Journalist released

first_img Fixer for foreign reporters held in Aden for past five months Organisation United Nations: press freedom situation “deeply worrying” in Yemen, according to RSF to go further News December 3, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist released Receive email alerts News Help by sharing this information RSF_en News YemenMiddle East – North Africa Yemeni journalist killed, nine wounded in Aden airport explosions YemenMiddle East – North Africa February 26, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders today expressed great concern at the reported imprisonment of Yemeni journalist Aref Mohsen al-Khewani on grounds of supposed “mental illness” and called on the government to immediately explain the situation and report on his state of health.The journalist, who is also in the army, was jailed in the Sanaa central prison in October and has not been charged or tried. Reporters Without Borders said that if he was mentally ill, as the authorities reportedly claim, then his human rights had been even more seriously violated and he should be freed at once.Al-Khewani, a non-commissioned officer, worked on the defence ministry weekly paper 26 September until he was dismissed in 1999. He then wrote for opposition papers. Pay owed to him by 26 September has been frozen, efforts to mediate by the Yemeni journalists’ union have failed and his rights have been frequently violated, according to Yemeni sources. News February 11, 2021 Find out more January 6, 2021 Find out more Journalist Aref Mohsen al-Khewani was released on 3 December fromthe Sanaa central prison, apparently as result of appeals to theauthorities by national and international organisations.——————————————————————— 11.26 – Journalist imprisoned for supposed “mental illness” Follow the news on Yemenlast_img read more

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Virtual Reality: Beyond the Hype and Ready for Business

first_imgIn recent years, augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) technologies have operated with a bit of hype—and C-suite skepticism—about their potential business use in practical applications. Of course, most will concede VR’s use in gaming. And, to “see” state-of-the-art military use of AR, they need look no further than the $400,000 F-35 pilot’s helmet. But, fact is, both are ready to transform the workplace by unleashing new waves of productivity in workers and professionals alike, thanks to powerful underlying technologies.AR and VR: What’s the difference?For people not staying up to date with AR and VR news, the two technologies might seem to mix their capabilities and applications. But to be clear, AR overlays data onto users’ views of their environments, and VR provides a totally immersive, simulated experience.An example of the former would be an AR industrial hard hat with a visor worn by workers on the floor of a petrochemical refinery. The visor’s margins would provide the interface for overlaying visualization of real-time, plant operational data, while the worker’s visual field out into the plant would remain unimpeded.An example of the latter is the VR headset that’s reportedly aboard the International Space Station. It surrounds astronaut users’ visual fields with a totally simulated environment to help train them in new critical procedures. In turn, it uses eye-tracking technology to provide a feedback loop to the software driving the training simulation — and to ground controllers, who can collaborate in the training.Powerful enabling technologies are keyThe secret to liberating AR and VR from the realm of science fiction is a combination of increasingly powerful hardware and software technologies. Developers now have massive processing power for desktop use as well as in portable form factors for field use.Take the new Dell Precision 7720 mobile workstation, for example. As Dell’s first VR-ready mobile model, it features the fastest Intel® Xeon™ processors available. These are supported with up to 64GB of compute RAM and 16GB of graphics RAM, plus fast SSD or HDD storage of up to 4TB.Hardware that’s so powerful yet portable unhitches AR and VR developers from fixed laboratories, so they can create enterprise solutions in the field, where users are. This can accelerate solutions development tremendously by helping to enable rapid prototyping around user activities, while effectively eliminating cycles of field testing.Then there are software advancements. At SXSW 2017 in March, Dell hosted the #Dell Experience VR Panel. One of the panelists was Michael Gold, co-founder and CEO of Holojam. His company provides a drag-and-drop platform for creators of AR and VR content and applications. There’s no need for custom code or expensive motion-capture stages, as was the case until recently.In effect, Holojam’s platform provides tools to expand the potential of AR and VR for use in business. And we can expect that many more companies will lower the entry barriers for AR and VR, just as video editing software on smartphones has enabled feature-length films to be shot without multimillion-dollar budgets.Examples of practical applications are growingOne of the most promising fields for practical applications of AR and VR is training. Most everyone has heard of flight simulators, the multimillion-dollar airline cockpits moved around by robotic arms in response to actions by the pilot trainees inside. AR and VR promise to condense all that into a headset.In addition to VR’s use in the space station, NASA is also using VR on the ground to train astronauts in spacewalking. AR and VR technologies are helping to train technicians in repairing complex infrastructure, too. Likewise, they can help surgeons acquire new techniques without putting patients at risk during the learning process.Speaking of healthcare, one of the panelists on the Dell SXSW 2017 VR panel was Dr. Skip Rizzo. As a psychologist at the University of Southern California, he uses VR to treat people with anxiety, PTSD and other neuropsychiatric disorders. His approach is now employed at Veterans Affairs hospitals, military bases and universities across the U.S.Architecture, construction and product development — or just about any discipline using computer-aided design and computer-aided engineering — can also benefit from AR and VR applications. These applications can immerse project stakeholders inside life-sized 3D simulations of their creations so they can work out design issues and limitations before sinking large amounts of capital into building or manufacturer.*         *          *Many more examples exist of how AR and VR technologies are finding their way into practical applications for business, industry, healthcare, education and other fields. We can expect gains in computing power and density to continue, while independent software developers, such as Holojam, accelerate their drive to bring new tools and applications to market. It finally appears that the hype around AR and VR is over and that both are here—for real.Find out more about how Dell EMC customer Solidray, a VR pioneer, uses Dell Precision Tower 5000 Series and Alienware Gaming Desktops to develop low-cost, head-mounted displays.last_img read more

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UVM Jeffords Center names Bud Meyers director

first_imgThe University of Vermont has named Professor H.W. “Bud” Meyers director of the James M. Jeffords Center, a newly established center at UVM for public policy research. The mission of the center is to conduct rigorous, scientifically-based research and evaluation, education, training, and outreach that will support the public’s efforts to address complex and challenging issues.”This is a very exciting time for the University of Vermont,” said Domenico Grasso, vice president for research. “As one of the nation’s premier small public research universities, the Jeffords Center is a critical component to our future and success, and Bud Meyers, with his experience in public policy research, is an excellent fit.”Meyers came to Vermont in 1971, after receiving his doctorate from the University of Connecticut. During his tenure at UVM, he has taught quantitative methods and statistics, directed several grant programs and served as department chair for the Department of Education. He has also served appointments as visiting scholar to Stanford University, Oulu University in Finland and Oxford University, England. While on leave from the university from 2000-2004, he served as Deputy Commissioner of Education for Vermont where he directed the development of the New England Common Assessment Program. For the past five years, he has been coordinating the policy research program of the Vermont Research Partnership at the University of Vermont.”I am pleased to be named the first director of the Jeffords Center,” said Meyers. “The opportunity to develop a center of this magnitude and diversity is a challenging one, but one to which I look forward. Working with the many colleges and departments at UVM, and at other institutions throughout the country, the interdisciplinary research that will be conducted will inform quality public policy decisions. Senator Jeffords’ legacy of accomplishment in each of the center’s signature areas of emphasis will continue to grow as scholars and policy makers collaborate in this important work. The center will reach out to all those who share the values that define the mission to develop and preserve humanity and our environment.”Drawing on the expertise of students and faculty throughout the university’s schools and colleges as well as partners from national and international institutions, the Jeffords Center is coordinating a diverse, interdisciplinary research agenda. This agenda and associated programs will be designed to inform solutions to our local, state, and national public policy questions in the areas of education, health care, environment, and effective government.                                                                               ###last_img read more

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Luka Modric ruled out for six weeks with knee ligament damage

first_imgLuka Modric’s season may well be over after due to the sprain on his right knee which he suffered in Real’s 3-1 win over Malaga.The 29-year-old picked up the injury in a challenge with Malaga midfielder Recio an hour into Saturday’s game. The Madrid club reported that: “After tests carried out this morning on Luka Modric at the Hospital Sanitas La Moraleja by the club’s medical services, the diagnostic confirms that the player has a sprain on the medial collateral ligament in his right knee.”Although Real Madrid have not confirmed the severity of the injury, AS claim the 29-year-old suffered a ligament strain in his right knee – ruling him out for approximately six weeks.That would mean he would miss Real’s six remaining La Liga fixtures and, barring a potential Champions League final, would not be able to play again until next season.Modric could be joined on the sidelines by team-mate Gareth Bale, who he also played with at Tottenham, after the Welshman picked up a suspected calf injury.Despite their casualties, goals from Sergio Ramos, James Rodriguez and Cristiano Ronaldo gave Real a 3-1 win which kept them just two points behind league-leaders Barcelona. –last_img read more

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