International Ag Celebration

first_imgSince its inception in 2007, breeders at the West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI) in Ghana have produced 23 new varieties of corn, seven new varieties of peanuts, 11 new varieties of rice and seven new varieties of sweet potato.But the center’s most meaningful contribution to the future of African agriculture and food security are the 66 new doctorates in plant breeding the institution has trained in that time, said Eric Danquah, a plant breeder who founded the center at the University of Ghana.“(This collection of new varieties) is the outcome of training Africans in Africa to work with African crops for Africa,” Danquah, told a crowd gathered Wednesday at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ annual International Agriculture Day celebration.Danquah attended graduate school in plant breeding at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom before returning to Ghana to teach and conduct research. He was continuously saddened, he said, by the fact that the brightest students that he taught at the University of Ghana would leave for graduate school and not return home to work.Losing great scientists to universities in America or Europe often meant that crops important to African farmers were not given the same attention in plant breeding programs. Scientists working in Africa are more aware of the trials faced by farmers on the continent and what kinds of seeds would do well in the African market.Danquah knew “a green revolution for Africa” wouldn’t be possible without researchers working in Africa with easy access to African crops and African farms.“In a number of places, you just don’t find the needed critical mass of scientists,” he said.Without the scientific community as a bedrock, private seed companies don’t consider large investments for commercialization infrastructure, and funding agencies are less likely to award research grants, Danquah said, adding that the scientific community being created through WACCI is one of the most important catalysts for agricultural development in Africa.“What is important about our program is that they’ve all gone back to their home institutions,” Danquah said. “We are building capacity in Africa for Africa.” He encouraged students and researchers at UGA to visit the University of Ghana to study or collaborate. For more information about WACCI, visit wacci.ug.edu.gh.In addition to Danquah’s talk, students and faculty at the celebration heard from 2019 CAES graduate Sarah Spradlin, who will receive degrees in agriscience and environmental systems and international affairs and the CAES Certificate in International Agriculture. She spoke about her time interning on the farm that serves UGA’s campus in Costa Rica. Those gathered also recognized this year’s winners of the CAES Agriculture Abroad Photo Contest.Dung Tran, a doctoral student in the CAES Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics won first place with her photo, “Happy H’Mong Farmer in the Corn Field.” Tran, who worked in plant conservation in Vietnam, took the photo on a seed collecting trip.Each family in this region of the country grows their own heirloom corn variety, Tran said. Tran met the farmer in the photo when she took Tran into her family’s field to collect seeds from her family’s variety of sticky corn.Other students recognized in the photo contest were Sujata Bogati, master’s degree student in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, with her second-place photo, “Agriculture in the Mountain Regions,” and Lauren Rutledge, an undergraduate student in the Department of Animal and Dairy Science, with her third-place photo, “Cacao? More like CaWOW!”The celebration was also a time to honor scholarship award winners and 2019 Certificate of International Agriculture graduates.Recipients of the 2019 Certificate of International Agriculture included:Alexandra Bull, bachelor’s degree in environmental economics and management, minors in environmental law and resource economics, and certificates in sustainability and international agricultureGrant Freeman, bachelor’s degree in biological sciences and minor in horticultureAbigail Pierce, bachelor’s degree in agricultural communication and certificates in local food systems and international agricultureSarah Spradlin, bachelor’s degrees in international affairs and agriscience and environmental systemsAshley Stone, master’s degree in natural resourcesMallory Warren, bachelor’s degree in environmental economics and management, minor in anthropology, and certificates in organic agriculture, sustainability and international agricultureRecipients of travel scholarships included:Virginia Childs, Kanemasu Global Engagement Award, bachelor’s degree student in food scienceThomas Woldu Assefa, Graduate International Travel Award, doctoral candidate in agricultural and applied economicsMatthew Aaron Bruce, Graduate International Travel Award, master’s degree student in crop and soil sciencesRachel Hampton, Graduate International Travel Award, master’s degree student in animal and dairy scienceAmelia Lovelace, Graduate International Travel Award, doctoral candidate in plant pathologyConnie Mou, Graduate International Travel Award, doctoral candidate in poultry sciencePietro Mendonca de Santis Sica; Global Food Security International Travel Scholarship, master’s degree student in crop and soil sciencesMaddison Holder, Veloso Wallick Graduate Scholarship, master’s degree student in agricultural and environmental educationSadie Lackey, Wen Willams International Travel Scholarship, bachelor’s degree student in agricultural communicationJacqueline Kessler, Broder-Ackerman Global Citizen Award, bachelor’s degree student in environmental and managementFor more information about CAES international collaboration and opportunities for CAES students to study and work abroad, visit global.uga.edu.For more photos from the event visit www.flickr.com.last_img read more

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Publix Announces Policy Requiring Face Coverings Inside All Stores

first_imgFlorida’s largest supermarket chain has a new policy as of next week, in the effort to fight the spread of the coronavirus.Beginning July 21, Publix will require all customers to wear a mask or some type of face covering while inside any of its stores.The Lakeland-based company posted the information on its website Thursday.Publix cited CDC guidelines for the change, and emphasized that face coverings must be worn over both the nose and mouth. The grocer has implemented other measures to help shoppers abide by social distancing, such as one-way aisles and marking off six-foot increments at the checkout aisles.Other businesses that already require face coverings include Target, Walmart and CVS.The CDC states on its website that “a cloth face covering may not protect the wearer, but it may keep the wearer from spreading the virus to others.”last_img read more

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Pizza Klatch Celebrates “A Slice of the Good Life” at February…

first_imgFacebook31Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Pizza Klatch“Pizza Klatch makes a difference in my week – someone is always there to listen.” – Pizza Klatch participantPizza Klatch will be serving up “A Slice of the Good Life” on February 4 at the Washington Center. The local non-profit’s third annual event of that name, this year’s fundraiser features renowned pianist/singer/songwriter Rufus Wainwright.Pizza Klatch’s “A Slice of the Good Life” fundraiser is scheduled for February 4. Photo courtesy: Pizza KlatchThe son of folk stars Loudon Wainwright III and Kate McGarrigle, mentee and close friend of Leonard Cohen, Grammy nominee Rufus Wainwright performs orchestral pop with hints of folk, rock and even opera. He is perhaps best known for his celebrated recreation of Judy Garland’s Carnegie Hall concert. He is coming to support LGBTQ+ youth through Pizza Klatch which provides weekly lunchtime support groups in 11 Thurston County High Schools. There will also be an online auction, pizza and fabulous schmoozing with wonderful people. Tickets are available online at the Washington Center for the Performing Arts website.“A Slice of the Good Life” is Pizza Klatch’s largest fundraiser of the year, helping the non-profit further its mission of supporting LGBTQ+ youth in Thurston County schools.  Funds help cover operating costs including the purchase of 60 pizzas per week for up to 300 participants.These are testimonials from youth who participate in Pizza Klatch, a simple and innovative program for supporting LGBTQ+ youth and their allies in Thurston County schools:“Sometimes we have fun, sometimes we talk about stuff that’s hard to talk to other people about.” “I can be who I am here.” “Pizza Klatch strengthened my decision to be an ally.”Pizza Klatch’s mission is to support LGBTQ+ youth and their method for doing so is surprisingly simple – hold support groups once a week during lunch, providing pizza and two trained facilitators. Each Klatch, defined as “a gathering characterized usually by informal conversation”, provides a confidential and safe environment within which participants can share life events, talk about difficult issues and gain support.Pizza Klatch provides lunchtime support meetings for LGBTQ+ youth throughout Thurston County high schools. Photo courtesy: Pizza KlatchFacilitators come with information on other relevant local organizations that serve youth, handing out flyers and phone numbers as needed. Groups are led by the needs of the youth participants, making each group unique. Because they work with each school’s counselors and staff to provide ongoing support for participants in need, Pizza Klatches have made an immense positive difference in the way students are supported during the remainder of the week, when Pizza Klatch facilitators are not onsite.“A Slice of the Good Life” event is on February 4, 2017. Doors open at 6:00 pm with a Silent Auction featuring a long list of great items, fun events and activities from local organizations, artists and individuals. The main stage lights up at 7:30 p.m. with Lee Callahan of KCBS Radio emceeing. Along with Rufus Wainwright’s performance, attendees will hear from youth speaking about the impact Pizza Klatch has had on them and their high school experience.Starting January 21, Silent Auction items will be available for online bidding. The organization Silent Auction Pro is hosting both the online and in-person auction for the event, including the option to pre-register and enable a faster checkout on the night of February 4.During the February 4 Gayla, Pizza Klatch youth will speak about the impact of the group on their lives. Photo courtesy: Pizza KlatchPizza Klatch is a 501(c)3 non-profit started in 2007 in response to a rash of suicides among LGBTQ+ youth in Thurston County. A group of concerned private therapists, community leaders and mental health professionals teamed up with the North Thurston School District to create an after-school support group for high school students who identify as LGBTQ+. Many of these youth had no other access to LGBTQ+ information or support, lived at home with unsupportive families or were not able to come out to their parents or classmates for fear of negative outcomes. In February of 2008, the support group moved to lunchtime and started providing pizza, allowing more students to attend. For more information about Pizza Klatch, please visit their website at http://PizzaKlatch.org.last_img read more

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In the mix: Ravi Shastri made an important request ahead of his selection as…

first_imgImage Courtesy: Indian ExpressAdvertisement 7fhms8NBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs38Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ea59k( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) hjjbsWould you ever consider trying this?😱13mdouCan your students do this? 🌚6dsq0Roller skating! Powered by Firework Ravi Shastri continued his tenure as the head coach of the Indian team after edging out from the other candidates which included Tom Moody and Robin Singh. Advertisement Image Courtesy: Indian ExpressAs part of the selection process, the candidates were required to go through an interview conducted by the Cricket Advisory Committee led by Kapil Dev. During the interview, Shastri was reportedly was asked about the fragile middle-order which led to India’s demise in the semi-final of the World Cup.As per the CAC members, Shastri answered the query by putting forth a request to be included in the selection meetings if selected. Until this point of time, only the captain is allowed to attend the selection meetings headed by MSK Prasad.  Here’s what the CAC members revealed:Advertisement “Shastri wasn’t amused with the fact that he was kept out of selection meetings from quite some time where only the captain sat with the selectors to pick the team,” a CAC member said. “He basically suggested the team management didn’t get the players they wanted in the middle order for the World Cup. Although the team management doesn’t have a vote in selection meetings, Shastri wants both the captain and coach’s inputs to be taken in selection meetings,” said another CAC member.Advertisement Read Also:Watch: How Steve Smith took the art of leaving the ball to a new levelRavindra Jadeja nominated for the prestigious Arjuna Award Advertisementlast_img read more

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