Stray horses raise injury concerns in Limerick’s Carew Park

first_imgRELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsBreaking newsStray horses raise injury concerns in Limerick’s Carew ParkBy Staff Reporter – July 2, 2015 1491 Facebook Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Email Linkedin Advertisement Twitter Horses in Carew Park Southillby Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up PEOPLE in Carew Park fear it is only a matter of time before someone is injured by a stray horse or by sulkies racing up and down the roads of the Limerick city housing estate.A local parent told the Limerick Post this week that elderly people are terrified to leave their homes because of the large number of horses wandering around the estate. He also said that local families are “terrorised” by sulky races on a daily basis and predicted a serious accident if action isn’t taken.“I have young children and I would not let them outside the front door. Someone is going to get killed up here if something isn’t done, it’s that bad,” he said.“We have our problems with corner boys like anywhere else but things have gotten worse in recent months. A horse followed a child down the road the other day and another horse was left tied to the front gate of an old woman’s house.”When he contacted Limerick City and County Council he claims he was told by the local authority that Carew Park was an issue for the Limerick Regeneration agency.“Regeneration said it was the Council I needed to talk to. They are just passing the buck between them. Things are getting out of hand and the Gardai and the Council need to tackle it. I am looking out my window and there’s three horses over on the green right now winking at me.”Fianna Fail TD, Willie O’Dea described the local authority’s management of horses in the city as an “abject failure”.“This is appalling and I have taken the matter up with the Council. Control of horses in the Metropolitan area is exclusively a matter for the the local authority and it is wrong and unfair that people should be fobbed off.“Stray horses do present a terrible problem in Carew Park and elsewhere and the Council’s management of this matter can only be described as an abject failure. I have encountered problems myself with sulkies on the main road and the Minister for Justice should look at banning them from all main roads.”A spokesman for the local authority said they were keen to see the city-wide issue of stray horses resolved.“The matter has been raised through the Regeneration Community Consultative Forum and by elected members. The Council is reviewing the options available to it in relation to resolving this issue”, he explained.center_img Print Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories WhatsApp Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Previous articleSoccer – “We have to go on a run” – Martin RussellNext articleOvergrown hedgerows putting motorists at risk Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGSCarew ParkhorseslimerickLimerick City last_img read more

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Non-Credit Instructor – Industrial Electrical-PLC

first_imgPosting Job TitleNon-Credit Instructor – Industrial Electrical PLCDepartmentContinuing Education and Organizational DevelopmentPosition TypeNon-Credit InstructorNumber of openings1Job SummaryJohnson County Community College is seeking an IndustrialElectrical-PLC Instructor. This part-time position will teachnon-credit students the basics of industrial electricalapplications including PLC systems fundamentals, programming, andtroubleshooting. Training will be delivered through lecture andactual hands-on practice with required equipment. Instructor willbe responsible in development of course syllabi, creating labsexercises, and at times building or assembly of lab equipment forinstruction.Required Qualifications-High School graduate or equivalent-5 years of relevant work experience-Knowledgeable and productive in industrial electricalinstallation/repair, various PLC applications, programming andtroubleshootingPreferred Qualifications-AAS or Bachelor’s degree-Ability to work day, evenings, and/or weekend hours-Ability to efficiently use Microsoft office products, especiallyPowerPoint-Ability to use current Allen Bradley and/or Siemens programmingformats-Experience working in a continuing education trainingenvironmentRequired application documentsPlease submit a resume with the application.Hours per WeekVariesWork Hours/DaysHours and days will vary.Salary Grade LevelNONCRSalaryCompetitive rate of pay.LocationOverland Park Main CampusDisclosuresEvery employee of the college is expected to treat all members ofthe college community with dignity and respect demonstratingprofessional, courteous and respectful behavior and engage inconstructive conflict resolution, when needed.In accordance with the college policy, finalists for this positionwill be subject to criminal background investigations. Individualhiring departments at JCCC may elect to administer pre-employmenttests, which are relevant to essential job functions as part of theapplicant selection/hiring process. Many departments require thoseselected for hire to submit a certified transcript for all degreesobtained. For full consideration, applicants are encouraged toapply prior to the review date listed in posting.Johnson County Community College welcomes the application of anyqualified candidate and does not discriminate on the basis of race,color, age, sex, religion, marital status, national origin,disability, veteran’s status, sexual orientation, gender identity,genetic information or other factors which cannot be lawfullyconsidered, to the extent specified by applicable federal and statelaws.If you are an applicant requesting assistance or a reasonableaccommodation in the application process, please contact the Officeof Human Resources at 913-469-3877, or email [email protected] a summary of all disclosures (Background check, Clery Act, ADA,EOE, etc.) refer to the links on our Career page.Advertised: 30 Mar 2021 Central Daylight TimeApplications close: 31 May 2021 Central Daylight Timelast_img read more

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Sweat the Small Stuff

first_imgCollaboration is the essential ingredient for intelligent “workplace” teams, as studies have told us for decades — yet for many enterprise organizations today, working together easily still remains elusive.I can point to a few reasons historically for this failure, but more hopefully, I see multiple trends that will change our future.Turn Quadrants Upside DownFirst, for the past twenty years or more, the team collaboration topic has often been approached with the classic 1970 Boston Consulting mindset: solve the largest problem for the largest gain. In fact, coming at “working together” from an individual user-based perspective is a better strategy in today’s product-as-a-service world.I would argue that IT apps should eliminate small, frustrating, and painful tasks to create instant user gratification. Doing this repeatedly over time, I believe, earns loyalists who are thrilled to use your collaboration tools and are then highly productive.Take the common collaboration roadblock of trying to share a file. Fixing this alone might dislodge the majority of pain holding back teamwork in your enterprise.In a typical scenario, a team working together wants to share a large PowerPoint file, but IT blocks large file sends through email. Instead, IT could enable shared folders with a smart phone app, then allow easily copy/pasted folder links sent in email. Work teams would gain immediate file access, even while traveling, to keep collaboration going.All it takes is prioritizing the user pain.Focusing on improving one small productivity task increases the likelihood of it getting solved. Choosing to solve the most frustrating or inhibiting user problems generates rampant user engagement – top criteria for enterprise software success in a cloud future.Similarly, using apps that do one thing well can drive productivity through the roof. Sweating the small stuff that holds users back will pay off in team motivation and their day-to-day ability to work together productively.Respect Muscle MemorySecond, old yet productive working habits have been outright forsaken for the new. If colleagues are adept with email and use it fluently, incorporate that habit into the newest services you deliver.Allow teams to continue using email as a sharing mechanism while taking away its inefficiencies. Better yet, give them improvements, such as protection from malicious email attachments.Habits are embedded in muscle memory. The fewer you have to change, the better. How much are your collaboration apps undoing productivity for the sake of productivity?Adapt to Users, Not to InitiativesFinally, rethink what’s causing frustration or creating inefficiencies in your teams in the first place. Does solving the root cause of working together really require a complete technical rearchitecture?Considering that the tenure of corporate leaders continues to drop, fitting collaboration projects into smaller 1-2 year efforts with rapid iteration cycles is critical. Look for creative and innovative solutions that keeps users productive first.My favorite example is that you don’t have to reconfigure SAP and change your invoice processing workflow just to solve getting SOWs signed. We simply incorporated electronic signatures into our file sharing app. If an executive is on the road, no need to print, sign, fax and return a document. Just fingertip sign and click to share, all in one place.Enterprises have enough company-wide initiatives to drive, and coming at collaboration as an entire reconfiguration can lose steam before it ever delights a single user. Adapt your collaboration services to users first, so approved apps are immediately desirable at the grassroots level. And rethink functionality from the user level to uncover potentially simple, shorter-term solutions.Why the Future Looks BrighterOf course, hindsight is 20/20, and there have been valiant attempts to make collaboration better. Recent studies are looking at how to design the smartest teams possible in the first place so they’re predestined to collaborate, for example.But from a technology perspective, I see several trends that were not pervasive decades ago. These have changed behaviors and laid the groundwork for us to come at collaboration differently. This is why I’m hopeful things will change for the better.For IT, for example, the ease of delivering incremental software changes to users has greatly improved. Users know how to self-procure apps. They are on the lookout for, and willing to try, better ways of working. IT can take advantage of this new mindset by delivering the best user-loved solutions. IT can lead impactful changes that address strategic organizational needs, like productivity and global collaboration.Vendors have changed as well, amidst the popularity of smart devices. The constraints of small screen sizes have forced the quality of software to improve. Only the most essential functions can be presented to today’s users, who are constantly swiping and mobile. This mobile design discipline has made it a requirement to do less things very well, rather than delivering distracting or unused feature sets that might slow users down.These future trends and an understanding of past failures can help us, as leaders, navigate to gain incredible team efficiencies in the present. Start by solving the painful annoyances that hold teamwork back; carry forward learned productivity habits that work; and focus on users, not initiatives.last_img read more

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Creative Inspiration: The Power of Thinking Differently

first_imgBe inspired by these creatives!  Boost your own creativity and productivity by thinking differently.The point of this post is hopefully to inspire you to not only think differently, but act differently and in acting differently create better work. I’ve pulled together a few of my most recent inspiring finds (in the hope that they’ll inspire you as much as they have me) to think, act and do differently…more creatively and more productively. The original inspiration for this post came from a story I read about the design simplicity for a juice box in Japan:Design Thinking“Rule of thumb: if you think something is clever and sophisticated beware-it is probably self-indulgence.” – Donald A Norman.The first point of inspiration is that of simplicity. In good design, the form and the function are rolled into one seamless, attractive entity. There are no extraneous parts, flourishes or bit and bobs. This banana juice box just looks like a banana-juice-box. It’s pretty perfect. Any extra writing or labels or information would kill the striking simplicity of the design. Its not confusing in anyway.Good design lets the user get straight to using the your product, service or software without reading the manual or asking for help. Apple are famous for their good design and for very good reason:In The Design of Everyday Things by Donald A Norman (which is one of 5 books for creatives that everyone should read) he points out that by simplifying design we can clearly communicate to the user what they need to do to use a product.As a film editor this call for simplicity makes me think that I can add all the flashy graphics, cool looking color grade and sound effects I want, but if the story in its simplest form doesn’t work, the rest doesn’t matter. Less is still more. What would it look like to strip what you create, down to its simplest form?Re-Thinking ThinkingI was reading recently about the process of adapting to living in New York that a post production guy was going through, after moving to the US office of one of my favorite London production companies. Having to downsize dramatically not only required thinking simply but also creatively. For a flavor of what I mean, check out this intensely creative use of 420 square feet of New York real-estate:So often I find myself thinking that I need more stuff – tools, plugins, gadgets and gizmos to get more work done. But really I just need to make the most of what I already have with some thoughtful, creative re-thinking. By re-thinking I mean forcing myself to look at what I do in a whole new light. How can I make small tweaks to what I do day to day that would make me much more productive and creative?Templates and presets spring to mind as my video editing equivalent of fold-away furniture. Sure it might only take me a few minutes a couple of times a day to throw something through a compression program to make a client’s email-sized video file. But that’s still exporting the master file, opening Compressor, setting the parameters, hitting submit, opening the batch monitor and waiting for the file, finding the file and copying it to the Dropbox folder (or uploading via WeTransfer), copying the public link and pasting that into an email.So I’ve made myself an automator solution that does it all for me.  All I have to hit is ‘export’ and walk away. Sometime later I’ll get an email that I can then easily forward to my client. If building that kind of thing sounds too complex then a simple droplet on your desktop could do away with half of your work in one move.Taking the time to re-think what you do is the most valuable time you can spend. Find the things you do regularly and see if you can think of a better way of doing them, streamlining your processes. It could be incredibly simple things like mapping new keyboard shortcuts in your creative program of choice or building a template invoice for each client or whatever your equivalent is. Taking the time to re-think will most always be worth it.Outward ThinkingRon Finley is an incredibly inspiring gardener whose art is to take over public spaces and make them fruitful again:Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA — in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, defiance, beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where “the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys.”I find Ron’s story to be both an inspiration and a provocation. An inspiration to dust off my window boxes and try to persuade them to once again sustain fruitful and useful life – herbs for the scent and the flavor – and a provocation to be creative in ways that are outside of my ‘normal’ creative field.Creativity is a habit that grows through being fed, nurtured and worked. Finding creative sources that inspire and provoke you, but originate from outside of your usual sphere will bring in fresh insights (in a cross pollinating way – to really stretch the gardening metaphor) and fresh challenges to your creative work. Open up your thinking to what’s happening outside.last_img read more

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What the Marvel Cinematic Universe Means for the Future of Film

first_imgWhat the Marvel Cinematic Universe blockbusters mean for filmmakers and the ongoing development of the industry.In a great think piece on the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), film critic Matt Zoller Seitz argues that Avengers: Endgame “represents the decisive defeat of ‘content’ by ‘cinema.’” While that may be true as far as film consumers are concerned, it raises a much different question for filmmakers: How will we adjust in this bold new future of “content”?It took me several years of going out of my way to ignore the MCU films before I finally succumbed and dove into Avengers: Infinity War. I had sworn off superhero movies (of any make) after Spiderman 3. So, I was pleasantly surprised to see that the genre had at least figured out how to not make me want to vomit in the theater.But, in retroactively viewing the rest of the 22-movie MCU cannon, I felt my resolve melt away into a pleasant, numb warmness built on spectacle, familiar emotional cues, and a few well-placed comedic quips. However, while the consumer in me found peace, the filmmaker in me was a bit worried.While there have always been big-budget blockbusters, what do these 22 mega-blockbusters mean for the industry? Are they pulling the medium to greater heights? Or are they pushing out everyone else in their wake? And, asking as a nobody indie filmmaker, What does that mean for the rest of us?Note: This article is on what the MCU movies mean for the industry moving forward. For more information on the cameras, lenses, and filmmaking techniques of the MCU movies, check out these articles:The Cameras and Lenses Behind the Marvel Cinematic UniverseThe Cameras and Lenses Behind the Marvel Cinematic Universe — Phase TwoThe Cameras and Lenses Behind the Marvel Cinematic Universe — Phase Three Film as a Cultural EventThe biggest shift in the industry, as Zoller Seitz is quick to point out, is that these mega-blockbuster film premieres have become less about — you know — a film premiering, and much more of a cultural event. Where were you when “the snap” happened?While this is good for drumming up buzz on social media (and press about said buzz), it also quickly dilutes the value of the actual film in question. This was the problem in the early 2000s superhero movies, when many of the films suffered with less focus on scripts and filmmaking, in favor of marketing and merchandising.And, while the studios have more recently been putting further resources back into focusing on strong scripts, better performances, and highly capable filmmakers, it continues to create an environment where the quality of the product is less valuable than the event itself.A Full Calendar of ProductionsThe first movie in the MCU “Infinity Saga” was Iron Man in 2008. And, while “Phase One” consists of six movies over six years, “Phase Two” features six movies released over a span of two years, and “Phase Three” ramps production up to ten movies over three years time.At this rate, it’d probably be safe to assume that Marvel alone will at least continue to produce and release two or three movies a year, for the foreseeable future. This creates a fully packed, yearly, around the clock calendar of Blockbuster movie production.Will this fatigue audiences? Maybe. Will it fatigue producers, filmmakers ,and production houses? Probably. But, all of those can be replaced. With so many films in production at any given time, studios like Marvel will most probably need a fresh stream of talent, crews, and post houses — ready to work long hours — to keep the production machine churning.Special Effects and Spectacle BurnoutWhich brings us to the spectacle and special effects of these MCU movies. It’s been well documented that to bring beautiful effects and spectacle to the screen, in many of your favorite movies and animated features, there are teams of overworked (and often underpaid) artists. Many of these artists are no more than contract workers with post houses, working project by project, which creates an ecosystem rife with long hours, quick hires, and quicker layoffs.And, while the industry has, perhaps, improved in the last few years, the need for special effects work continues to grow. Hopefully, for those who are interested in careers in post-production filmmaking, this need will eventually weigh out in favor of companies who value work-life balance and fair compensation.The Death of the Mid-Budget FeatureAnother known exploit of this new super blockbuster culture has been the death of the middle-budget feature film. According to Matthew Weiner (creator of Mad Men), “Something happened that nobody can make a movie between $500,000 and $80 million.”If you’re an indie filmmaker looking to follow up your DIY breakout feature, you may find that your options are still pretty limited, in terms of securing funding for anything bigger. Unless you’re a filmmaker with name recognition grandfathered in to a time when the $30 million dollar blockbuster existed, many modern indie filmmakers are finding themselves perpetually stuck in the same low-budget space.A New Path EmergesHowever, if there is any silver lining to the MCU, as well as the future for up-and-coming indie filmmakers, it’s the recent success of indie-filmmakers-turned-MCU-helming directors, including Taika Waititi, Ryan Coogler, the Russo Brothers, and DC director Patty Jenkins.All of these filmmakers blazed what is becoming a new path from low-budget indie success to directing $100-million-plus blockbusters. Yet, for every success story like the Russo brothers, there are still countless others who don’t get the opportunities of these Avengers behemoths.This ultimately creates a filmmaking future that might offer up some big paychecks — for those who might be willing to take the reins on some of these mega-blockbuster franchises one day, or steady work if you’re interested in production on these behemoths — but continues to create a vacuum that just might, in fact, be the end of “cinema,” as we know it.All images via Marvel Studios.For more filmmaking industry insights, trends, and analysis, here are some other great articles to dive into:Industry Insights: How to Sustain a Career as a Filmmaker5 Advantages of Self-Distributing Your Next Feature FilmFirst-Time Filmmakers: How Do You Build a Cast Without a Budget?Insights into the State of the Music Video Production IndustryFilmmaking Fads and Trends: Don’t Let Them Bother Youlast_img read more

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