British Red Cross raises more online than offline for tsunami appeal

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 7 January 2005 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies Digital Research / statistics The British Red Cross’ emergency tsunami appeal was launched at midday on 26 December, the day of the disaster, and has raised over £3.3 million online.Much of the total donated was raised during the first five days of the appeal during the holiday period, showing how important it was to have the website available throughout this period.This is the first time that a British Red Cross appeal has raised more money online than offline. This is even more significant because of the scale of the giving: the response was more than 10 times higher than that to the Bam earthquake a year previously.Charity website specialists Baigent, who manage the website for the British Red Cross, called in staff from their holidays to provide additional capacity for the site and donation facilities. The site, unlike those of some other charities, was able to cope with the sudden and massive demand.According to figures compiled by independent website traffic analysts Hitwise, the British Red Cross website together with the Blue Peter Welcome Home Appeal site received 13.4% of all charity website visits during the week after Boxing Day.Mark Astarita, Director of Fundraising for the British Red Cross said: “Traffic to the site increased dramatically overnight when we became the number one listing on Google, with news sites (BBC, Yahoo, Sky) and major internet properties such as Amazon and Apple linking to us.“The British Red Cross is at the forefront of emergency response to international disasters, and with Baigent’s support we had the systems in place to raise £3 million in under one week.”The website is set to become an even greater part of the British Red Cross’ communications and fundraising strategy in the coming year with a major redesign by Baigent, due to be launched this month. British Red Cross raises more online than offline for tsunami appeal  21 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Charities need reserves policy, argues Charity Commission

first_img Howard Lake | 7 November 2006 | News Charities need reserves policy, argues Charity Commission  19 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Finance About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img The report is based on data from 87% of charities with an income of over £10,000. The policy message is getting through, but not to all charities: the proportion of charities with a reserves policy has risen from 27% in 2002 to 40% in 2006, while the amount being held without a policy has dropped from £5.5 billion in 2003 to £3.6 billion this year.However, since 2002, the value of all charities’ reserves has grown from £26 billion to at least £35.5 billion. Even now, nearly one third of charities with reserves still have no reserves policy in place for their management, amounting to 10% of charities’ total annual expenditure. Andrew Hind, Chief Executive of the Charity Commission said: “Charities have never been more under the spotlight and it’s key that they are open and account for their reserves. Charities… must get to grips with this issue as part of their plan for long term sustainability.” The Charity Commission is urging all charities to ensure they have a policy for holding and managing reserves. The watchdog’s latest report, ‘Tell it like it is’, reveals that charities in England and Wales between them hold £3.6 billion of charitable funds without a policy.While retaining reserves is good business practice for charities, especially when most face unpredictable income streams, the Charity Commission argues that charities need to develop a policy on holding on to this money.According to the Commission, a policy explaining these reserves helps a charity plan ahead, and explain to supporters and funders alike why they hold this money. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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AACER: Bankruptcy Filings Continue Five-Year Downward Trend in January

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / AACER: Bankruptcy Filings Continue Five-Year Downward Trend in January Tagged with: AACER Bankruptcies Bankruptcy Filings Epiq Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago AACER: Bankruptcy Filings Continue Five-Year Downward Trend in January Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Related Articles Subscribe  Print This Post in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Share Save February 9, 2015 1,025 Views About Author: Brian Honeacenter_img Previous: DS News Webcast: Monday 2/9/2015 Next: Clayton Holdings Hires New Business Development Director Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Nationwide bankruptcy filings dropped by more than 13 percent year-over-year in January, continuing a five-year trend, according to AACER bankruptcy data reported by Epiq Systems.The total number of bankruptcies filed in the United States for January was 59,037, marking the fifth January in a row that bankruptcy filings declined year-over-year. January’s filing total represented a 13.5 percent decrease from January 2014, when 68,271 bankruptcies were filed, and a decline of 42.6 percent from their highest total for any January, which was 102,835 reached in January 2010. Filings have declined year-over-year each January since 2011.Click HERE to view the entire reportClick HERE to view a larger version of the graphMonth-over-month in January, the number bankruptcy filings declined by 6.4 percent from the total of 6,090 that was reported for December. However, there were 20 filing days in January compared to 22 in December, meaning that if the filings continued at January’s daily rate of 2,952, January’s total would have surpassed December’s.January’s filing total of slightly more than 59,000 is 22 percent less than 2014’s monthly average of 75,840.The two states with the most overall bankruptcy filings for January were California (6,133) and Florida (4,476). Those two states accounted for 18 percent of all of the nation’s bankruptcy filings for the month. The leading states in bankruptcy filings per capita for January were Tennessee, with 5.25 filings for every 1,000 people, and Alabama, with 4.61 for every thousand. Tennessee and Alabama led the nation in 2014 in bankruptcy filings per capita with 5.28 and 5.24, respectively. The national average for January 2015 was 2.28 filings for every 1,000, a decline from 2014’s overall rate of 2.93.Epiq Systems is a leading global provider of technology-enabled solutions for electronic discovery, bankruptcy and class action administration. Top legal professionals depend on us for deep subject-matter expertise and years of firsthand experience working on many of the largest, most high-profile and complex client engagements. Epiq Systems, Inc. has locations in the United States, Europe and Asia. AACER Bankruptcies Bankruptcy Filings Epiq 2015-02-09 Brian Honea The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agolast_img read more

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English Premier League Standings

first_imgPoint STANDINGSPOS LP CLUB P W D L GF GA GD PTS1 (3) Arsenal 16 10 3 3 29 13 16 332 (1) Man City 16 10 2 4 32 17 15 323 (2) Leicester 15 9 5 1 32 21 11 324 (4) Man U 16 8 5 3 21 12 9 295 (5) Tottenham 16 6 8 2 26 14 12 266 (6) Crystal P 16 8 2 6 21 15 6 267 (7) Watford 16 7 4 5 18 16 2 258 (8) West Ham 16 6 6 4 25 21 4 249 (10) Liverpool 16 6 6 4 20 19 1 2410 (9) Everton 16 5 8 3 29 21 8 2311 (11) Stoke City 16 6 5 5 13 14 -1 2312 (12) S.hampton 16 5 6 5 21 19 2 2113 (13) West Brom 16 5 5 6 16 21 -5 2014 (14) Bournem 16 4 4 8 20 31 -11 1615 (18) Newcastle 16 4 4 8 18 31 -13 1616 (15) Chelsea 15 4 3 8 17 24 -7 1517 (16) Swansea 16 3 5 8 15 24 -9 1418 (17) Norwich 16 3 5 8 18 28 -10 1419 (19) Sunderland 16 3 3 10 17 30 -13 1220 (20) Aston Villa 16 1 3 12 13 30 -17 6last_img read more

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GPL still awaiting “parts” to fix damaged submarine cable one month later

first_imgDamaged submarine cableAs power outages continue to plague several parts of the country, the Guyana Power and Light (GPL) has said it is awaiting a “part” to rectify its submarine cable which was damaged over a month ago by a vessel in the Demerara River.Compromised section of the 69 kV submarine cableThe barge involved in the incidentThis was revealed to Guyana Times on Tuesday by a credible source attached to the power agency.The source could not state where the material is being sourced from, neither could she state when it is expected to be in Guyana. There has been no word about when the part will arrive since most of the persons involved are tightlipped.The 13.8kV submarine cable, which rests along the upper Demerara River within proximity of Craig, East Bank Demerara, was dislodged by a barge sailing along the Demerara River at around 04:23h on June 6, 2019.As a result of this incident, West Demerara customers from Vriesland to La Retraite were without electricity until 07:46h, while efforts were underway to alternatively power these customers from the Vreed-en-Hoop Substation.Officials from the China Machinery Import and Export Corporation (CMC) were a part of the GPL efforts to retrieve and examine the submarine cable.Both entities are also engaged in discussions regarding establishing improved maritime conduct within proximity of the submarine cables.Another submarine cable across the Demerara River linking the Vreed-en-Hoop and Kingston power plants was also damaged four days before the other cable was restored about two weeks later. GPL had warned, however, that residents along the West Coast of Demerara may not be relieved of power failures just yet.In a statement to the media, GPL explained, “…customers on the West Bank and West Coast Demerara may experience periods of service interruptions as the Vreed-en-Hoop plant, which is now operating in an isolated mode, is not as stable as when it was interconnected to the rest of the DBIS (Demerara-Berbice Interconnected System)”.The routing and laying of the new cable were done with the aid of the Maritime Administration Department (MARAD), Gaico Construction Services and staff from GPL’s Project Management Department, Engineering Services, System Planning and Designs, Network Operations and System Control and Engineering Services departments.MARAD will be responsible for ensuring the safety of the cable from potential damage by oceangoing vessels, even as plans are afoot to have it laid at least three metres beneath the riverbed.In the meantime, the new 13.8 kV cable will be providing over 5 MW of power to the Eastern DBIS.“It spans approximately 4000 feet from Princess Street, Georgetown, to the GPL power station at Vreed-en-Hoop, West Coast Demerara.last_img read more

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7 super SF Bay Area things to do this weekend,

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having trouble viewing these photos on a mobile deviceThe rain is a distant memory (for now) but many around these parts are getting ready for the ice — as in the big NHL All-Star Game in San Jose. But there’s plenty of ways to have fun around these parts whether you’re a hockey fan or not. Here are seven great ways to spend this weekend in the S.F. Bay Area and beyond, from watching Richard Nixon (well, a fake Richard Nixon) duke it out with a perky TV host to a host of …last_img read more

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a month agoWoodward: Man Utd committed to youth policy

first_imgWoodward: Man Utd committed to youth policyby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United vice-chairman Ed Woodward insists they’re committed to providing the right investment for the first team.United announced a record revenue of £627.1million on Tuesday, with the release of their annual financial figures.“We remain focused on our plan of rebuilding the team and continuing to strengthen our youth system, in line with the philosophy of the club and the manager,” said Woodward.”This is reflected in the recent addition of three exciting first team players, key player contract extensions and the talent we have coming through our Academy.”Everyone at Manchester United is committed to delivering on our primary objective of winning trophies.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Police wanted to obtain video of teens suicide but coroner wouldnt pay

first_imgKenneth JacksonAPTN News SaturdayAn Ontario coroner wouldn’t pay to unlock the iPod of a 15-year-old girl who used it to film her suicide inside a Sioux Lookout foster home despite police wanting to secure it as evidence, according to Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) documents.And if the parents of the Ojibway teenager put up any fuss they could pay to have the video removed before the device was returned to them the coroner told investigators.Or they could let the OPP wipe the device – deleting the video and everything else on the iPod.That girl was Kanina Sue Turtle.She hanged herself Oct. 29, 2016.“Dr. (Michael) Wilson was consulted about the fee to Cellbrite (sic), and he advised the coroner’s office will not pay this fee,” says OPP notes of the Nov. 2, 2016 conversation with the regional coroner out of Thunder Bay.“Coroner requests to keep the device and if the family demands its return, the family can pay the fee to remove the video, or agree to allow police wipe the device.”Cellebrite is an Israeli company that specializes in data extraction from mobile devices, particularly Apple, and is commonly used by law enforcement in Canada.Investigators knew Turtle had filmed her suicide because Const. David Laviolette watched it as one of the first responders to Turtle’s death.Laviolette made notes of what he saw but then the device apparently “timed out” and locked according to Chief Coroner Dirk Huyer.Huyer wouldn’t respond directly to questions about the coroner’s investigation into Turtle’s death.“If the question had come to me, generally speaking, I would not be advocating for the family to pay for something,” said Huyer.The iPod remained with the coroner’s office for months.Then in May 2017 APTN first learned of Turtle’s death and spoke to her parents who said at the time they didn’t believe she killed herself.Clarence and Barbara Suggashie also said then, about six months after Turtle’s death, they didn’t have their daughter’s autopsy report.But they had filed a Freedom of Information request with the Ontario government to get the OPP’s police report into Turtle’s death.They got the report last summer, right around the same time Huyer said he ensured the family got the iPod, too.“I facilitated the family getting the iPod back to them. That’s how they got it back,” he said.Unlike police, the family was able to figure out the iPod’s passcode.That’s when they finally believed their daughter died by suicide because they watched the video.Suggashie would sleep with the device every night for months afterwards.The parents saw in the video what APTN News first reported in February: Turtle was left alone for 45 minutes before anyone in the foster home came to check on her.By the time a worker did, it was far too late for Turtle who was “chronically” suicidal according to her post-mortem report.At the time of her death, she had “hundreds” of cuts all over her body from self-harming.“The Occurrence report records that this woman had some self-inflicted type wounds to her arms. However, at autopsy, she had enumerable (hundreds) of fresh superficial self-inflicted type wounds to all limbs,” says the post-mortem report.She also had multiple hospital visits in the days before her death and the device had more videos – videos the police could have found if they accessed the device.Turtle had attempted to die by suicide the day before and filmed it as well. She also had a video of another foster child trying to kill herself just a few days before that.Barbara and Clarence Suggashie holding a picture of their late daughter Kanina Sue Turtle about six months after her death. At the time they didn’t believe she died by suicide.So how was Turtle left alone?What went wrong?Those are questions Turtle’s parent’s keep asking all these months later.“I wish someone would reach out to me and say the truth,” said Barbara Suggashie, who lives in Poplar Hill First Nation near the Manitoba and Ontario border.Suggashie has told APTN she believes Tikinagan Child and Family Services is hiding something.Tikinagan owns and operates the home that Turtle died in. It’s still being used by the agency.Up until this week Tikinagan wouldn’t answer any of APTN’s questions citing privacy, and sometimes didn’t respond to emails at all.“I can verify that Tikinagan has spoken with Barbara in the past and answered her questions. We will be reaching out privately to her again because we prefer to offer information and support personally to families,” said spokesperson Irene Dube.Suggashie said this isn’t true.In fact, last month in Sioux Lookout Suggashie, with her son Winter, 12, by her side, said she asked Tikinagan again why Turtle was left alone. Both Suggashie and her son said they never got a response.Turtle’s police report is partially redacted, meaning portions have been deleted.That’s information relating to Tikinagan.That means if police asked Tikinagan why Turtle was left alone for 45 minutes or what level of care was she supposed to be getting her parents don’t know because Tikinagan exercised a third-party clause that allowed them to keep that from the parents.“Tikinagan is prohibited by law from disclosing personal information except in limited circumstances. Tikinagan staff and the foster parent chose to have their personal and identifiable information redacted, which is their right. You also should know that Tikinagan was unaware of the source of the information request,” said Dube.The home where Kanina Sue Turtle died by suicide is owned and operated by Tikinagan Child and Family Services.Suggushie believes her last hope of finding out the truth is with the coroner’s office.Huyer is leading what he’s calling an “expert panel” review of 11 deaths between Jan. 1 2014 and July 31, 2017, that occurred with children in protective services and living in residential care, like foster and group homes.Seven of those deaths were Indigenous children, including Turtle.Of the 11 deaths under review, seven were suicides, one homicide and all had a history of mental health challenges, according to the terms of reference provided by the coroner’s office.The terms also further outline the causes that sparked the review.They include potentially being placed in the wrong homes based on the children’s needs, training and qualifications of caregivers, availability of treatment and the oversight provided by children’s aid societies.It also found concerns with the ministry of Children and Youth Services’ oversight of the placements.Huyer said the review is in the final stages and should be released later this summer.The coroner’s office did finally get a copy of the suicide video when Huyer met with Turtle’s parents this past January as part of the expert panel [email protected][email protected]last_img read more

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Blame it on the proverbial foreign hand

first_imgTHE most powerful, though never sighted, political unifier in India is back: the foreign hand. The National Democratic Alliance government recently went after the Ford Foundation for funding “political” and “disruptive” activities. And hardly a few hours after the announcement, it cancelled the registration of nearly 9,000 non-government organisations (NGOs) for violating the rules governing foreign funds. At the same time, it stopped a Greenpeace activist from flying abroad to make a presentation on how a community is fighting a coal mine project in the country. Also Read – Gateway of criminal justicePursuing this obsession, the Union Environment Minister has publicly said that the recent focus on air pollution in Delhi is part of a “design” to malign the country. The Union minister cited a “foreign hand” because the air pollution data came from machines installed at an embassy. He has questioned why nobody talked about air pollution in the capital in the past 10 years. It is another matter that hardly a day goes by without the newspapers carrying a story on Delhi’s alarming air pollution. Also Read – Turning a blind eyeThis is not the first government that is obsessed with the foreign hand theory. Former Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, attributed “foreign hand” to the anti-nuclear campaigns. And when his government was shrouded with corruption charges that led to its miserable fall in the general elections next year, Singh’s key ministers questioned civil society groups and their intentions citing foreign funds. This was surprising because there was a period when the government was seen as “NGO-wallas” due to its leadership’s engaging relationship with civil society. Equally surprising is the current government’s actions against NGOs and donors because, as stated by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his ministers, its focus is on salvaging the image of the country in the international arena. Then why would the government risk going after a US charity that has the potential of diplomatic fallout? The Ford Foundation has also helped implement many government schemes, including a few flagship schemes in Gujarat, when Modi was its chief minister.This is where the larger question of intent comes. The Union government took action against Ford Foundation after the Gujarat government complained that the foundation supported a few activists who were campaigning against the state’s involvement in the 2002 communal riots. Similarly, the NGOs that were forced to shut shop were mostly opposing mining and industry projects and fighting for the legitimate rights of communities.The political leadership wants to polarise the development discourse in the country by hitting out at any NGO that is protesting development projects. And the leadership seems to be successful as whenever genuine environmental concerns are raised, it automatically ends in a debate over development v environment. At a time when the middle class is calling the political shots, development has taken precedence over the environment. The growth rate has to be revived and the government has conveniently made us believe that the growth is not happening because of opposition to projects on environmental concerns. A polarised discourse is easy to manage, at least while dealing with daily anti-government headlines, according to former BJP minister Arun Shourie. The current leadership believes it will be able to salvage its image through this. But the point it misses is that polarisation is an enemy in the long-term. The government might be able to slow down NGOs but what will it do when people come out on the streets to protect their rights. That is a much bigger and difficult headline to manage. DOWN TO EARTHlast_img read more

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