AACER: Bankruptcy Filings Continue Five-Year Downward Trend in January

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / AACER: Bankruptcy Filings Continue Five-Year Downward Trend in January Tagged with: AACER Bankruptcies Bankruptcy Filings Epiq Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago AACER: Bankruptcy Filings Continue Five-Year Downward Trend in January Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Related Articles Subscribe  Print This Post in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Share Save February 9, 2015 1,025 Views About Author: Brian Honeacenter_img Previous: DS News Webcast: Monday 2/9/2015 Next: Clayton Holdings Hires New Business Development Director Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Nationwide bankruptcy filings dropped by more than 13 percent year-over-year in January, continuing a five-year trend, according to AACER bankruptcy data reported by Epiq Systems.The total number of bankruptcies filed in the United States for January was 59,037, marking the fifth January in a row that bankruptcy filings declined year-over-year. January’s filing total represented a 13.5 percent decrease from January 2014, when 68,271 bankruptcies were filed, and a decline of 42.6 percent from their highest total for any January, which was 102,835 reached in January 2010. Filings have declined year-over-year each January since 2011.Click HERE to view the entire reportClick HERE to view a larger version of the graphMonth-over-month in January, the number bankruptcy filings declined by 6.4 percent from the total of 6,090 that was reported for December. However, there were 20 filing days in January compared to 22 in December, meaning that if the filings continued at January’s daily rate of 2,952, January’s total would have surpassed December’s.January’s filing total of slightly more than 59,000 is 22 percent less than 2014’s monthly average of 75,840.The two states with the most overall bankruptcy filings for January were California (6,133) and Florida (4,476). Those two states accounted for 18 percent of all of the nation’s bankruptcy filings for the month. The leading states in bankruptcy filings per capita for January were Tennessee, with 5.25 filings for every 1,000 people, and Alabama, with 4.61 for every thousand. Tennessee and Alabama led the nation in 2014 in bankruptcy filings per capita with 5.28 and 5.24, respectively. The national average for January 2015 was 2.28 filings for every 1,000, a decline from 2014’s overall rate of 2.93.Epiq Systems is a leading global provider of technology-enabled solutions for electronic discovery, bankruptcy and class action administration. Top legal professionals depend on us for deep subject-matter expertise and years of firsthand experience working on many of the largest, most high-profile and complex client engagements. Epiq Systems, Inc. has locations in the United States, Europe and Asia. AACER Bankruptcies Bankruptcy Filings Epiq 2015-02-09 Brian Honea The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agolast_img read more

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Danny Burstein-Led Fiddler on the Roof Will Land Earlier on B’way

first_img Related Shows View Comments Five-time Tony nominee Danny Burstein is returning to Broadway earlier than previously announced! The Fiddler on the Roof revival will now begin previews on November 12, instead of November 17, at the Broadway Theatre. Bartlett Sher will direct the new production of the classic musical, which is still scheduled to officially open on December 17. Further casting will be announced later.Based on the stories of Sholom Aleichem, Fiddler on the Roof takes place in Anatevka, a village in Tsarist Russia during the eve of the revolution. Tevye is a poor milkman who cares for his five daughters. While he and the rest of the elders in the village are deeply routed in tradition, his daughters’ forward thinking clashes with Tevye’s principles and causes a rift in the family. The musical features a book by Joseph Stein and a score by Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick that features the songs “Matchmaker, Matchmaker,” “If I Were A Rich Man” and “Sunrise, Sunset.”The production will feature choreography by Hofesh Shechter, based on original conceptions and choreography by Jerome Robbins, along with scenic design by Michael Yeargan, costume design by Catherine Zuber, lighting design by Donald Holder, sound design by Scott Lehrer and music direction and arrangements by Ted Sperling.The Broadway Theatre recently played host to the short-lived Doctor Zhivago. Danny Burstein Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 31, 2016 Star Files Fiddler on the Rooflast_img read more

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FLYING HIGH: Syracuse beats Boston College on last-minute touchdown, becomes bowl eligible for 3rd time in 4 years

first_imgTerrel Hunt had two minutes and eight seconds to salvage Syracuse’s season.After piecing together what Hunt called his “best game ever played,” Syracuse’s bowl hopes took a sour, sickening twist. Hunt had thrown an interception with 2:49 remaining in the game. The Orange trailed by four and a comeback seemed nearly impossible.It looked as if Syracuse would fall just short of what it’s clawed and scrapped for all season.But SU held Boston College to a field goal, allowing only 41 seconds to tick off the clock.“How many of you guys said it was over on the interception?” Syracuse head coach Scott Shafer said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Our kids didn’t.”It was Hunt’s time to shine. Time to carry his team downfield and into the end zone for the win. Time to silence the critics.Hunt and Syracuse (6-6, 4-4 Atlantic Coast) embarked on a miraculous eight-play, 75-yard drive to stun Boston College (7-5, 4-4) 34-31 in front of 37,406 at the Carrier Dome on Saturday. Josh Parris caught the game winner with six seconds left on a gutsy call by offensive coordinator George McDonald and a pinpoint pass by Hunt. With the victory, the Orange becomes bowl eligible for the third time in four seasons.“To be honest with you,” Syracuse center Macky MacPherson said, “I think that’s one of the top five Syracuse games ever played in the Dome.”When it was all over, SU players and coaches frantically zipped around the field. It was complete pandemonium.Team managers viciously attacked one another in jubilation. Sean Hickey, who sat out most of the second half nursing a high ankle sprain, tried to celebrate while making sure no one stepped on his injured foot. Marquis Spruill was so caught up in the joy of the moment that he couldn’t even remember his initial reaction after the fact.For a while, though, as precious seconds ticked off the clock, it appeared as though there would be no brouhaha in the Carrier Dome.Hunt’s interception seemed to be the inevitable dagger Syracuse couldn’t afford. It seemed as though the two times SU couldn’t convert inside the 15-yard line would come back to haunt Syracuse. It looked like a Ryan Norton-missed field goal might bite SU once again.But then Hunt and the offense put together a pristine drive.“I didn’t even look at the clock,” Hunt said. “That’s the crazy part.”Hunt started the drive with a 15-yard pass to Parris across the middle. Then he found Alvin Cornelius for seven yards and scrambled by himself for eight.After a pass interference call, Hunt fumbled, but MacPherson was there to scoop it up and maintain possession. Three plays later, Hunt found Cornelius on the left sideline, and he caught the ball and smartly stepped out of bounds to stop the clock.Six seconds remained.McDonald said the play had been in the works for six weeks. Syracuse had practiced it “ad nauseam” and the players were itching to see their labor come to fruition. The play was in SU’s back pocket for a long time, McDonald said, and he knew there was no better time to bust it out.“I was like, ‘F*ck it,’” McDonald said. “Excuse me, I was like, ‘Let’s roll with it.’”Last time they tried the play, Parris dropped it, McDonald said. This time, though, the redshirt freshman caught the game-winner. He reached both arms outward, soaking in the moment, and his teammates mobbed him.Hunt’s only option was to throw to Parris, and he lofted the ball into the redshirt freshman’s hands on the left side. Parris finished with seven catches for 47 yards and two touchdowns on the day. Hunt, meanwhile, put together a 29-for-43, 270-yard performance and scored three total touchdowns.At the start of the season, Parris and Cornelius were far from the Orange’s main targets. Hunt wasn’t even the starting quarterback. With injuries to Hickey, Jarrod West and Prince-Tyson Gulley, new faces emerged in crunch time.“This is what college football’s all about. There’s not a waiver wire,” Shafer said. “You can’t pick up the phone and say, ‘Let’s get so-and-so.’ This is college football. You’ve got to step up to the plate and say, ‘Hey, what’s your name again? You’re in.’ Then all of a sudden you know his name when he makes a play.”On Saturday, Parris made plays for Syracuse.But six ticks remained. One squib kick, two completions and a fumble later, though, and Syracuse was going bowling.“Penn State, we had the ball in our hands and we didn’t finish,” McDonald said. “Pittsburgh, we had the ball in our hands and we didn’t finish.“Today we finished.”When it was all over, MacPherson said he was ready to collapse. He’s just thrilled to have a chance to play one more collegiate game. He doesn’t care if the bowl game’s in Alaska; he’s just ready to go play one more time.That’s possible thanks to Syracuse’s remarkable final drive.The unthinkable turned into the unimaginable as a potentially gut-wrenching loss turned into a miraculous, season-saving win.“I feel bad for the people who left,” MacPherson said, “because they missed one hell of a game.” Comments Published on November 30, 2013 at 7:15 pm Contact Trevor: [email protected] | @TrevorHass Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Syracuse football preseason storylines, No. 10: How SU’s tight ends will factor into this year’s offense

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ With Syracuse football training camp less than a month away, The Daily Orange beat writers, Chris Libonati, Jon Mettus and Matt Schneidman, will analyze one of the top 10 preseason storylines, top 10 position battles or reveal one of 10 player files each day. Check out dailyorange.com and follow along here to countdown to camp.Former Syracuse offensive coordinator Tim Lester used his tight ends in traditional roles, but with new head coach Dino Babers gearing up for his first season, outlook at the position has become a little trickier.Babers used his primary tight end Derek Lee as a tight end, fullback and wide receiver combination at Bowling Green last season. Redshirt senior Josh Parris stands out on Syracuse’s roster as the most athletic tight end who could provide that sort of flexibility. But SU’s No. 1 option at tight end over the last two years was limited with an injury during the spring and fell down to the third spot on the post-spring game depth chart.Senior Cameron MacPherson is positioned as the starter right now ahead of senior Kendall Moore, who has bounced around between offensive line and tight end during his career at SU. MacPherson thrived as a blocker last year, which could be important if the offensive line struggles and Babers resorts to keeping an extra body in to help block.Based on the spring game, it seems tight ends will contribute most to the passing game in the red zone or in other short yardage situations. MacPherson had a touchdown catch and Moore hauled in one with one hand in the red zone during the scrimmage.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAll five tight ends on the roster are upperclassmen and there are no transfers or freshmen coming in to try to shoot up the depth chart. Back in October, Chris Clark, a former five star recruit and the No. 1 tight end coming out of high school in 2015, verbally committed to Syracuse after deciding to leave UCLA where he played one game in 2015. But 11 days later, SU pulled its offer and then-head coach Scott Shafer told Clark that it “wasn’t the best fit,” Clark said. He then decided to go to Pittsburgh and it is unclear whether he’ll be able to play for the Panthers in 2016 or have to sit out a year.Which tight end sees the most time will likely come down to flexibility, assuming the multiple roles Babers could require of him and athletic ability to fit into the no-huddle offense. Comments Published on July 14, 2016 at 10:35 am Contact Jon: [email protected] | @jmettuslast_img read more

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Football: T.J. Watt uses new defensive identity to emerge from older brothers’ shadows

first_imgAt this point in his life, T.J. Watt has learned enough to know that when the cameras are pointed at him and reporters wave their recorders in his face, there will be questions about his brother, J.J. Watt.This is just an average media session when you share a last name with the most dominant defensive player the National Football League over the last three seasons or so.It’s a good storyline. The brother of an NFL star and University of Wisconsin football product is on campus. The comparisons are natural, too. But instead of answering the questions he’s heard dozens of times like, “How often do you talk to your brother?” or “Does he give you tips?”, T.J. Watt would rather do his own talking on the field.“Obviously it’s on my mind, but I don’t go out of my way thinking about creating my own legacy and I also don’t think about trying to go in their exact footsteps,” T.J. Watt said during training camp. “I just try to let my play go and do my talking.”T.J. Watt’s answer is indicative of his diplomatic nature. He’s like his brothers that way. Their answers never insult anyone and usually employ a cliché along the lines of hard work and “taking it one day at a time.”Like T.J. Watt said, he’d rather let his actions on the gridiron tell his story, because his story is his own. T.J. Watt’s journey truly began about 14 months ago in the Camp Randall Stadium bleachers during local media day. There was a swarm of media surrounding Derek Watt, about to enter his final year as a Badger. Nobody wanted to talk to T.J. Watt.“I was just thinking about last year this time looking over at these chairs,” T.J. Watt said at the local media day Aug. 7  “Derek was the one getting the interviews … And I was sitting over there not getting a single interview because I just switched to defense and no one really knew about me.”A month earlier, UW head coach Paul Chryst approached T.J. Watt in the back of a team meeting armed with the suggestion that he switch to defense. T.J. Watt laughed at first, but Chryst was serious. The youngest Watt talked to his family, including J.J. Watt, who was supportive and said he had the skill set to excel on the opposite side of the ball if that was what he wanted. The youngest Watt watched YouTube videos of prolific pass-rushers in the game: Von Miller and, you guessed it, J.J. Watt.The next day, T.J. Watt was no longer a tight end for the Wisconsin Badgers, but an outside linebacker. The 6-foot-5, 236-pound T.J. Watt said he enjoys the defensive side of the ball because rather than waiting to get your number called on offense, a defensive player can make an impact on any given play.Bumbaca: Time to rise to challenge for Badgers, or elseThe television in the Camp Randall Stadium press box flashed a bottom-line flicker that read: “No. 9 Wisconsin avoids upset Read…“I love getting after the ball, getting after the passer, just making plays,” he said. “I like [that] as a defender, you don’t have to be blitzing to make a tackle or make a pass breakup.”Though T.J. Watt appeared in all of UW’s 13 games, 2015 was a transitional year for him. He made eight tackles. But his fellow outside linebacker Vince Biegel saw promise in him right away.“He’s got some good players in his family, I guess,” Biegel, a fifth-year senior, joked.But seriously.“He’s a hard worker,” Biegel said. “He comes into work every single day and pushes our whole outside linebacker group and that’s what it’s all about.”Biegel added that having two guys on the edge who can rush the passer is a luxury. They rely on each other, and because both excel at getting after the quarterback, opposing offenses usually cannot afford to chip-block or double-team both of them at the same time, yielding one-on-one opportunities.T.J. Watt has reaped the benefits of those chances in 2016. Through four games, he ranks second on the team in total tackles (29) and leads the team in sacks (5.5), tackles-for-loss (7.5) and quarterback hits (five).To this day, Chryst believes T.J. Watt could have been a solid tight end, but said his dedication allowed him to find a home on defense.“It’s not that he picked it up faster or slower than I thought,” Chryst said. “T.J.’s a really good football player. He’s an unbelievable worker and he’s smart. I think he loves the game and so how do you put a timetable on that development? I appreciate it. It’s been fun to see him grow and develop and last year have success then build off of that.”The Watt brothers remain close primarily through a group chat, T.J. Watt said, talking nearly every day. Less than 10 percent of the time it’s about football, he said, but he won’t hesitate to send J.J. Watt a video of his pass rushes and have him critique.After a dominant performance (six tackles, 2.5 sacks, 3.5 tackles-for-loss and a quarterback hit) during UW’s 30-6 win over Michigan State Sept. 24, a score of reporters surrounded T.J. Watt the moment he stepped into the visitors media room in the annals of Spartan Stadium. It was the polar opposite of Media Day 2015.No one asked him about his brothers that day. He let his play do the talking.last_img read more

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