Trail Mix | Lowland Hum

first_imgEarly last week I was listening to Thin, the newest release from Charlottesville folk duo Lowland Hum, and thinking about this blog post, when I reached out to a good friend to see if he had heard them before.Turns out he had and, in fact, had crossed paths with Daniel and Lauren Goans, the married couple who make up Lowland Hum, not long ago.“I spent most of the day hanging with them at a festival last year,” he said, “and they were a very interesting couple, in many ways breathtaking. They are dedicated to making music their own way, without worry about levels of success other than where they currently are.”Having never met Daniel and Lauren myself, I did feel a sense of recognition and agreement with those words. The collection of songs that became Thin is, at bare minimum, interesting, if not purely captivating and hypnotic, so it stood to reason that the musicians behind them be interesting people as well.My notions were confirmed as I dug deeper, learning that Daniel and Lauren partner to create a holistic musical experience, from the songs themselves to album artwork, live videos, and even lyric books that are shared with audience members.I recently caught up with Lauren to chat about the new record, working with one’s spouse, and this weekend’s record release show at The Southern.BRO – Are there any distinct challenges being creative partners with your spouse?LG – Certainly! I think we tried really hard to separate our work life from our home life in the beginning of our collaboration together, but it didn’t take long to realize how unrealistic that is. Of course, whatever is going on in our personal live affects our working relationship. It means we spend a lot of time working through things to stay on the same page. If we aren’t in unity about something, our work is neither productive nor enjoyable.BRO – Describe your songwriting process. Do you schedule time together or strike when the iron is hot, so to speak, and work when inspiration stirs?LG – We tend to work in cycles. We go through phases throughout the year when we try to make songwriting a part of our daily practice. We have also taken writing retreats when we can squeeze them into our tour schedule. In the months leading up to recording, we devote a significant portion of our days to editing and fine-tuning songs we have been working on throughout the year. And, of course, sometimes ideas surface unexpectedly, and we try to give them room to grow when that happens.BRO – I have never heard of a band providing lyric books to its audiences. What was the inspiration behind that?LG – I am a visual processor, so I have always found that I connect to lyrics more deeply when I can see and hear them. When we first started playing shows together, we wanted to create hospitable experiences of presence for people. The lyric books came out of those early brainstorms about how to do that for our audiences. In 2012, we made the first few generations of lyric books entirely by hand, using our home printer, stamping simple illustrations on each book and binding them using a special hand-sewn method. It took us weeks. Now we pay a great print shop in North Carolina to print and hand bind them. The books still have that magical, handmade charm.BRO – We are featuring “Thin Places” on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song?LG – “Thin Places” was written during a writing retreat on the eastern shore of Maryland at a property overlooking the Chesapeake Bay. It is one that Daniel mostly wrote, and the lyrics recall several instances of experiencing wonder in a sudden and surreal way that resulted in gratitude. The song also references Andrew Wyeth, whose work seems to share a color palette with the landscape of the Chesapeake Bay.BRO – You are set to play The Southern this weekend. Excited to share these tunes with the hometown family?LG – We are thrilled to share these songs with the hometown crowd. The album was recorded about a mile and a half from the venue, so it feels all the more celebratory to have the release show at The Southern.Lowland Hum returns home to Charlottesville on Friday to play The Southern Music Hall and we want to give you the chance to catch the show for free! Take a chance on the trivia question down below and shoot your answer to [email protected] A winner from all correct answers received by noon tomorrow (Thursday, Feb. 16) will receive two passes to the show.Question . . . . Prior to being known as The Southern, what name did this venue go by?Good luck!And be sure to take a listen to “Thin Places,” along with tracks from The Sadies, Otis Taylor, Scott Biram, and more on this month’s Trail Mix.last_img read more

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TOMAS Dubrovnik 2018: Guests in Dubrovnik spend 170 euros a day

first_imgCruise passengers spend an average of 59 euros a day Dubrovnik achieved record results in 2018 – an increase of 8 percent of arrivals was recorded than in the previous year, ie one million and 272 thousand arrivals. There were 5 percent more overnight stays, ie 4 million and 140 thousand, compared to the previous year. Dubrovnik Airport operated a total of nineteen scheduled flights a week between seven international airports. The session emphasized the direct connection between Dubrovnik and the United States of America after a full 28 years. Romana Vlašić pointed out the improvement of the offer in the winter period, but also that in 2019 they expect more open hotel capacities in the Dubrovnik area in that period. TOMAS DUBROVNIK 2018: Dubrovnik guests of private accommodation spend 114 euros, and cruise passengers 59 euros per day Jela Tepšić, Deputy Mayor, reminded that in 2017, citizens’ dissatisfaction was expressed and foreign media reported on Dubrovnik in a negative context. However, he believes that the “Respect the City” project is slowly advancing towards sustainable tourism. New rules of conduct have been set in the city center, which will highlight information for visitors within the Wall that, among other things, they are not allowed to consume food and drink and behave inappropriately near cultural monuments. As part of the fourth session of the Assembly of the Tourist Board of the City of Dubrovnik at the Hilton Imperial Hotel, along with the report for the tourist year 2018, the results of the research “TOMAS Dubrovnik 2018” were presented, reports DuList. Photo: Dubrovnik Tourist Board Guests are generally extremely satisfied, especially with the accommodation, service and quality of food, but there are elements that should change such as the offer of entertainment, sports and shopping opportunities and the crowds and traffic in the city. “In 2019, we expect significantly better occupancy and the pre-season and sub-season. In the first month of this year, we have a 30 percent increase in arrivals and overnight stays of XNUMX percent. We expect to better accommodate stationary guests, but also those from cruise shipsSaid Romana Vlašić, director of the Dubrovnik Tourist Board. The obtained research results will be used for directing and improving promotional activities, strengthening the quality of the offer in certain segments, and designing and placing new marketing activities, point out the Dubrovnik Tourist Board.  City of Dubrovnik / Dubravko Lenert They learn the most about Dubrovnik via the Internet, but newspaper articles also stand out as a source of information. “The average age of stationary guests is 42 years, but hotel guests are still a little older. 66 percent of them are university educated. In 5-star hotels, 77 percent of guests have an income of more than 4 thousand euros”Said Marušić and added:”Stationary guests spend 170 euros a day, more than other destinations in Croatia. Consumption differs in categories, so that, for example, guests in private accommodation spend 114 euros per day. Cruise passengers spend an average of 59 euros a day” Zrinka Marušić from the Institute of Tourism presented the first TOMAS research in the area of ​​Dubrovnik. The survey was conducted on a sample of 1.578 respondents, i.e. hotel guests, private accommodation and cruisers. For the first time, Marušić points out, it was researched which guests come to Dubrovnik. The motivation for the arrival of tourists is no longer only because of passive rest and relaxation, but also because of the culture and getting to know the natural beauties and gastronomy, which is why guests who stay in five-star hotels most often come. Although they stay relatively short (25 percent of them from 1 to 3 nights and 70 percent from 4 to 7 nights), stationed guests are quite active during the visit. The largest percentage of surveyed tourists come to Dubrovnik for the first time, as many as 86 percent, and most often come with a partner, while the United States residents travel the most with their families. Most guests arrived from the UK, followed by tourists from the United States. German tourists accounted for 22 percent of arrivals, but the number of overnight stays decreased. In 2018, 10 percent fewer Croatian citizens visited Dubrovnik. In a month, the entire TOMAS Dubrovnik 2018 survey will be published, which we will also publish on the HrTurizam.hr portal.last_img read more

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