International Working Women’s Day: Celebrating liberation and revolution

first_imgDetroit Buffalo, N.Y. New York City Baltimore International Working Women’s Day is celebrated on March 8 in countries around the globe. Here in the United States, Workers World members helped organize and participated in activities in a number of cities, including those mentioned here.Workers World Party in Detroit hosted an International Working Women’s Day speakout for justice and revolution on March 10, Harriet Tubman Day. The heroic freedom fighter and abolitionist, born into slavery in Maryland on an unknown date, died on March 10, 1913. An engaging and political talk on Tubman was given by Wanda, an activist walker and poet. The audience also heard about the revolutionary origins and history of International Women’s Day in a talk by WWP youth organizer Jamie, with comments from other speakout participants.The highlight of the evening was the presentation of Warrior Woman awards by WWP leader Debbie Johnson to three African-American workers, retirees and organizers. Lula Millender, Margaret Harris and Yvonne Jones were honored for their tireless commitment to the struggles of Detroiters and the oppressed worldwide. Their dedication includes passing out thousands of flyers, picketing the banks and eviction courts countless times, and raising money to help continue the ongoing struggle against austerity and racism led by their organization, the Moratorium Now! Coalition to Stop Foreclosures, Evictions & Utility Shutoffs.The Women’s Fightback Network-Maryland/D.C. gathered for a celebration of IWWD in Baltimore at People’s Park on Charles Street and then marched to an indoor dinner and rally. The keynote speaker was Takiyah Thompson, the Durham, N.C., freedom fighter charged in 2017 with taking down a Confederate statue outside the Durham County Courthouse. That action came three days after neo-fascists and KKK members assaulted anti-racist demonstrators in Charlottesville, Va., killing activist Heather Hyer. Thompson’s arrest, along with other freedom fighters in Durham, sparked months of rallies, marches and acts of solidarity. Their slogan, “Fighting racism is not a crime,” was successfully upheld when all were acquitted or had their charges dropped on Feb. 20.For International Working Women’s Day in Buffalo, N.Y., women’s rights and women’s liberation supporters from several groups defied a snowstorm to demand justice for Indigenous, Black and Brown women; full access to health care, including the choice of abortion, for all women; an end to racism and violence against women and against immigrant workers, and more. The March 8 demonstration lined a major traffic-clogged street during the evening commute and received non-stop honking, raised fists and delighted applause from car, truck and bus drivers going by.The International Working Women’s Day Coalition held a “Women in Rebellion” march on March 10 in New York City, beginning at Penn Station, home to famed Madison Square Garden. Those marching included delegations from Women Workers for Peace, Honduran Department 19 USA, Ecuadoran Women’s Forum, Stop FBI Repression, Gabriela NYC, Workers World Party and others.The boisterous demonstration went downstairs into Penn Station where travelers waiting for Amtrak, New Jersey Transit and Long Island Railroad trains saw and heard them. Many passengers raised their fists or clapped in solidarity. The marchers stopped in front of restaurants like KFC and Dunkin Donuts to pass out flyers while chanting “Justice for fast food workers!”Along the protest route, two male construction workers, one Black and one white, stopped jackhammering when they saw the “No War on Women” lead banner, giving their strong approval with the thumbs-up sign.After the demonstration, an indoor roundtable discussion was led by representatives from some of the groups who had marched. They spoke about their struggles and why it is important to build a united front against patriarchy, capitalism, racism and imperialism. Male supporters fixed a delicious lunch for the gathering.Contributing to this roundup were Sharon Black, Ellie Dorritie, Kris Balderas Hamel and Monica Moorehead.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Fight Mold

first_imgHurricane Irma had slowed down to a tropical storm by the time she reached Georgia, reducing the amount of expected structural damage to homes. Flood waters still may have left behind a sneaky and dangerous after-effect: mold.“Heavy rains can produce an explosion of mold. Molds produce spores that spread through the air and form new mold growths or colonies when the conditions are right,” said University of Georgia Cooperative Extension expert Pamela Turner. “Mold is all around us. It can grow on any organic material, as long as there are moisture and oxygen. Molds are types of fungi and all fungi need moisture to live.”The key to controlling mold and mold spores is to control the moisture and do it quickly, according to Turner, a housing and environment specialist with the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences. New mold colonies can form in as little as two to three days.Mold can cause fungal allergy and respiratory infections or worsen certain illnesses like asthma, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.“Clean any damp or wet materials and furnishings within 24 to 48 hours of the water damage,” Turner said. “Porous materials like carpet, wood and ceiling tiles may need to be discarded. Non-porous materials made from metal, solid wood or plastic can be cleaned with detergent and water and then dried completely.”To treat mold, Turner recommends following these steps from UGA Extension:Wear protective gear during clean up. Reduce skin exposure by wearing gloves, long sleeves, long pants and sturdy shoes. Protect eyes by wearing goggles. To avoid breathing spores or fragments, wear a respirator rated N95 or higher.Isolate work areas and ventilate these areas to the outdoors. Cleaning disturbs mold colonies, which can release spores into the air. Seal off the areas being cleaned. Open windows, but do not run the air conditioner during cleanup.Remove and discard moldy materials. Throw out porous or contaminated materials like carpeting, carpet padding, mattresses and paper products. Cut away, dispose of and replace wet wallboard and insulation. Wash textile products. To reduce the release of mold spores, cover moldy material with plastic sheeting before removing them from your house.Clean all surfaces with a damp sponge or cloth and a mild detergent. You do not need to use bleach or a disinfectant.Flush the air. After cleaning and disinfecting, air out the space using fans in windows.Dry the area as quickly as possible. Once the area has been cleaned and the air flushed, close the windows and use air conditioning, fans and a dehumidifier to speed the drying process.Remain on mold alert. Continue looking for signs of moisture or new mold growth.“Most small areas of mold – those less than 10 square feet – can be cleaned without hiring a professional, but care should be taken to reduce health risks,” Turner said. “UGA Extension does not provide or recommend mold testing. There are some professional labs that offer this service. Testing will give you the name of the mold, but your time and money are better spent fixing the problem.”To prevent mold from growing in your house in the future, UGA Extension experts suggest following these steps to reduce moisture levels in your house.Turn on the exhaust fan in the bathroom when you take a shower and leave it on for about 5 minutes after you shower.Turn on the kitchen exhaust fan when you are cooking.Check and repair any leaky kitchen and bathroom faucets as well as other plumbing.Remove at least one-third of the contents of your closets to provide increased airflow and reduce the risk of mold. Install a louvered door on closets or keep closet doors open.Purchase a humidistat to monitor the relative humidity inside your house. (In areas with high humidity, like Georgia, keep the indoor level below 60 percent.)Vent your clothes dryer to the outside.Make sure water does not pool around the foundation of your house.If it does, clean, repair or replace gutters and make sure downspouts direct the water away from the foundation. Also, check the grading of the soil around the foundation of your house. It should have a gradual slope away from the foundation.For more information, visit the UGA Extension website at fcs.uga.edu/extension/mold-safety.last_img read more

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Long road to full economic recovery as Jakarta PSBB returns

first_imgThe capital city contributed the most to the national economy compared to other regions in the country as Jakarta’s regional domestic product accounted for 17.17 percent of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) in the second quarter, Jakarta Statistics Indonesia (BPS) data shows. It was followed by East Java (14.6 percent) and West Java (13.45 percent), both also virus epicenters.The government will ramp up spending to increase the capacity of hospital beds and make vaccines available in the first quarter next year, Airlangga said.“Around 30 million vaccine [doses] will be available by the first quarter next year at the earliest, and the rest will follow in the second and third quarters,” he said, adding that the pandemic response and economic recovery efforts in 2021 would be supported by efforts to vaccinate people.The government will expand some social protection programs into next year, including cash aid for formal workers for the first three months next year and cash transfers for micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) during 2021’s first half, Airlangga went on to say.The government still expects GDP to grow by 4.5 percent to 5.5 percent next year as the economy is likely to contract this year. It projects the economy to shrink by 1.1 percent at worst or grow by 0.2 percent at best this year.“The economy is more likely to contract than grow in the third quarter this year, even without other movement restrictions,” Bank Central Asia (BCA) economist David Sumual told the Jakarta Post on Thursday. “The economy has been losing steam since August as virus cases jump.”Indonesia’s economy shrank 5.32 percent in the second quarter as household spending and investment contracted.Although the country’s healthcare facilities are better now compared to during March and April, further restrictions by Jakarta administration will still take a heavy toll on economic activity, he went on to say.“The severity of economic contraction would depend on how long it would take to restrict people’s activities.”Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Kadin) deputy chairwoman Shinta Kamdani called on the government to pay more attention to small businesses and large corporations.“Although domestic demand has picked up gradually, the PSBB policy will heavily affect employment as businesses in transportation and [food and beverages], among other sectors, will be forced to furlough their employees again,” she told the Post.Shinta added that ensuring activity in sectors that were allowed to operate during the PSBB policy would be key to prevent further job losses, and the government should ensure the continuity of export-oriented manufacturing industry operations as global demand for Indonesian goods had risen gradually.“We are trying to keep the manufacturing industry operating amid rising global demand, and we want to ensure that their activities are not being affected by PSBB measures.”The association, Shinta added, would seek permission from the Industry Ministry and regional administrations, including Jakarta, to continue operations for companies that implemented strict health protocols.Topics : Indonesia expects a long road to full economic recovery after Jakarta brought back strict social restrictions measures amid a continued rise in the number of coronavirus cases.A full economic recovery would take at least two to three years, Coordinating Economic Minister Airlangga Hartarto said on Thursday following the Jakarta administration’s decision to reimpose large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) relaxed in early June.“If virus cases rise, then the economy will take a hit. The government expects that it will take until 2022 or even 2023 [for the economy] to return to pre-COVID-19 levels,” he told a virtual business forum held by Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Kadin). “The economy is not only about the fundamental factors but also the sentimental factor, particularly in the capital market,” he went on to say, adding that “pulling the emergency brakes would need to be done by maintaining public confidence in the economy”.His statement comes as the capital is set to require non-essential industries to have their employees work from home, to limit the use of public transportation and to prohibit dining in restaurants starting on Monday, similar to measures imposed from April to June, Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan said in a press briefing late on Wednesday.Indonesian stocks fell by more than 5 percent at closing after hitting the circuit breaker on Thursday morning, following the announcement. The decline in the benchmark Jakarta Composite Index (JCI) stood in contrast with gains seen in most markets across Asia. The rupiah, meanwhile, weakened 0.38 percent against the United States dollar to 14,855.Jakarta has recorded a daily average of over 1,000 new cases this month and registered nearly 43,400 infections and 1,330 deaths from COVID-19 since the pandemic began, according to government data, as the city gradually relaxes its restrictions. Indonesia has recorded more than 203,000 cases as of Thursday with 8,336 fatalities.last_img read more

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