US – #WeeklyAddress: February 12 – 18: Press Secretary tells reporters they “put national security at risk”

first_img to go further Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says News June 3, 2021 Find out more News United StatesAmericas Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information News RSF_en June 7, 2021 Find out more WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists United StatesAmericas Below are the most notable incidents regarding threats to press freedom in the US during the week of February 12-18: Follow the news on United States NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say February 20, 2018 US – #WeeklyAddress: February 12 – 18: Press Secretary tells reporters they “put national security at risk” Organisation White House Press Secretary says reporters “put national security at risk” During a White House press briefing on February 12, Press Secretary Sarah Sanders blamed reporters for publishing classified information that “put[s] national security at risk”. The press briefing, which originally focused on President Trump’s infrastructure plan, led to questions over the recent accusations against former White House aide Rob Porter, who reportedly physically abused his ex-wives. Reporters attempted to question the White House about keeping Porter on as staff, despite reports that he never received full security clearance, and that chief of staff John F. Kelly knew about the reported abuse as early as fall of last year. Sanders lashed out against the media: “If you guys have real concerns about leaking out classified information, look around this room. You guys are the ones that publish classified information and put national security at risk that doesn’t come from this White House.” Sanders is known to get into quarrels with reporters during press briefings, accusing the press of intentionally “misleading the American people.” Washington Post reports it’s been more than 363 days since the president held a press conference The Washington Post reported on February 13 that President Trump has held only three press conferences since he won the Republican nomination in July 2016, and more than 360 days had elapsed since his last conference. One took place in July 2016 when Trump was a general-election candidate, another took place in January 2017 when Trump was president-elect, and the latest one was held in February 2017 just after Trump took office. However, Politico’s Jason Schwartz reported in October 2017 that President Trump is more media-accessible than former president Barack Obama; “Trump shun[s] the traditional, formal press conference normally associated with the presidency in favor of more freewheeling, impromptu exchanges.” Trump’s hostile attitude towards the press could account for his unwillingness to hold more regular news conferences. He has repeatedly criticized news outlets and individual journalists on Twitter, and even put out “fake news” awards at the beginning of last month. After new indictments were issued in relation to the Russia investigation, Trump goes on anti-media twitter tirade On February 17, President Trump went on a Twitter rampage against the media and how networks have been covering the recent Russia collusion updates. Trump was referring to the charges spelled out in a 37-page indictment issued on Friday against 13 Russian nationals and three businesses as a result of special counsel Robert Mueller’s ongoing investigation.Trump’s tweets targeted the “Fake News Media”. He also retweeted another anti-CNN cartoon that shows an elderly CNN anchor Wolf Blitzer continuing to report on the Russian collusion in 2038, without having proven anything to that effect. The Twitter account from which this cartoon originated was suspended, yet Trump’s retweet still remains on his feed.The United States ranks 43rd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index after falling 2 places in the last year.For the latest updates, follow RSF on twitter @RSF_en. News April 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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What were you doing on 18 September 2001?

first_img RSF_en Follow the news on Eritrea News Organisation Prisoner of Conscience Since 2001 – Why has Sweden not managed to bring Dawit Isaak home? News Eritrea cut itself off from the world five years ago today. While the world’s attention was still totally absorbed by the 9/11 attacks in New York and Washington of the previous week, President Issaias Afeworki shut down Eritrea’s privately-owned press on 18 September 2001. The round-ups began five days later. Hundreds of government opponents are still in prison. At least 13 journalists are still being held somewhere in the country’s detention centres. Reporters Without Borders calls on African newspapers to publish articles this week about what is one of Africa’s biggest political tragedies of the last 50 years.What were you doing on 18 September 2001?On that day you were probably still reeling from the horrific scenes of passenger jets being flown into the World Trade Centre in New York and the Pentagon in Washington. You were still discussing it with your family, friends and colleagues. And you had no idea that one of Africa’s biggest political dramas of the past half-century was unfolding in the continent’s northeastern corner, in a small country beside the Red Sea.On 18 September 2001, Eritrean President Issaias Afeworki ordered the closure of all of the privately-owned press, silencing all of the country’s independent publications in one fell swoop. Asmara, a city until then praised in songs for its dolce vita, was stunned. The raids began five days later, on 23 September. Within hours, the capital was turned into a hunting ground for the political police. Some of the country’s most brilliant journalists hid in cellars. Government opponents and presidential rivals were thrown into police trucks and locked up in the city’s police stations. Some had the courage and energy to flee on foot and eventually reached refugee camps in Sudan. Others, such as poet and playwright Fessehaye Yohannes, got tired of living like hunted animals and wanted to show their solidarity with their independent journalist colleagues, so they turned themselves in to the police. A former newspaper editor who is now a political refugee in Sweden says: “It was the end of all our hopes.”18-23 September 2001 – a black week in the history of press freedom in AfricaWhat happened to push Eritrea over the edge after a decade of independence? The president promised elections, but none were held. The president promised civil and political liberties, but the police targeted anyone on the least pretext. With the second war with Ethiopia barely over, the independent press relayed the calls for democratisation being made by 15 senior ruling party officials, known as the Group of 15. But all that came to a sudden end five years ago, on 18 September 2001.Since that date, nothing has happened in Eritrea without President Afeworki knowing about it. There are no longer any independent publications. For news, the population has to rely on Soviet-style government media and a few foreign radio stations whose signals can be received in Asmara.Along with the hundreds of government opponents, 13 journalists are languishing somewhere in the country’s prisons and detention centres. Their names are Dawit Isaac, Fessehaye Yohannes, Yusuf Mohamed Ali, Mattewos Habteab, Dawit Habtemichael, Medhanie Haile, Temesgen Gebreyesus, Emanuel Asrat, Said Abdulkader, Seyoum Tsehaye, Hamid Mohamed Said, Saidia Ahmed and Saleh Al Jezaeeri. The few Eritreans who have managed to flee the country after being released from detention say conditions are terrible. Prisoners are locked up in metal containers inside military camps. Some are tortured. Mercury is poured in their ears. None of them has been tried, or has seen a lawyer or has been allowed family visits. We do not even know if they are still alive. Each year, the government repeats that they are “traitors to the motherland” or “spies for Ethiopia.” Since 2001, parliamentarians have supposedly been preparing a report on their “crimes.”The Eritrean government no longer listens to anyone. Nobody has been able to make it see reason. Only international public opinion has enough influence to achieve this.Reporters Without Borders RSF urges Swedish judicial authorities to reverse Dawit Isaak decision EritreaAfrica April 14, 2021 Find out more January 13, 2021 Find out more to go further EritreaAfrica News Receive email alerts Eritrea cut itself off from the world five years ago today. While the world’s attention was still totally absorbed by the 9/11 attacks in New York and Washington of the previous week, President Issaias Afeworki shut down Eritrea’s privately-owned press on 18 September 2001. At least 13 journalists are still being held somewhere in the country’s detention centres. Swedish prosecutors again refuse to investigate Dawit Isaak case September 18, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 What were you doing on 18 September 2001? Reports Help by sharing this information October 27, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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