‘One Night’ director talks Andy Ruiz Jr.-Anthony Joshua documentary, working with Mike Tyson, untold Ruiz story

first_imgTo discuss the inner workings of “One Night,” Sporting News spoke with the director of the documentary, Academy Award-winning for her work on ESPN’s 30-for-30 series, Deirdre Fenton.She also discusses working with Tyson and Stallone and shares a story about Ruiz that didn’t make the final cut.(Editor’s note: This interview was edited for clarity and length.)Join DAZN to watch Ruiz vs. Joshua 2 & 100+ fight nights a yearSporting News: When you were asked to lead this documentary, what were your initial thoughts?Deirdre Fenton: Well, I was actually pretty excited. I come from 30-for-30, so I’m used to doing things that took place 30, 40 years ago. It is hard to chase after footage from that time (laughs). It was a blast because it was an embarrassment of riches with different angles from broadcast cameras, the Sky (Sports) broadcast, the Spanish broadcast. I just had so much to work with, and that was new for me. And that was super cool.SN: I would assume that makes your job that much easier?DF: It is because you get more genuine reactions from people. I think one of the benefits of doing something that happened a while ago is people really have a chance to formulate their thoughts on it. With something like this, it is the power of sports. People have that reaction to watching Ruiz win because it’s the story of the underdog pulling through to win, and seeing people have that excitement for Andy was really cool.SN: How many times did you watch the fight to formulate the concept of the documentary?DF: I watched the fight a bunch. But what I also tried to do is watch the interviews with “AJ” and Andy from around the fight because that gave me a really good idea of who they were, and that’s how I wanted to start it. I wanted to let them shine as characters. The majority of the film is the fight and people reacting to what’s happening. At the basis of it, it’s two boxers. Even though “AJ” is the overwhelming favorite, he’s not a villain. He’s a fan favorite. I didn’t want that to come across as such. I wanted people to see he has feelings too and where things went wrong for him.SN: This wasn’t your typical 30-for-30 to where you had all this time to get it done. The turnaround had to be quick, considering the first fight was in June, and the rematch is taking place on Dec. 7. What comes about in formulating the game plan to get a quality documentary combined with finding the right people to tell the story?DF: Bringing (Sylvester) Stallone in as an EP was really a gamechanger. He came on, I think, in September. He’s amazing. He’s the best at telling these boxing stories. But then he was able to help us get Tyson, Strahan, Holyfield and Dolph. You can’t take your eyes off of Mike Tyson in this. He’s just so funny, engaging. The challenge was we only got those interviews about two-and-half, three weeks ago. The challenge is that restructuring around those pivotal interviews.SN: Watching the documentary, Mike Tyson really stood out more than anybody else. What was it like working with him?DF: First of all, he likes to have salted peanuts and blueberries on hand. He even asked if he could take the peanuts with him when he was done. I was like, ‘Sure, champ. They’re all yours.’ Tyson doesn’t do a lot of interviews. I think the difference maker for this was Slyvester Stallone. He would tell him to use his hands and be animated. That’s where Sly helped not make the project, but make that interview specifically. I think people underestimate how smart he is. When you do an interview with him, he’s talking about quotes from the Bible, for some reason, telling us about the history of syphilis. He’s an incredibly smart guy.SN: Do you think the documentary would have had that little extra punch without Mike Tyson?DF: I don’t think so. But I think you could say that about a couple of the interviews. The thing about Tyson is that you can’t take your eyes off of him. Every time he comes in, he’s in soundbites that are perfectly suited for this type of format.SN: In terms of formatting, how do you know that you are good and it’s done precisely the way you want it to be?DF: I think when you first start reading the reviews (laughs). I think when you are in my position, and you’re living and breathing this, you kind of start of feeling like you’re a little too close to it. I trust the reaction of people I trust like my colleagues at DAZN because you are obsessing about clipping someone’s sound bite, you get a little lost.SN: How much of the final editing process involved you and Sylvester Stallone?DF: Would you believe he actually called my cell phone and gave me notes for 30 minutes last week? We engaged him because he’s one of the best storytellers in boxing. No one can do it better. You never know what you’re going to get from celebrity EPs. What we got from him is someone who was completely engaged throughout the entire process. He gave notes. He provided feedback. Ultimately, both of those things helped make it better. He’s a great teammate to have. “One Night,” the documentary analyzing the June 1 heavyweight title clash between Andy Ruiz Jr. and Anthony Joshua, debuted Thursday night on DAZN.The documentary, which has Sylvester Stallone as its executive producer, shows Ruiz pulling off one of the biggest upsets in boxing history when he dethroned Joshua to become the unified heavyweight champion of the world. The documentary also has interviews with the likes of former undisputed heavyweight champions Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield and James “Buster” Douglas along with former NFL star Michael Strahan and actor and Stallone rival in “Rocky IV”, Dolph Lundgren. SN: Now that’s it completed, and you have had time to think about it, what’s the one thing you wish would have been on there that didn’t end up making the final cut?DF: We were very limited because it is so close to the fight and the fact Ruiz came out of nowhere, and no one had really heard of him, I went down to Guadalajara and visited Ruiz’s camp. Some of the stories I heard from there really didn’t fit what we were doing — just hearing how close Ruiz was to quitting before the first “AJ” fight and the (Joseph) Parker fight (only loss of his career in December 2016). He was really close to giving up and doing something else. I wish there was a way to include some of that in the film, and we couldn’t figure it out.last_img read more

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WR coach heads to LSU

first_imgUCLA coach Karl Dorrell’s latest edition of remaking his staff is not done yet. Receivers coach D.J. McCarthy, who spent one season with the Bruins, became the third offensive assistant coach to leave UCLA after he accepted a job for the same position at LSU, sources said Tuesday. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! McCarthy came to Westwood after two seasons at Central Florida. He tutored a UCLA receiving group that struggled with consistency throughout a 7-6 season. If Dorrell wants to look within the UCLA family for a replacement, a possibility is former Crenshaw High assistant coach Eric Scott. Scott was a part-time intern with the program last season, and is viewed as an up-and-coming assistant. Scott also has UCLA ties. After originally attending Northwestern, the former receiver transferred to UCLA. – Brian Dohn center_img McCarthy joins offensive line coach Jim Colletto and offensive coordinator Jim Svoboda as assistants to leave after last season. Colletto took a job with the NFL’s Detroit Lions. Svoboda was fired. last_img read more

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Murders, suicide linked to finances

first_imgThe commotion attracted Alvarado, who said his cousin called him over. Using a flashlight, Alvarado also looked through the window and saw the girl in her bed, with blood around her head, he said. He and two others broke through the front door. In addition to the girl in an upstairs bedroom, Alvarado said he found a man dead on a sofa, his head leaning back. “I just ran downstairs,” he said. “I didn’t want to look no more.” The bodies of the girl and her mother were both found in their beds, and they might have been sleeping when they were shot, Peavy said. The grandfather’s body was found on a chair in the living room, with a self-inflicted gunshot wound and a handgun in his hand, Peavy said. On Wednesday, police tape was strung across the front door of the home, and mangled blinds were visible through the window. Neighbors said the family, who lived at River Ranch Townhomes, had received eviction notices, and the grandfather was upset about it. “All indications are that he was going through some difficult times financially, and that might have caused the whole thing,” Peavy said. Neighbors spoke of the family on Wednesday, of little Angelica, whom they said was an active girl, with shoulder-length dark-blond hair. Michele Perez, 34, who lives nearby, said she often saw the girl and her grandfather together. “They were always happy, they were always out by the pool, he was always taking her swimming and jumping rope around here,” she said. Some neighbors said they heard what sounded like gunshots at 4:30 a.m. Tuesday. Sheriff’s deputies responded to a report of two to three gunshots called in by a resident in the area, said Lt. Brenda Cambra, a spokeswoman for the sheriff’s Santa Clarita station. The deputies arrived 10 minutes later, but didn’t see or hear anything more, or locate the source of the gunshots, Cambra said. Sheriff’s deputies came back to the town home Tuesday night, after neighbors discovered the bodies. “The lady next door said they’re not going to knock down the door, they’re going to come by and patrol the area, which makes perfect sense,” said Rhonda Robb, 27, a receptionist who just moved into the neighborhood Tuesday with her boyfriend, Alvarado. River Ranch has gated entrances and maintenance employees who drive around in golf carts. There is a pool near the leasing office, and the wheat-colored town homes have balconies and face neatly clipped lawns. Finding his neighbors’ bodies was the worst thing he has ever seen, Alvarado said. Robb said she could not sleep Tuesday night because of the grisly discovery almost next door from where she just moved in. “I just hope the best for whatever family they do have left,” she said. [email protected] (661) 257-5253 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “It’s unbelievable,” a grim-faced Alvarado, 22, said Wednesday morning. “I just couldn’t believe it, seeing a little girl like that.” Authorities determined that Richard Boyd Burton, 52, shot his daughter, Crystal Marie Burton, 24, and his granddaughter, Angelica, said Craig Harvey, a spokesman for the county Coroner’s Office. Burton then turned the gun on himself, Harvey said. The bodies were found about 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at the town home on Annes Circle Drive, just outside Santa Clarita. Angelica’s friends went to find her when she didn’t show up for a planned sleepover, said Capt. Ray Peavy of the sheriff’s Homicide Unit. Neighbors say the girls, accompanied by a mother, knocked on the window and threw rocks onto the balcony to try to get their friend’s attention, but got no response. CANYON COUNTRY – Four little girls searching for their friend tossed rocks at her balcony Tuesday night, then peeked through her bedroom window. What was soon discovered rocked the Santa Clarita Valley on Wednesday as details unfolded of the worst homicide in years in a town that touts its low crime rate. Using a flashlight, the youngsters saw their friend, 8-year-old Angelica Maldonado, lying motionless, blood around her head, and yelled out. Rudy Alvarado, a neighbor in this gated town-home complex in Canyon Country, forced his way inside, where he found Angelica dead. She was one of three people killed in what sheriff’s homicide detectives believe was a murder-suicide in a family facing financial troubles. last_img read more

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