Fallout from Molex plant closure will hit Mid West

first_imgFacebook BusinessNewsFallout from Molex plant closure will hit Mid WestBy Staff Reporter – October 24, 2019 1215 Advertisement WhatsApp Twitter Printcenter_img Email Linkedin THE shock announcement that US multinational Molex is to close its Shannon manufacturing base with the loss of 500 jobs will have major repercussions for the Mid West region.Apart from the devastating impact on workers directly employed in the Shannon plant and several hundred others in ancillary industries, the closure has also raised questions about the region’s reliance on multi-national companies to deliver sustainable employment.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up As one of the longest established US owned companies in the region, Molex was held up as an example of the benefits of Foreign Direct Investment to the national and regional economy.But confirmation that the decision to close the Shannon operation was influenced by its heavy reliance on US trade with China, which has been devastated by President Trump’s ‘America First’ policy, underlines the vulnerability of multi-national companies in the current economic climate.The Illinois-based corporation said that, following a review of the product lines manufactured at its Irish facility, they had decided to close the plant by the end of 2020. The closure will take place in a series of phases, starting early next year.The intransigence of the company’s approach was underlined on Wednesday when Business, Enterprise and Innovation Minister Heather Humphreys visited the Shannon plant only to be told that there would be no divergence from the decision to cease operations by the end of next year.Minister Humphreys said she had spoken with the company’s chief executive who had expressed his deep regret at the decision.“He made clear that, while the decision was made very reluctantly, it was irreversible. He explained it was a global decision made on the basis that 75 per cent of the product they manufacture in the Shannon plant is at end of life.”In a statement issued on Tuesday, the company said that  the decision was a very difficult one  “due to its impact on our employees, and the deep ties Molex has with the region and its people having operated in Shannon since 1971”.Shannon was Molex’s first European facility and most of its staff are from the Limerick/Clare area.IDA Ireland Executive Director Mary Buckley said the agency would continue to work with the company to market the Shannon site to potential investors.“Securing investment for Clare and the Mid West region is a continuing priority for IDA Ireland,” she said.Limerick Fine Senator Kieran O’Donnell, who raised the issue in a Seanad debate on Tuesday, said that he had asked Minister Humphreys to prioritise engagement between the IDA and Molex to explore the creation of alternative replacement jobs by Molex.Speaking in the Dáil on Tuesday, Limerick Sinn Féin TD Maurice Quinlivan said the Molex closure will be the biggest loss of jobs in the Mid-West since the Dell plant closed in 2009.“Combined with job losses at Roche and Moneypoint, it’s clear the Mid-West needs far greater state support when it comes to jobs and employment opportunities.“Also deeply concerning is the number of indirect jobs in local businesses which will also be affected by the announcement,” he said. Previous articleSpooky goings on all around LimerickNext articleFairview and Ballynanty take centre stage in Munster Junior Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ielast_img read more

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Video Odds & Ends: Sara Bareilles Teams Up With Leslie Odom Jr. & More

first_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories videos you may have missed today. Sara Bareilles Teams Up With Leslie Odom Jr. Waitress scribe Sara Bareilles was asked by This American Life to imagine what President Obama might be thinking about the current election and Donald Trump, but can’t say publicly. She enlisted Hamilton Tony winner Leslie Odom Jr. to perform the song below and Velvet smoke did not disappoint! Seriously. View Comments Mary-Louise Parker Shows Off Her Maple SyrupMary-Louise Parker is currently starring in Heisenberg on Broadway and she stopped by The Late Show on October 27 to discuss Simon Stephens’ latest play and more. The Tony winner revealed she spends most of her free time on a farm, tending to her goats and tapping trees to make maple syrup. As you do! The production is playing at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre. Star Files New Trailer for Lesli Margherita FilmNaughty language alert! We have the latest trailer for musical comedy Opening Night, which stars Lesli Margherita, Topher Grace, Taye Diggs, JC Chasez and more. Directed by Isaac Rentz, the film follows a failed Main Stem star who ends up as a stage manager; it will be available on VOD from November 18. P.S. Here’s a first listen to Alessia Cara singing the Lin-Manuel Miranda track “How Far I’ll Go” from Moana. Lesli Margherita Santino Fontana’s Latest Crazy Ex-Girlfriend NumberCheck out this sneak peek at the newest song from the second season of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend. Much as we love Tony nominee Santino Fontana, we’re not sure we’ll be drinking with him anytime soon…The show airs Fridays at 9PM/8PM Central on The CW. Leslie Odom Jr.last_img read more

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Angela Merkel’s failure may be just what Europe needs

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionIn an unpredictable world, it’s always a pleasure to claim vindication for one’s own prophetic powers, and the political crisis in Germany — the inability of Angela Merkel to form a coalition government that keeps her country’s far right sidelined — could easily inspire an “I told you so” from those of us who have criticized the German chancellor and doubted her leader-of-the-free-world mystique.That mystique is undeserved because it is too kind to her decision, lauded for its idealism but ultimately deeply reckless and destabilizing, to swiftly admit a million-odd migrants into the heart of Europe in 2015.No recent move has so clearly highlighted the undemocratic, Berlin-dominated nature of European decision making and the gulf between the elite consensus and popular opinion. But while it’s possible that a Bourbon Restoration scenario awaits, in which our overclass learns nothing and forgets nothing during the Trumpian disruption, there is something mildly encouraging in the willingness of Merkel’s competitors in the political center, not just on the extreme right, to act as though they’ve learned lessons from her high-minded blunder, and to campaign and negotiate as if the public’s opinions about migration policy should actually prevail.Better that kind of crisis-generating move by far, in fact, than a grand coalition of parties united only in their anti-populism, and perfectly designed to ratify the populist critique that all the elites are in cahoots.What will save the liberal order, if it is to be saved, will be the successful integration of concerns that its leaders have dismissed or ignored back into normal political debate, an end to what Josh Barro of Business Insider has called “no-choice politics,” in which genuine ideological pluralism is something to be smothered with a pillow.In Angela Merkel’s Europe right now, that should mean making peace with Brexit, ceasing to pursue ever further political centralization by undemocratic means, breaking up the ‘60s-era intellectual cartels that control the commanding heights of culture, creating space for religious resistance to the lure of nihilism and suicide — and accepting that the days of immigration open doors are over, and the careful management of migrant flows is a central challenge for statesmen going forward.But a necessary first step, in the country that really rules the continent, would be for more people to recognize that if Merkel’s long rule is threatened it need not be a sign of liberalism in crisis, but rather an indicator that it could yet be restored to health.Ross Douthat is an op-ed columnist with The New York Times.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? And no move has contributed so much to the disturbances since — the worsening of Europe’s terrorism problem, the shock of Brexit and the rise of Donald Trump, and the growing divide between the EU’s Franco-German core and its eastern nations.So it’s fitting that the immigration issue has finally come back to undercut Merkel directly, first costing her votes in Germany’s last election, which saw unprecedented gains for the nationalist Alternative for Germany party, and then making a potential grand coalition impossible in part because the centrist, pro-business Free Democrats now see an opportunity in getting to Merkel’s right on migration policy.Yes, thanks to the continued fallout from her rash decision, and just as her critics predicted, Germany stares into the abyss of … well, actually, no, it doesn’t really stare into the abyss at all.It just has to choose between a new election, which would probably deliver the same divisions but would still leave the nationalists stuck at 10-15 percent of the vote and Merkel’s party with a plurality, and a minority government led by Merkel herself, which would be a novelty in Berlin but which is normal enough in other stable Western countries.Both options promise problems that Germany hasn’t had to deal with in its modern and unified shape, but also problems that are quite routine for developed-world democracies.Neither option is going to suddenly elevate the AfD to power, unravel the European Union or bring National Socialism lurching back to life.As political crises go, the one Merkel has brought upon her country isn’t exactly a Weimar moment, or even a Trump-scale shock.center_img And for all the pleasures of “I told you so,” those of us who never bought into the Merkel mystique should not pretend that she’s delivered some sort of catastrophe just yet.Instead, what she’s delivered is an opportunity for leaders in Germany and in the wider West to learn from her mistakes. For all the understandable talk about the crisis of Western liberalism, the political chaos of the last few years has also demonstrated that many supposed agents of post-liberalism are unready to really push the liberal order to the breaking point.President Donald Trump is a political weakling, not a Caesar; Marine Le Pen can’t break 35 percent of France’s presidential vote; the Islamic State has all-but-fallen.Which means that the custodians of the liberal order, the kind of people wringing their hands over Merkel’s present struggles, still have an opportunity to prove their critics wrong, to show that their worldview is more adaptable to changed circumstances than it has seemed.I’m not sure they’re ready for that adaptation; instead, my sense of the state of Western elites after Trump and Brexit is similar to the analysis offered recently by Michael Brendan Dougherty in National Review.Dougherty has been circulating in high-level confabs since Trump’s election and reports a persistent mood of entitlement and ‘90s nostalgia — a refusal to take responsibility for foreign policy failures, to admit that post-national utopianism was oversold, to reckon with the social decay and spiritual crisis shadowing the cosmopolitan dream.Indeed, all the high-level agita surrounding Germany’s political crisis — good heavens, not a minority government! — suggests a basic deficiency of elite imagination that will be one of the things that brings down the liberal order if it does eventually fall.last_img read more

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Six Nations gets underway today

first_imgFrance will play host to Italy in the opening game of this year’s tournament, with kick-off at the Stade de France at 2:25pm.That game will be followed by the Calcutta Cup contest between Scotland and England at Murrayfield.The action in Edinburgh begins at 4:50pm. Meanwhile, the Ireland Womens team will begin the defence of their Six Nations title this afternoon.Tom Tierney’s side will play host to their Welsh counter-parts at their new home in Donnybrook after several years playing their home matches in Ashbourne.Kick-off in Ashbourne is at 1 o’clock, with the meeting of France and Italy taking place tonight at 8pm.last_img read more

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Miller: Billy Eppler deals the Angels upgraded hope

first_imgIt wasn’t retaining Justin Upton.Or landing Shohei Ohtani.Or acquiring Ian Kinsler.Or signing Zack Cozart. Eppler, though, appears to have pretty much nailed it, filling three positions – second base, third base and left field – that in recent seasons for this team have been, to various degrees, pits of crippling despair.On top of that, in Ohtani he added a multi-talented player who could be a star when the Angels are on offense and defense and, quite possibly, any third option baseball might invent before next opening day.Now, for the small print, the disclaimer that must be included in every baseball story written outside baseball season:Despite everything Eppler has accomplished, the Angels are guaranteed to be nothing next summer but moderately rebuilt.No matter how many teams have memorable offseasons – and there are always at least a few – only one finishes with a memorable on-season, leaving the 29 others to ponder moves that ultimately failed to bring a championship.Remember, there was a recent December when a lot of people around here were excited about Josh Hamilton, too.But, a week before this Christmas, it would be difficult to improve upon what Eppler has done, particularly since the Angels still aren’t exactly bloated with the assets usually needed to bolster a big-league roster.Oh, sure, his entire plan could yet go to pieces like a dropped gingerbread man.The Angels now have five years and $106 million committed to Upton, a player who has been on five teams in five seasons.Kinsler turns 36 in June and is coming off a season in which his batting average dropped 60 points from where it ended in 2015.Cozart just had his finest season in Cincinnati but never has played third or made as much as $5.5 million, and the Angels just gave him a surprising three years at a stunning $38 million to be their third baseman.Worst of all, it has been learned that Ohtani already has an elbow issue, his ability to play both ways also meaning he has twice the chance to get hurt, a potentially cruel fate, to be sure, but one to keep in mind since these are the Angels.Still – even when viewed in the dimmest light possible – Eppler has plugged three troublesome, lingering holes with veterans used to playing every day, veterans with histories of producing.This is nothing like the winter of 2012 when the Angels attempted to sell as an improvement Joe Blanton and then watched in horror as the right-hander went 2-14, somehow actually pitching worse than the numbers suggested.Short of injuring Mike Trout in a spring training prank involving a jock full of scorpions, Kinsler can’t be anywhere near as bad as Blanton was, even if his batting average drops another 60 points.All of these players represent upgrades, Ohtani also costing the Angels – after the $20-million posting fee and a $2.3-million bonus – no more than any other unproven rookie. Elbow issue and all, nearly every team still wanted him.So Eppler is deserving of the backslaps and high-fives that no doubt have been greeting him in the hallways of the Angels’ front office.In characterizing these four prominent moves, each one is worthy of late-July news treatment. Yes, a deadline headline.Of course, in the end, this coming Angels season hinges greatly on the health of the pitching staff, a hinge that of late has been rusty and in need of more than just oil.Eppler also is talking about employing a six-man rotation as a means to accommodate Ohtani and offer him more rest.While that sounds great, the Angels have had enough trouble keeping five starters upright at any one time. Adding a sixth arm isn’t as simple as just adding a sixth body.Sorting out those problems, however, is why spring training lasts six weeks. There will be plenty of time to worry about all of that and more. For now, Eppler is to be commended.No, they don’t hand out championship rings for the offseason. But Eppler doesn’t need to flash bling to prove he succeeded, not when he’s already wearing Gatorade. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorcenter_img Instead, this recent news development is the one that best captures the offseason for Billy Eppler:It’s nearly impossible today to find anything for which to blatantly criticize the Angels’ general manager.It’s like he went 4 for 4 with the game-winning, bottom-of-the-ninth extra-base hit. In fact, right now, someone should burst into Eppler’s office and celebrate the moment the way the players do, by showering him with the icy contents of a Gatorade bucket.Many of us in the media aren’t comfortable with these sunny-and-smiling forecasts. We’re more conditioned to predict thunderstorms and hail, with a 100-percent chance of calamity.We prefer to exercise our God-given right to question the wisdom of those in charge, even if it means sometimes likening their intellect to that of a Honey Baked ham.last_img read more

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Okeechobee County woman charged in ex-boyfriend’s shooting death

first_imgPolice arrested a Okeechobee County woman for the shooting death of her ex-boyfriend.The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office says 29-year-old Roykeria Wiley was seen in surveillance camera footage running from a South Bay, Florida home moments after 43-year-old Estevan Rodriguez was shot from close range.The footage also captured a man running from the home and getting into the woman’s truck.Authorities say the couple broke up and Wiley had a violent outburst in that home three days before the killing.She is now facing homicide charges.last_img read more

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