Boeing will need ‘several quarters’ to return 737 Max fleet to skies

first_imgBoeing suspended production of its best-selling aircraft in January, 10 months after regulators grounded the plane following two fatal crashes linked to a software issue. The company said last week it had discovered another software problem on the plane, but still aims to get the jet flying again by mid-2020, a deadline it previously said includes room for additional flaws.The time needed to return the Max fleet to service, before Boeing picks up the pace of production, will do little to ease pressure on Boeing’s suppliers.Spirit AeroSystems Holdings, a maker of fuselage, engine pylons and wing components which depends on the Max for half of its sales, has slashed its dividend to preserve cash and laid off 2,800 employees. Supplier United Technologies has said sales and profit will take a hit this year from the crisis that has engulfed the Max.One key element of returning the jet to service is training pilots on simulators. While countries like India have advised Boeing to set up simulators locally, Tinseth on Tuesday said existing equipment should cover all training requirements.“The training that will be linked to the Max is manageable with the simulators that are in the market,” Tinseth said. “If we look at the footprint today that we see in the market, we look at the retraining that is going to be needed to bring those planes back into the marketplace, we’re OK.”Topics : Boeing said it will take “several quarters” to return the global 737 Max fleet to the skies following a grounding that has left about 700 planes on the tarmac.“We are not going to over-stress the system,“ Randy Tinseth, Boeing’s vice president for marketing, said in an interview Tuesday at the Singapore Airshow.The Chicago-based manufacturer will first ensure the 400 planes with customers and the 300 more stored in factories are flying again before ramping up production, Tinseth said. “The process of doing this will take several quarters,” he said.last_img read more

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Dodgers’ Kenley Jansen taken to hospital with irregular heartbeat

first_img How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies “We’re trying not to get ahead of ourselves,” Zaidi said. “We’ll know more tomorrow.”Left-hander Scott Alexander pitched the ninth inning Thursday and earned the save in Jansen’s absence.Jansen has a 2.15 ERA and 32 saves in 51 appearances this season.Related Articles Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco DENVER — Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen was briefly hospitalized in Denver on Thursday afternoon due to “an episode with an irregular heartbeat.”Jansen was checked out and flew home later in the day. He is scheduled to be examined by his own cardiologist in Los Angeles on Friday, Dodgers GM Farhan Zaidi said following Thursday’s 8-5 victory over the Colorado Rockies.Jansen has a history with both an irregular heartbeat and high blood pressure. In October 2012, he had a catheter ablation procedure, a surgery during which abnormal tissue is cauterized to prevent the signals that trigger an irregular heartbeat.“He’s had some difficulty with altitude in the past,” Zaidi said. “His own cardiologist knows his history. He’ll be able to evaluate this and give us some perspective.” Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Jansen missed time in both the 2011 and 2012 seasons due to atrial fibrillation, episodes that also involved visits to Coors Field and led to the surgery to address the irregular heartbeat. In June 2015, however, he missed another game in Denver when he was feeling ill and had concerns that it might be another episode of atrial fibrillation. He underwent tests including an electrocardiogram that showed his heart was in normal rhythm.Sign up for our Inside the Dodgers newsletter. Be the best Dodger fan you can be by getting daily intel on your favorite team. Subscribe here.“It gets you panicked a little bit,” Jansen said at the time of his anxiety about dealing with the altitude in Denver.Jansen never made it to the stadium on Thursday. After an early morning arrival from San Francisco, he was at the team hotel when he started feeling ill and contacted the team’s medical staff. He was taken to a local hospital where he was examined by a cardiologist and some abnormalities were detected in his heartbeat.“He was at the hotel and just didn’t feel right,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “Obviously there’s history with it. And any time you’re talking about the heart, you have to be careful with it. Then you have the altitude. That’s why we wanted to be proactive and get him back there.”Roberts acknowledged Jansen is not likely to rejoin the Dodgers for the rest of this weekend’s series. Beyond that, Zaidi would not speculate about the closer’s status.last_img read more

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Who are these makeshift Marlins and how are they leading the NL East?

first_imgAt this point in the season, almost two weeks after the first pitch was thrown of the 2020 MLB campaign, the NL East standings are a jumbled mess. The Braves and Mets have played 13 games each. The Nationals have played nine. The Marlins and Phillies have played only six. It’s bizarre. The division standings look like they belong to a recreational kickball league, where a couple of unlucky teams had too many 8 p.m. games on their schedules that were washed out by late, vindictive thunderstorms.  The strangest thing, though, just might be the fact that the Marlins — a team that lost 105 games last year and was projected to finish last in the division by pretty much everyone and the club that had 18 players test positive for COVID-19 a couple days into the season — are sitting up there in first place. Sure, it’s early. And sure, they’ve only played six games, but Miami is 5-1, a half-game ahead of the 8-5 Braves, 2 1/2 ahead of the 4-5 Nationals, 3 ahead of the 2-4 Phillies and 3 1/2 ahead of the 5-8 Mets. Will the success last? Who knows? And, frankly, who cares at this point? The Marlins’ 2020 story is already pretty fascinating. So let’s take a look at these Marlins: What’s happened so far, who’s actually healthy and on the active roster and how in the world they’re off to a 5-1 start.MORE: MLB’s coronavirus rules, explainedCOVID roster complicationsWe have to start here, of course. The Marlins opened their season in Philadelphia, splitting the first two games. The club knew of positive tests before the third game, but the team voted via text messages to play anyway — yikes — and beat the Phillies, 11-6, on Sunday, July 26. Turns out, the problem was much more widespread than they had feared. The final count had 18 players — of the 30-man roster — testing positive for the coronavirus. They wouldn’t play again until Aug. 4, but more on that in a moment. Losing that many players to the virus meant the roster had to be overhauled. These 11 players were placed on the injured list on Aug. 4: pitchers Sandy Alcantara, Jeff Brigham, Robert Dugger, Yimi García, Nick Neidert, Ryne Stanek, Adam Conley and Caleb Smith, along with position players Chad Wallach, Sean Rodríguez and Miguel Rojas.Yeah. And this litany of corresponding moves to fill out the active roster happened the same day. Today’s Roster Update: pic.twitter.com/reqvTIywnD— Miami Marlins (@Marlins) August 4, 2020Sheesh. FAGAN: Cardinals’ COVID-19 outbreak won’t stop MLB season, but is needed wake-up callCOVID schedule complicationsThe Marlins were supposed to return home after the Philly series for a quick two-game set against the Orioles. Then, after two games in Baltimore, it was supposed to be back home for three against the Nationals and three against the Phillies. The Orioles games — in Florida and in Maryland — were postponed, as was the series in Miami against the Nationals, as the Marlins remained sequestered in their hotel in Philadelphia. And then the schedule was altered so that, instead of playing the Phillies at home (as originally planned) Aug. 4-6, the Marlins trekked to Baltimore to make up the four games against the Orioles — with the Marlins technically as the home team for two of them, meaning they hit in the bottom of each inning. They’ll play the fourth game on Thursday evening, then play three in New York against the Mets, then two in Buffalo against the Blue Jays. The series against psuedo-Toronto is sandwiched between two off days, which will be welcome. Then, finally, they’re scheduled to host the Braves — in Miami — for three games starting Aug. 14. If you’ve been following along, you realize that’s 11 games to start the season played in road ballparks, but more importantly 21 days away from home. Yikes. MORE: MLB is learning to cope with COVID-19’s speed and deception, but is it too late?So how are they 5-1?Even though the Marlins lost 105 games last year — 13 more than any other NL squad — and even though they were picked to finish last in the NL East by pretty much everyone, there were reasons for optimism this year. The PECOTA projections, for example, still projected them to finish last in the NL East, but with 71 wins, a big jump from 57 last year. So there’s talent building in the organization. But, again, of the 11 players placed on the injured list, eight of them were pitchers. Somehow, though, in the first three games in Baltimore, the Marlins pitchers held the Orioles to a single run over 23 innings (two seven-inning double-headers in that mix). The staff’s scoreless streak reached 21 innings before the Orioles finally pushed across a single run in the sixth inning of the third game. Five of the pitchers acquired/called up on the Aug. 4 flurry combined to throw 6 1/3 innings in the three games, with only one run allowed. “Our pitching has been incredible,” young Marlins veteran Brian Anderson told reporters. “I don’t know how they go from throwing into a (hotel) mattress to going out and getting big league hitters out like that, but whatever they’re doing we’ve got to keep doing it.”And when your pitchers allow one run in three games, it’s pretty easy to win all three games. Olympic Eddy has arrivedThe Aug. 4 flurry of moves featured interesting names, including two pitchers named Josh Smith, and Monte Harrison, a top prospect in the Marlins’ organization who is also the brother of NBA guard Shaquille Harrison.Man…where do I start lol…not how I visioned it starting off lolol but the nerves running through my body I’ve never felt before….the Excited/Anxious/Nervous/Bubble Guts feeling of stepping on the field…I’m so blessed/Honored to get to step foot on a Big League field.— Monte’ Harrison3️⃣ (@Team_Harrison3) August 5, 2020But the most fascinating story belongs to Eddy Alvarez. Before he started on his journey to the majors, the now 30-year-old rookie was an Olympic speed-skater. Alvarez, who is from Miami — not exactly a speed-skating hotspot — made the 2014 U.S. Olympic team and was part of the silver-medal winning 5,000-meter relay squad.  “Baseball is my true passion,” Alvarez told Sports Illustrated recently. “Skating was more of a short-term goal.”Alvarez started his baseball journey after the Olympics, signing with the White Sox as a 24-year-old amateur free agent in June 2014. He played five years in that organization, spending the 2018 season at Triple-A Charlotte, where he posted a .783 OPS and eight homers in 101 games. Late in March of 2019, the Marlins purchased Alvarez, and he thrived with his new franchise.  Alvarez, in 66 games at Triple-A New Orleans, batted .323, hit 12 homers and stole 12 basesWhen he made his big-league debut in Baltimore (he went 0-for-5 in the games), Alvarez became the first Winter Olympics medalist ever to play in an MLB contest. That’s pretty darn amazing, in any year.last_img read more

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9 shot dead in 2 gunbattles in Mexicos Sonora state

first_img Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility (Pexels) Here’s how to repair and patch damaged drywall Mesa family survives lightning strike to home Top Stories 19 Comments   Share   About two hours later, more gunfire erupted on a highway in nearby Naco. Four men were found shot dead in a car with Arizona license plates. A 12-year-old boy was wounded by a stray bullet but his life was not in danger.Police were investigating whether the incidents were linked. Sponsored Stories Natural spring cleaning tips and tricks for your home New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies Men’s health affects baby’s health too MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexican authorities say nine people were killed and a child wounded in two gunbattles in the northern border state of Sonora.State prosecutors say in a statement Tuesday that the first firefight took place the previous afternoon in Agua Prieta, which lies across the border from Douglas, Arizona.Four men and a woman were found dead in two cars and lying on a street. Some were clad in tactical vests, and assault rifles were recovered at the scene. How men can have a healthy 2019last_img read more

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