Almost 1 in 5 larger charities cutting fundraising jobs due to Covid

first_img  537 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3 Melanie May | 28 September 2020 | News “While some parts of the economy are on the up after a tough first half of the year, charities have yet to see the light at the end of the tunnel. The updated jobs support package set out by the Chancellor will likely provide some relief for the sector, but against a backdrop of an economic recession, and the looming tightening of lockdown, for many organisations it will do little to square the circle of rising demand for help and shrinking capacity – with very serious consequences for all of us.”Caron Bradshaw, Chief Executive of Charity Finance Group, said:“The findings of our latest survey are not surprising but are deeply troubling. Social change organisations play an enormous role in our communities, providing crucial services to millions of people every day, nationwide. A significant number now face an increasingly uncertain future. Our capacity to deliver for both the short and long term is shrinking fast at a time it is never more needed.“We are calling on government to take action now to address the fragility of the organisations working at the heart of our communities; working on the frontline, helping to mitigate the worst effects of the Covid-19 crisis. We must ensure that charities and social enterprise are supported to meet the public need and sustain healthy communities.”The September 2020 PBE Covid Charity Tracker was conducted in partnership with the Chartered Institute of Fundraising and the Charity Finance Group between 15 and 20 September. 224 charities responded to the survey.Peter Lewis, Chief Executive of the Chartered Institute of Fundraising, commented:“This research further confirms the significant scaling back of charitable services and activities just when people across the UK need them most. Fundraised income continues to be hit despite the valiant efforts of our members and the fundraising community around the UK, and tragically many fundraisers are facing redundancy as their organisations are forced to make incredibly difficult decisions. Politicians and policy makers need to act now to safeguard vital charity-delivered services and activities around the UK.” Almost half (47%) of UK charities are expecting a difficult winter with increased demand for their services. However, the same proportion have had to reduce activity, with 1 in 4 so far also cutting jobs as a result of Covid-19, according to a survey.The latest Covid Charity Tracker by Pro Bono Economics shows that service delivery and fundraising are the areas seeing the most job cuts. Overall, 32% have either made or are making job cuts to their service delivery functions, and 15% to fundraising – rising to around 1 in 5 medium-large charities.Covid challengeOverall, 94% say that Covid-19 has posed a financial challenge, with drops in earned income, public donations, and money associated with fundraising activity like lotteries and auctions especially problematic. More than half of the survey respondents say public donations have fallen, with one-in-five reporting a drop in such income of more than 25%. Funding from public sector contracts, trusts and foundations however has broadly held up to date.Charity responseIn response to the financial challenges faced, 48% say they have significantly reduced activity, with the majority seeking additional support. 68% said they had applied for financial help from government (including furloughing staff) with 72% seeking other additional sources of funding.The survey, conducted ahead of the government’s announcement on a new wage subsidy scheme, found that more than one-in-four charities (29%) had already made redundancies, with one-in-five expecting to make cuts once the government’s Job Retention Scheme is withdrawn at the end of October. This was more common among larger charities at a quarter of medium-large charities compared to just 6% of small charities.Just over a quarter (27%) have also renegotiated rent, sold property or reduced office space.Overall, almost half (47%) of UK charities have also revised down their financial forecasts over the last two months in anticipation of a tough winter ahead. Among small charities, this rises to 58%, and sits at 42% for medium and large organisations.Only 8% of small charities and 5% of medium-large charities said they had not faced any financial challenges as a result of Covid-19.Matt Whittaker, CEO of Pro Bono Economics, said: Advertisement  536 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3 Tagged with: COVID-19 Research / statistics About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Almost 1 in 5 larger charities cutting fundraising jobs due to Covidlast_img read more

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Comedy of Manners: God of Carnage Debuts at Northport’s Engeman Theater

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The internationally acclaimed God of Carnage is possibly the most unique theatrical offering that I have seen at Northport’s John W. Engeman Theater. The dark farcical comedy makes for uproarious pandemonium and laughter, and the audience (myself included) simply loved it. It is so good that you might want to see it more than once.French playwright Yasmina Reza hones in on one of the universal fears of parenthood—that your child will be hurt by, or might hurt, another child. The play, originally written in Reza’s native tongue and translated into English by Christopher Hampton, has captured the imagination of theatergoers around the world.After its debut performance in 2006, God of Carnage made its way to London where it received the Olivier Award for Best New Play of the Year. Its 2009 stint on Broadway boasting a stellar cast, including James Gandolfini, garnered three Tony Awards. Since then, it has graced stages in Spain, Ireland, Serbia and Croatia, to name a few.The play is set in the Cobble Hill section of Brooklyn. After another boy breaks two of their 11-year-old son’s teeth during a playground brawl, Veronica and Michael go where angels fear by inviting the parents of aggressor to their home to discuss the incident. Although we never meet the boys, Henry and Benjamin, whose antics ignite the fuse, it is the parents who entertain us with their unexpected emotional explosions.This unlikely rendezvous is the brainchild of Veronica, an art aficionado with a forthcoming book on the Darfur. Her husband, Michael, is a wholesale distributor of household goods. The other set of parents are Alan, a well-to-do lawyer with international clientele and Annette, who simply says that she is into wealth management.It all starts out with polite, amicable conversation in Veronica and Michael’s posh living room. In the name of peaceful coexistence, mouthwatering clafouti, a fruity French dessert, is served and expensive yellow tulips adorn vases.Yet these niceties cannot mask the fact that the couples are understandably very wary of each other and looking for holes in each others’ polished façades. The best laid plans go horribly astray as the meeting progresses and at a delightfully dizzying pace.It seems that no clafouti, no matter how delicious, can pacify the god of carnage, whom Alan explains has reigned supreme since the dawn of time and unleashes our basest and most primitive instincts.Alan turns out to be right. In short order, the thin veil of civility is pierced, and the couples are at each other’s throats. Reza’s script is replete with clever, hilarious surprises and shifting marital allegiances that animate the set, especially after a bottle of primo rum is uncorked. Kudos to Richard Dolce for his impeccable directing of this talented cast whose performances requires split second comedic timing. This is ensemble work at its best.Which is the funniest scenario? I’ll hint at them. Who had done a hamster wrong? What happens after Annette—understandably a bundle of nerves—upchucks on a collection of  Veronica’s treasured coffee table books displayed like window dressing in the living room? How do the characters change after imbibing that primo rum?Nancy Lemenager is ideal as the highbrow art lover who has unrealistic expectations about human nature and does not recognize a highly combustible situation when she sees one. Mickey Solis is hilarious as Michael, Veronica’s polar opposite, a man who proudly announces that he is “not a member of polite society,” but rather a Neanderthal.Alan (Chris Kipiniak) skillfully fits the bill as the prototypical lawyer who is welded to his cell phone and more concerned with advising a pharmaceutical company on their defense against charges of a dangerous drug than dealing with his son’s conduct. His wife, Annette (Alet Taylor), who first appears to be the most restrained of the foursome, is emboldened and comes out fighting after some of that rum enters her system. It made for some very funny and feel-good moments.Stephen Dobay’s set—decorated with the minimalist flair—makes it the perfect venue for maximal action. Showcased is a large-scale wooden sculpture created from found objects à la Louise Nevelson, one of the most influential and distinguished sculptors of the 20th century. Painted a monochromatic dark gray, the disparate pieces that compose the sculpture become unified textural content. Splashes of red, white and black further enliven the room’s décor.It is pure eye candy. Bravo, Mr. Dobay!God of Carnage runs through March 6. Tickets can be purchased at the theater’s box office, 250 Main St, Northport, by calling 261-2900 or by visiting engemantheater.com.  Photo credit from left to right: The performances of Nancy Lemenager, Mickey Solis, Alet Taylor, and  Chris Kipiniak make for uproarious pandemonium in the Engeman Theater’s production of God of Carnage (Photo by Michael DeCristofaro).last_img read more

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Jalissa Trotter produces career day in Syracuse volleyball’s loss to Duke

first_img Published on October 30, 2016 at 8:06 pm Contact Kaci: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+ Duke’s Sasha Karelov’s powered the ball into Syracuse territory. After a dig, it touched the fingertips of Kendra Lukacs, who set the ball to Jalissa Trotter. She then nailed it into the floor on Duke’s side of the net. SU fans screamed in unison as Syracuse won the second set, 25-23, after struggling in the first, losing 25-15.“I wanted it and I knew my team wanted it,” Trotter said. “I did my job.”The Orange (6-16, 5-7 Atlantic Coastal) struggled in the first set of a 3-1 loss to Duke (16-6, 10-2 Atlantic Coastal) on Sunday in the Women’s Building, but managed to keep the next three sets close partly because of Trotter’s strong effort.The sophomore came in first or second in four different statistical categories. Her .304 hitting percentage was second to Santita Ebangwese’s .412 percentage and her 18 assists fell behind only Annie Bozzo’s 23. Trotter tallied four blocks and only Levert had more (five). Trotter posted career highs in digs (16), points (10.5) and kills (eight).Six of Trotter’s assists, four of her kills and three of her blocks came in the second set, the only set the Orange won. Midway through that set, with the score at 9-9, Duke’s Anna Kropf hit the ball into Trotter and Ebangwese. The pair blocked it, giving SU its first lead of the game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I just try to stay aggressive regardless of which position I’m playing,” Trotter said.Syracuse held the lead only six more times throughout the rest of the game. In the third set, Duke started with five unanswered points. A bad set by Cindy Marina gave the Orange its first point, but another Duke kill put the Blue Devils up 6-1.Then Trotter added three of the next four points. She scored the first of off a set by Bozzo. One point later, Trotter blocked Jamie Stivers. As the ball hit the ground, Trotter turned toward the rest of her teammates on the court, arms extended at her sides, screaming “yeah.” Another SU point later, Bozzo set up Trotter. Once again, the latter slammed the ball to Duke’s side of the court, bringing the score to 6-5, Duke.The set stayed close until the Blue Devils went on a 7-0 run to all but seal it.The Blue Devils called a timeout up 23-20 in the fourth and final set. On the ensuing serve, Trotter hit the ball to the other side of the court. Leah Meyer got the kill and put Duke within one point of winning the game, 24-20.Even Trotter’s best efforts weren’t enough. Commentslast_img read more

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