Somerville urges employee to turn himself in over stabbing murder

first_imgSomerville College have urged their employee accused of stabbing to death a hairstylist in Chicago to turn himself in to US authorities as police in Chicago said they were “closing in” on him and a US academic.Police in the city said they “have an idea” of the whereabouts of Andrew Warren, a senior treasurer assistant at Oxford’s Somerville College and Wyndham Lathem, a professor at Northwestern University. The pair are accused of stabbing to death a 26-year-old-man, Trenton Cornell-Duranleau, in Lathem’s Chicago apartment.Oxford University said it would help police with their investigation as Somerville College urged Warren to turn himself in.“Andrew Warren’s colleagues at Somerville College have now all been informed and are shocked to learn of the case,” a college spokesperson said.“Whatever the circumstances, we would urge him to contact the US authorities as soon as possible, in the best interests of everyone concerned.”Officers in Chicago said their hunt for the Warren, 56, and Lathem, 42, a microbiology professor, was “intensifying”.“We do have an idea of their whereabouts and efforts to locate them are only intensifying from here on in,” a spokesperson said.“Our primary focus is to facilitate a safe surrender and we strongly encourage Professor Lathem and Mr Warren to do the right thing.”Officers found the victim with multiple stab wounds in Lathem’s 10th floor apartment on 27 July. The attack was so violent that the blade of the knife believed to have been used to stab Cornell-Duranleau had broken, Chicago police said.US police warned members of the public that the because of the violent nature of their alleged crime, the pair were believed to be “armed and dangerous”.Warren, 56, oversaw pensions and payrolls at Somerville. According to police and media reports, he is believed to have flown to the US days before the murder took place, after allegedly meeting Lathem online.Court files give Warren’s address as Somerville but his Facebook profile says he lives in Swindon, Wiltshire and is a former cashier and Stagecoach bus driver.In an email sent to Somerville staff and students on Tuesday morning, the college Principal, Alice Prochaska said: “Neither the College nor the university were aware of the case, which is clearly extremely worrying. We and the university authorities will liaise with the investigating authorities and provide any assistance that is required.“This comes as upsetting news to all of us. Counselling support can be made available to anyone who needs it.”In a statement on Thursday, Oxford University said it had been in contact with police in the UK about Warren and was “ready to help the US investigating authorities in any way they need”.His alleged accomplice, Wyndham Lathem, had worked as a scientist at Northwestern University since 2007, specialising in the bubonic plague.Northwestern said Lathem had been placed on leave and was banned from entering the campus.last_img read more

Read More »

Savvy Senior Does Medicare Cover Dental Care?

first_imgDear Savvy Senior,I will turn 65 in a few months and will be enrolling in Medicare, but I am concerned about Medicare’s coverage of dental care. Does Medicare cover dental procedures? And if not, where can I get dental coverage? Almost 65Dear Almost,Medicare’s coverage of dental care is extremely limited. It will not cover routine dental care including checkups, cleanings, or fillings, and it won’t pay for dentures either.Medicare will, however, cover some dental services if they are required to protect your general health, or if you need dental care in order for another health service that Medicare covers to be successful. For example, if you have cancer and need dental services that are necessary for radiation treatment, or if you need surgery to treat fractures of the jaw or face, Medicare will pay for these dental services.Although Medicare’s coverage of dental services is limited, there are other ways you can get coverage and care affordably. Here are several to check into.Consider a Medicare Advantage plan: While dental services are mostly excluded under original Medicare, some Medicare Advantage plans do provide coverage for routine dental care. If you are considering joining a Medicare Advantage plan, find out what dental services, if any, it covers. Also, remember to make sure any Medicare Advantage plan you’re considering covers the doctors and hospitals you prefer to use and the medications you take at a cost you can afford. See Medicare.gov/find-a-plan or call 800-633-4227 to research plans in your area.Purchase dental insurance: If you have frequent gum problems and need extensive dental care, a dental insurance plan may be worth the costs versus paying for care yourself. Expect to pay monthly premiums of $15 to $40 or more for insurance. To find dental plans in your state, go to NADP.org and use the “find a dental plan” tool. Then review a specific plan’s website.Consider dental savings plans: While savings plans aren’t as comprehensive as insurance, they’re a good option for those who can’t get covered. How this works is you pay an annual membership fee – around $80 to $200 a year – in exchange for 10 to 60 percent discounts on service and treatments from participating dentists. To find a savings plan, go toDentalPlans.com (or 888-632-5353) where you can search for plans and participating dentists, as well as get a breakdown of the discounts offered.Check veterans’ benefits: If you’re a veteran enrolled in the VA health care program or are a beneficiary of the Civilian Health and Medical Program (CHAMPVA), the VA offers a dental insurance program that gives you the option to buy dental insurance through Delta Dental and MetLife at a reduced cost. The VA also provides free dental care to vets who have dental problems resulting from service. To learn more about these options, visit VA.gov/dentalor call 877-222-8387.Shop around: FairHealthConsumer.org and HealthcareBlueBook.com lets you look up the cost of different dental procedures in your area, so you can comparison shop – or ask your regular dentist for a discount.Try community health centers or dental schools: There are many health centers and clinics that provide low-cost dental care to those in need. And all university dental schools and college dental hygiene programs offer dental care and cleanings for less than half of what you would pay at a dentist’s office. Students who are supervised by their professors provide the care. See ToothWisdom.org to search for a center, clinic or school near you.Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.last_img read more

Read More »

First Quality sells division

first_imgFirst Quality Foods has sold its couscous packing division to concentrate on its core cereal bar and cake bakery business.The Bristol-based company sold the division, including the Sammy’s brand, to Symington’s – the Leeds-based firm which also packs the Ainsley Harriott brand and own-label products – for an undisclosed sum.First Quality’s managing director Sam Jacobi said: “The sale of the Sammy’s brand and our couscous packing division will enable us to focus on our core businesses, where we feel we can add significant value. We had taken the Sammy’s brand as far as we could and feel that the brand can flourish under the wing of a bigger company. Symington’s seemed the natural home for Sammy’s.”The company’s bakery, Kingsbake, makes Ma Baker flapjacks, cakes, slices and natural fruit-and-nut bars under own-brand and private-label.last_img read more

Read More »

Academic Council votes to dissolve Econ dept.

first_imgThe Academic Council voted to dissolve the Department of Economics and Policy Studies (ECOP) at its meeting Thursday.The department will cease to exist effective at the end of the semester.The existing Department of Economics and Econometrics will be renamed the Department of Economics, and will serve as the University’s sole economics department.The University has supported two economics departments since 2003, when the Academic Council voted to split the Department of Economics into Economics and Policy Studies and Economics and Econometrics.Since 2003, the ECOP, which emphasizes alternative economics theories, has not been allowed to hire new faculty members or accept doctoral candidates.John McGreevy, dean of the College of Arts and Letters, initially proposed the dissolution of ECOP last year. Continuing to support two economics departments is “not sustainable,” McGreevy said in September.Fate of the FacultyThe tenure of ECOP faculty members will be respected, McGreevy said. The University is currently working with the faculty to identify new institutional areas for them. McGreevy said he hopes to find new departments for ECOP professors by the end of the semester.Some Policy Studies professors might move to the reestablished Department of Economics, but they will have to be invited by the department itself, McGreevy said.“It’s a mutual process,” he said.McGreevy cited the Kroc Institute, the Kellogg Institute and the Poverty Studies minor as potential homes for ECOP faculty.The Poverty Studies minor is currently administered by the Department of Economics and Policy Studies.“We envision [the minor] as part of the Center for Social Concerns,” McGreevy said.Faculty Senate passed a resolution calling for ECOP faculty to be allowed to return to the reestablished Department of Economics.The resolution protested the “removal of a faculty member from a continuing department without his or her consent.”Because current ECOP faculty members were tenured in the pre-2003 Department of Economics, Faculty Senate claims these faculty members “have been involuntarily excluded from the Department of Economics,” according to the resolution.Faculty Senate was concerned about the “treatment of the faculty in this particular case,” Seth Brown, chair of Faculty Senate’s Administrative Affairs Committee, said. Concerns about Academic FreedomEconomics and Policy Studies faculty members protested the plan to eliminate the department in a letter released last month. The letter expresses the unanimous opinion of the ECOP faculty, department chair Jennifer Warlick said.Dissolving the department would “undermine the strong and vibrant conversation about economics that currently exists within our University,” the letter said.“[The Academic Council’s action] represents a dangerous precedent for academic freedom and university governance,” the letter said.Dissolving the department inhibits ECOP faculty members’ ability to “participate in the education of our students, to conduct our research, and to engage in service activities,” the letter said.The decision to dissolve the department, however, was made in part to broaden the “economics conversation” at the University, McGreevy said.“We’re not eliminating their ideas, and we hope they continue to make as big a contribution as they have made,” he said. “The faculty may be in different units, but I’ve always thought that’s less important than the broader conversation.”McGreevy said the new Department of Economics will be “open to different ideas and methodologies,” as opposed to embracing only one approach to economics.Faculty Senate did not argue “that there was some particular affront to academic freedom in this face,” Brown said.The Senate’s concerns about academic freedom were part of its concerns about tenure. “The purpose of tenure is to safeguard academic freedom,” Brown said.Reducing the protections of tenure makes faculty members less willing to pursue unpopular or cutting-edge research, according to Brown. Student Involvement Student Senate passed a resolution calling for the delay of the decision to dissolve the department last week.“We opposed this on the grounds that student input hasn’t been included,” student body chief of staff Ryan Brellenthin said.Student body president Grant Schmidt said he has gotten feedback from many students.“We emphasized that students were frustrated with the process,” Schmidt said.After the decision was made to dissolve the department, student government hopes to make the Department of Economics as academically viable as possible, Schmidt said.“I have confidence the Economics Department will continue to be successful,” Schmidt said. “It’s important for us to continue to be a part of the conversation.“We want to have a spot at the table when it comes to discussing major academic decisions.”Brellenthin said he hopes to work with McGreevy to “ensure that the aspects of the old department that were beneficial continue to exist,” he said.“We want to make sure the decision doesn’t take anything away from the undergraduate education,” he said.McGreevy cited the sensitive nature of closing a department as a limitation to how much he could dialogue with students before the decision was finalized, but he said he is open to student input. “Students need to take charge of their education at Notre Dame,” he said.McGreevy said he welcomes student involvement in economics now that ECOP has been dissolved.“I am happy to think through with groups of students how we can best build an economics major at Notre Dame,” he said.last_img read more

Read More »

Three elected to the Bar board, one runoff set

first_img April 15, 2003 Regular News Three elected to the Bar board, one runoff set Three elected to the Bar board, one runoff setcenter_img Three board races were decided and another wound up in a runoff in March Bar Board of Governors elections.For the Young Lawyers Division, five races were decided for the YLD board, while a sixth went to a runoff.With the senior BoG, Raleigh W. Greene III, who got 369 votes, will face Murray B. Silverstein, who got 296 votes, in the Sixth Circuit, Seat 2 race. They bettered Lynn Howell, who got 206 votes, and Denis A. Cohr, who got 79, in the first round of balloting.Ballots for the runoff were mailed around April 1 and must be returned to the Bar’s election company no later than midnight April 21. Bar members also have the option of voting online.In the other board races, Gwynne A. Young defeated Daniel P. Mitchell in the 13th Circuit, Seat 3, 954 to 576; Jerald S. Beer outpolled Richard B. Kay in the 15th Circuit, Seat 2, 953 to 227; and Harold G. Melville bested Gean Cary Junginger, Jr., in the 19th Circuit, Seat 1, 356 to 51.(There were initially two other contested board races in the 11th Circuit, but those wound up uncontested when candidates dropped out.)In the YLD contests, Garrett Biondo, who got 152 votes, will face Mario Garcia, who received 165 votes, in the runoff for the 11th Circuit, Seat 1. They led N. Vail Gardner, who got 112 votes.In the decided races, in the Ninth Circuit, Seat 1, Paul J. Scheck defeated Lawrence H. Kolin, 224 to 90; in the 11th Circuit, Seat 2, Cynthia Morales bested Rodney Smith 249 to 154; in the 13th Circuit, Seat 1, R. J. Haughey II, outpolled Steven D. Lehner 181 to 130; in the 15th Circuit, Seat 3, Ginny R. Neal defeated David J. Pascuzzi 138 to 57; and in the 17th Circuit, Seat 3, Jill M. Bennett garnered 104 votes, besting Nicholas W. Romanello with 77 and Leonard Wilder with 23.All the victorious candidates, along with those elected without opposition, will be sworn in at the Annual Meeting in June.last_img read more

Read More »

How to bounce back from a spending spree

first_imgWe’ve all been there. We intend to make a few purchases then all of the sudden we realize we’ve gone overboard with our spending. You may feel the urge to panic but before you do, consider these tips for damage control after going nuts on a spending spree.Prioritize purchasesWhen the dust has settled and your panic begins to recede, start to look back over what you’ve bought. Are these things vital to your life, or are they all “extras” that you don’t necessarily have a need for? Sure, it’s fun to get new things just for the heck of it, but if you’ve spent too much, you may need to think about returning some things to get your money on track.Get back on budgetSure, you’ve gone way over the limit, but it’s time to move forward and recover. Remember how you typically spend and if that’s been working for you, go back to your old ways. Don’t beat yourself up over what’s in the past because we’ve all been there. It’s time to regroup and remember your limits.Plan to pay backStick to your original budget, but also consider ways you’re going to make up for the damage you’ve done to your wallet. If you’ve charged your purchases, now’s the time to dip into that debt repayment fund you’ve been saving up. Or, if you shopped with cash, to pay yourself back, plan for ways you can trim your spending until your finances are where they were before your spending spree.Reflect on patternsGetting in this position every once in a blue moon is not cause for too much for concern. But, if overspending and busting your budget is becoming a pattern, you need to stop and assess the issue. Is there a particular reason why you’re shopping/spending habits are getting out of control? Understanding why you’re behaving the way you are will help you to make corrections and learn from your mistakes. 74SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Wendy Moody Wendy Moody is a Senior Editor with CUInsight.com. Wendy works with the editorial team to help edit the content including current news, press releases, jobs and events. She keeps … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

Read More »

Tripartite forum to deliver suggestions on labor issues in omnibus bill to House

first_imgHowever, Ida said that several items discussed had not yet received a unanimous agreement from the forum. “Regardless of whether or not a full agreement is reached, the forum had committed to finishing the discussion”.The bill seeks to revise 79 laws and more than 1,200 articles, from labor and mining regulations to business license and environmental laws. The bill aims to cut red tape and attract investment in the country, boosting the economic situation during the pandemic crisis. Previously, the ministry invited a total of 14 labor unions to the forum. However, seven of the unions decided to step out of the forum after expressing their objections over how it acted as a mere hearing session for the government with no guarantee that the feedback would be incorporated in the deliberation process.The government expects deliberation of the bill to be finished in August despite mounting pressure from labor unions and the World Bank over fears that it would negatively affect workers’ welfare.Topics : Manpower Minister Ida Fauziyah said on Sunday that a tripartite forum consisting of labor union groups, the Indonesian Employers Association (Apindo) and the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Kadin) has finished discussing labor issues in the omnibus bill on job creation and planned to soon deliver their suggestions to the House of Representatives. “All suggestions from the forum will be made into a completed draft of the bill and it would soon be proposed to the House of Representatives,” Ida said in a statement, adding that prior to being delivered to the House, the draft would first be sent to Coordinating Economic Minister Airlangga Hartarto.  Ida appreciated the efforts made by the forum, which offered a “dynamic” discussion. “Having different opinions is a common thing in discussion. It shows how everyone in the forum was given the same opportunity to express their different perspectives,” she said. The tripartite forum conducted at least nine meetings to discuss the bill from July 8 to July 23. As reported by tempo.co, the forum discussed 10 issues in the omnibus bill, namely foreign workers, temporary workers, outsourcing, work hours, rest breaks, employment terminations, severance pay, sanctions, unemployment benefits and job benefits.Read also: Lawmakers may drop labor cluster from Indonesia’s jobs bill to meet August deadlinelast_img read more

Read More »

BLOG: New Oil and Gas Drilling Regulations and a Government That Works

first_imgLike Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf June 16, 2016 Energy,  Environment,  Government That Works,  The Blog One of the key tenets of the Wolf Administration is that residents of the commonwealth deserve a government that works. When it came to the Department of Environmental Protection’s efforts to strengthen regulations on oil and gas exploration, a government that works was a government that listened.That’s why, during the course of writing and revising the Department’s Oil and Gas Surface Regulations, DEP conducted an unprecedented amount of engagement with the public, spanning multiple administrations.The Department’s new Chapter 78a regulations, which will update and strengthen rules governing the extraction of oil and gas from rock formations a mile or more below the surface of Pennsylvania, initially began under the Rendell Administration and have been in the process of being revised since 2011, and Act 13 of 2012, signed into law by Governor Corbett, added additional regulatory updates that have been incorporated.Over the last five years, DEP has engaged in one of the largest public participation efforts in the agency’s history. In 2013 and 2014, DEP held a 90-day public comment period on the first draft of the regulations. In addition, nine public hearings were held across the Commonwealth to ensure that Pennsylvanians would have the opportunity to make their voices heard on the regulations. Natural gas exploration is an important part of Pennsylvania’s economy, but also brings with it the potential for significant impacts to air, land, water and public health. It is vital that the people of Commonwealth are engaged on these issues.After the 2014 public participation – which drew more than 23,000 comments – the Wolf Administration went through an additional process in order to hear even more public comment. This step was voluntarily undertaken by DEP to solicit additional feedback from changes made after the initial comment period. Three more public hearings were held, and over a 45-day comment period, an additional 4,900 comments were received. DEP reviewed, evaluated and responded to each of the nearly 30,000 comments received throughout the development of this regulation.This process has now established new regulations for unconventional drilling, most commonly referred to as fracking, that set forth new standards to protect public resources, including water, land and places like parks and schools. The new regulations also improve landowners ability to express their concerns and modernize the regulatory program to recognize advances in technology.Public involvement in the policymaking process is one of the most important parts of good governance. DEP has already built on the positive feedback we’ve received in the course of development of this regulation and has applied lessons learned in other policy areas. DEP recently launched a new online comment system – eComment – to make it easier for Pennsylvanians to make their voices heard. And the Office of Environmental Justice, newly reconstituted by Governor Wolf, will be exploring new ways to engage communities that have been traditionally marginalized in the policy process.DEP continues to work with and for the people of Pennsylvania to protect the land, air, and waters of the Commonwealth. The most important voice that the Wolf Administration can hear when it comes to protecting the environment is yours. BLOG: New Oil and Gas Drilling Regulations and a Government That Workscenter_img By: Samuel Robinson, Deputy Secretary of Policy and Planning SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Read More »

The best Aussie party pads on the market

first_imgAustralian flagCHRISTMAS is over, New Years is done and dusted, and now thoughts turn to Australia Day. Held on January 26, our national day is a much more simple affair, with high heels and dress shoes kicked off in favour of a pair of comfy pluggers, suits make way for budgie smugglers and the barbecue reigns supreme.So Australians all let us rejoice … in these Aussie party pads.First up is five bedroom house that comes with its own mini-me Aussie pub. Located in its own shed, it has been set up as the ultimate entertaining space, with the current owner proudly shouting their state of origin. Queenslanderrrrrrrrr!There is also a huge covered entertaining area with a wall-mounted TV and a barbecue range hood, an in-ground pool and views of Mount Neurum and the Glasshouse Mountains. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus14 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market14 hours agoAt top spot for a frothy!At Wights Mountain, a six bedroom architecturally-designed house on 1.56ha is on the market for offers over $1.3 million. This Wights Mountain house has a bar, a spa and plenty of wide open spaces for a game of cricket. With that amount of space you could crank Barnsey and not bother the neighbours. How’s the serenity at Buderim? Located on the lower ground floor is a pool room and a deck and bar area. Yep, room to hit a six!There is also plenty of spaces to entertain your mates, starting with a tennis court to practice those moves learned while watch the Australian Open.After that, you can take a dip in the pool to cool off in what will no doubt be a typical summer stinker.From there, you can pour a drink at the bar, hop in the spa and watch Muriels Wedding on the mounted TV in the entertainment area. Other features include a gym/media room and ducted airconditioning. And in Buderim, a four-bedroom house on a 3319sq m block is on the market for offers over $1.35 million. And the house ain’t bad either.last_img read more

Read More »

Happy Holidays!

first_imgMerry Christmas and a Happy New Year!  Even though there are many sporting events through the next couple of weeks, don’t forget to spend quality time with you family and friends.I will be back on January 2 with a new year of Huddle Ups.last_img

Read More »