made unlikely allies of New York bankers and Puerto Rican labor unions. Union officials are convinced PREPA chiefs are deliberately letting the system fall apart to strengthen the case for privatization, which the island’s governor declared was inevitable before the hurricanes hit. Unions believe their contracts and pensions are safer with elected politicians than with independent business leaders.The banks, which sued the fiscal control board and lost, should be worried that PREPA’s assets could be sold off for a song in order to get a private operator invested in the island’s power system. They’ll wind up getting paid less, and later, than will newer investors eager to rebuild the island’s infrastructure. Their goal—getting paid for years to come by Puerto Ricans on their electricity bills—is at odds with the fiscal control board’s goal of making the island’s electricity cheaper.More: Puerto Rico’s Best Hope for Keeping the Lights On On the Blogs: Puerto Rico Electricity Crisis Heightens Debate Over Privatization vs. Public Controllast_img read more

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Bolivia and Peru to Use Satellites against Drug Trafficking on Lake Titicaca

first_img Fighting aerial drug trafficking Thanks to a recent agreement between Peru and Bolivia to work jointly against narco-trafficking and other criminal activities along their common border, naval vessels from both countries will use a sophisticated satellite system to detect drug shipments in Lake Titicaca, which straddles both nations. “Specific measures will be taken in these areas so that the police forces of both countries can intervene jointly and avoid the escape of drug traffickers from one side of the border into the other,” said Otárola. Under the agreement, the two countries have committed to “double our efforts for the establishment and implementation of much more effective mechanisms in the exchange of information and intelligence using aerial sensors to detect unsupervised aerial spaces,” said Cáceres. Beginning in 2015, drug interdiction operations on Lake Titicaca will be coordinated by the naval and police forces of the two nations. The satellite system allows police and military officials to monitor activity on the lake 24 hours a day. Beginning in 2015, the military and police forces of the two countries will focus their eradication efforts in Bolivian border communities such as Apolo and San Fermín, and the Apurímac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region on the Peruvian side. Agreement also calls for eradication efforts Officials from the two countries, including Otárola and Felipe Cáceres, the Bolivian vice minister of social defense and controlled substances, signed the agreement during the fourth meeting of the Peruvian-Bolivian Combined Commission on November 11 in Lima, Peru. Drug traffickers use aerial routes to transport cocaine from Peru, the world’s largest producer of the drug, to Brazil, the world’s second-largest consumer market. Law enforcement authorities estimate that as much as 90 percent of the 200 tons of cocaine which are trafficked out of the VRAEM region each year are transported by narco-flights, according to insightcrime.org . By Dialogo December 11, 2014 Beginning in 2015, drug interdiction operations on Lake Titicaca will be coordinated by the naval and police forces of the two nations. The satellite system allows police and military officials to monitor activity on the lake 24 hours a day. Since 2010, Bolivia has reduced the number of hectares used to cultivate illegal coca from 34,500 hectares to 23,200 hectares, according to a press release from the Vice Ministry of Social Defense on November 18. “Specific measures will be taken in these areas so that the police forces of both countries can intervene jointly and avoid the escape of drug traffickers from one side of the border into the other,” said Otárola. The Peruvian government has already exceeded its goal of eradicating 30,000 hectares of illegally cultivated coca in 2014. At the end of November, Peruvian police and military forces had destroyed more than 30,300 hectares of illegally cultivated coca. “This type of cooperation between countries is positive. Peru and Bolivia are making a big effort in trying to close the cocaine air route,” said César Ortiz Anderson, President of Peru’s Pro-Citizen Security Association (APROSEC). The Peruvian government has already exceeded its goal of eradicating 30,000 hectares of illegally cultivated coca in 2014. At the end of November, Peruvian police and military forces had destroyed more than 30,300 hectares of illegally cultivated coca. Providing alternatives to the farmers who have been cultivating illegal coca is important. To address that issue, the bilateral meeting on November 11 also established working groups for cooperation in the area of comprehensive and sustainable alternative development, prevention of consumption, rehabilitation, and control of illegal drug trafficking and associated crimes. Drug traffickers use aerial routes to transport cocaine from Peru, the world’s largest producer of the drug, to Brazil, the world’s second-largest consumer market. Law enforcement authorities estimate that as much as 90 percent of the 200 tons of cocaine which are trafficked out of the VRAEM region each year are transported by narco-flights, according to insightcrime.org . Agreement also calls for eradication efforts Liaison officers from both countries will cooperate in each drug interdiction mission, while anti-drug police from Bolivia and Peru will team up to process the coordinates of suspicious vessels on the lake. Thanks to a recent agreement between Peru and Bolivia to work jointly against narco-trafficking and other criminal activities along their common border, naval vessels from both countries will use a sophisticated satellite system to detect drug shipments in Lake Titicaca, which straddles both nations. Drug traffickers have established an air corridor between the two nations to evade the law and transport the drug to the markets of Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay, according to La Razón newspaper. Fighting aerial drug trafficking The accord is not limited to cooperation on land and on the waters of Lake Titicaca. It also calls for the security forces of the two nations to share intelligence to shut down aerial routes used by drug traffickers who cross the border shared by Peru and Bolivia. Under the agreement, the two countries have committed to “double our efforts for the establishment and implementation of much more effective mechanisms in the exchange of information and intelligence using aerial sensors to detect unsupervised aerial spaces,” said Cáceres. It calls for the security forces of the two countries to cooperate in eradicating illegal crops which some farmers grow in the border region. The illegal coca is the primary ingredient in the production of cocaine. In the long run, this close cooperation will help both countries. In the long run, this close cooperation will help both countries. “Experience has shown us that when two countries combine their intelligence systems, operational forces, and political decisions, the results improve,” according to Alberto Otárola Peñaranda, Executive Director of the Peru-based National Commission for Development and Life Without Drugs (DEVIDA), as reported by EjuTv website. “This type of cooperation between countries is positive. Peru and Bolivia are making a big effort in trying to close the cocaine air route,” said César Ortiz Anderson, President of Peru’s Pro-Citizen Security Association (APROSEC). “Experience has shown us that when two countries combine their intelligence systems, operational forces, and political decisions, the results improve,” according to Alberto Otárola Peñaranda, Executive Director of the Peru-based National Commission for Development and Life Without Drugs (DEVIDA), as reported by EjuTv website. Officials from the two countries, including Otárola and Felipe Cáceres, the Bolivian vice minister of social defense and controlled substances, signed the agreement during the fourth meeting of the Peruvian-Bolivian Combined Commission on November 11 in Lima, Peru. Both countries have made progress in eradicating illegal coca crops in recent years. Beginning in 2015, the military and police forces of the two countries will focus their eradication efforts in Bolivian border communities such as Apolo and San Fermín, and the Apurímac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region on the Peruvian side. Both countries have made progress in eradicating illegal coca crops in recent years. Liaison officers from both countries will cooperate in each drug interdiction mission, while anti-drug police from Bolivia and Peru will team up to process the coordinates of suspicious vessels on the lake. The accord is not limited to cooperation on land and on the waters of Lake Titicaca. It also calls for the security forces of the two nations to share intelligence to shut down aerial routes used by drug traffickers who cross the border shared by Peru and Bolivia. Interdictions will be conducted by vessels from the Peruvian and the Bolivian navies, with support from the air forces of the two countries. A fleet of Bolivian Super Puma Since 2010, Bolivia has reduced the number of hectares used to cultivate illegal coca from 34,500 hectares to 23,200 hectares, according to a press release from the Vice Ministry of Social Defense on November 18. The accord “is a milestone on real binational cooperation aimed at strengthening security,” Cáceres said during the signing ceremony. “The operations against drug trafficking carried out by military and police forces will have positive results.” The accord “is a milestone on real binational cooperation aimed at strengthening security,” Cáceres said during the signing ceremony. “The operations against drug trafficking carried out by military and police forces will have positive results.” Providing alternatives to the farmers who have been cultivating illegal coca is important. To address that issue, the bilateral meeting on November 11 also established working groups for cooperation in the area of comprehensive and sustainable alternative development, prevention of consumption, rehabilitation, and control of illegal drug trafficking and associated crimes. It calls for the security forces of the two countries to cooperate in eradicating illegal crops which some farmers grow in the border region. The illegal coca is the primary ingredient in the production of cocaine. Drug traffickers have established an air corridor between the two nations to evade the law and transport the drug to the markets of Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay, according to La Razón newspaper. Interdictions will be conducted by vessels from the Peruvian and the Bolivian navies, with support from the air forces of the two countries. A fleet of Bolivian Super Puma last_img read more

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