Aulds receives ’A’ rating

first_imgAfter a fire destroyed its Inchinnan-based premises in Renfrewshire in September last year, Scottish retail and wholesale bakery Aulds faced a major challenge. The original plant had provided frozen desserts to a range of leading foodservice companies, as well as snack products to high-profile supermarket groups, such as Tesco and Sainsbury’s. And with Christmas approaching – traditionally the busiest period for frozen desserts – the company needed to find a way of building up sufficient stocks to meet customer demand. The company, which also has 44 retail shops supplied by a separate bakery in nearby Greenock, rapidly decided to construct a new semi-permanent facility. It awarded the building contract to temporary structure supplier De Boer. Following initial design and preparation work, it took less than five weeks from the first section of flooring to be laid until the facility was completed and all the necessary equipment sourced. The 210 Aulds staff returned to their new factory on November 14 and production started immediately.Within six weeks of the production line rolling again, EFSIS inspectors had carried out an audit of the temporary facility and awarded it an ‘A-Rated’ accreditation certificate – the highest possible. EFSIS auditors complimented Aulds on how much had been achieved since the fire and commended the high standards of the 2,250sq m facility. The plant features full air conditioning, temperature control, risk separation and full development kitchen and high-tech laboratory facilities. Having been without a factory for eight weeks, the run-up to Christmas proved challenging. But thanks to the hard work of staff and the support of suppliers and customers, Aulds was able to satisfy and retain its existing customer base and attain new business. Aulds production director Donald Burt says: “It is a great testament to our staff that not only did we get back into production so quickly but also received this award from EFSIS.”Aulds is now planning to build a new state-of-the-art permanent factory which it says will match the company’s ambitious strategy for growth in both UK and export markets.last_img read more

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Briefs

first_imgn Three armed robbers wearing balaclavas stole cash from a bakery in Long Melford village, Suffolk, last week. The men threatened staff and customers at The Patisserie with what is believed to be a shotgun and a baseball bat.n Baking expert Dan Lepard has written around 50 new recipes for a 100-page guide in The Guardian’s Saturday, 24 November issue, The Guardian Guide To Baking. The guide features stories from celebrities, including Ronnie Corbett on growing up with a baker for a father.n British Sugar launched a competition to find the UK’s most talented cake decorator at the Cake 2007 show in Birmingham last weekend. Deadline for entries for the new Icecraft Trophy is 31 March, entry is free, and the winner will receive the new Icecraft Trophy and £500. The winner will be chosen at on 16 November at Cake 2008, in the NEC, Birmingham.n Has anyone attempted to burgle your bakery and messed up? A new show for Channel FIVE called Crime Botch, due to be aired in the spring, is appealing to bakery owners across the country to send in CCTV footage of botched crimes. Cash will be paid for the best clips.Call Max, Sam or James on 020 7713 6868 or email [email protected] or [email protected] Scottish ingredients supplier Ingram Bros has asked us to point out that its nut products are manufactured at a third-party site, not its own dedicated factory (see BB, 9 November, pg 8).n Hubbard Ice Systems has announced the death of Trevor Fellowes, technical manager. He died suddenly at his home in Guildford, on 11 November.last_img read more

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viewpoint

first_imgI always think the words ’corporate social responsibility’ are rather unwieldy. To some the word ’corporate’ as in ’corporation’ seems to take little account of smaller producers such as craft bakers. But of course the corporate actually stands for ’we’. The care of the planet and its resources is down to each and every one of us.The baking industry uses masses of water, huge amounts of heat and copious amounts of packaging. These are all vital. You cannot locally source palm-oil (until the planet really heats up) but there are lots of things we can do.I’m sure some new environmental tax lurks just around the corner, so although you may be struggling with commodity price rises, it pays to keep your eye on the ball.My own epiphany came one day when I emerged from a supermarket with about 12 plastic carrier bags and I was struck by the thought that I would probably decompose long before they ever did. In fact, they probably had a thousand year advantage. At least I can probably help a tree to sprout.There is much we cannot change – but lots we can. Premier Foods (Rank Hovis and British Bakeries) plus Warburtons and United Biscuits have already pledged to cut water usage by 20% by 2020 (pg 4).Fosters Bakery owner John Foster, a passionate craft baker with five shops, who makes bread and cakes and supplies Pret A Manger, among others, has reduced the food miles of sandwiches sold in Boots from 236 down to a mere 26 by making a long-term commitment to local farmers to use their wheat (pg 4). At the same time, Welsh organic flour producer Bacheldre Watermill has introduced fully compostable labels.But also in this week’s issue there is an emphasis on effort and triumph. Effort made by the Tameside college students who entered the Bakery World Cup heats for Europain, and should be thoroughly applauded along with their tutors (pg 19), and triumph by Terry Tang in the Renshaw-sponsored Baking Industry Award (pg 16).His tale is a delight, but ladies, having read it, all I can say is next time you go through an airport scanner, and see a probe-like skewer, run a mile!last_img read more

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First Quality sells division

first_imgFirst Quality Foods has sold its couscous packing division to concentrate on its core cereal bar and cake bakery business.The Bristol-based company sold the division, including the Sammy’s brand, to Symington’s – the Leeds-based firm which also packs the Ainsley Harriott brand and own-label products – for an undisclosed sum.First Quality’s managing director Sam Jacobi said: “The sale of the Sammy’s brand and our couscous packing division will enable us to focus on our core businesses, where we feel we can add significant value. We had taken the Sammy’s brand as far as we could and feel that the brand can flourish under the wing of a bigger company. Symington’s seemed the natural home for Sammy’s.”The company’s bakery, Kingsbake, makes Ma Baker flapjacks, cakes, slices and natural fruit-and-nut bars under own-brand and private-label.last_img read more

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Mey makes play for May Day Carbon Label

first_imgFood brand Mey Selections has become the first Scottish consumer goods company to put carbon labels on its products. Its Luxury Shortbread and two honey products will carry the Carbon Trust’s Carbon Reduction Label in stores from 1 May, and the company’s ultimate aim is to have the label on its entire range.Caithness-based Mey Selections is the brand name of North Highlands Products, a company formed by Caithness farmers to select and source supplies of quality farm and food products from the North Highlands.Mey Selections has been working with The Carbon Trust since February 2008, and the label signifies the company’s work to date and commitment to reducing its carbon footprint, it said.“Not only are we the first Scottish consumer goods company to achieve the certification, we are one of the first food and drink companies to become involved with the initiative,” commented John Strak, managing director of Mey Selections.“The Carbon Reduction Label footprinting process provided us with a structure for looking at energy use and carbon emissions. This step is just the beginning of our involvement with the initiative; by the end of 2009, we hope to have the Carbon Reduction Label on our bakery products such as the oatcakes and biscuits. The ultimate aim is to have the label featuring on all of our products.”last_img read more

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Croda boosts Omega 3

first_imgCroda has launched Omelife Smooth, which can be added to a variety of bakery product mixes and enables bakers to state claims regarding the inclusion of Omega 3.Omelife can be added to products such as breads, muffins, nutritional bars and frozen dough – for example to use in a pizza base. For muffins it can be added to dry ingredients at the water phase and doesn’t compromise on taste or flavour, says the company. For use in dough, it can either be added to the mix of flour, water and yeast, for example, or can be pre-mixed into a quantity of the water for quicker incorporation into the mix.Croda says the product has been proven to achieve high inclusions of EPA and DHA (Omega 3 fatty acids). A muffin, for example, would contain 450mg per 50g serving.Omelife is marketed as a way of including the benefits of Omega 3 rich fish in products, but without the smell or taste.www.croda.comlast_img read more

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Fit for purpose: Part 3 – the customer journey

first_imgThere is a simple rule in retail design that, for many years, has been a bit of a design myth: it’s the so-called Right Hand rule. Several food retailers have adopted this rule as the starting point of creating a successful customer journey and it is as simple as it sounds.The Right Hand rule has developed from the observation of shoppers and their natural inclination to head to the right-hand side of the store on entry. This is understood to be a comfortable and natural direction for customers and determines the position of display chillers, fridges and any other point-of-sale en route to the tills. The optimal flow should be a simple square movement moving to the right, up to the till and servery counter, moving to the left and exiting down the left-hand side of the store.Till and servery locations vary across all stores and are inevitably determined by property factors, such as power, water and drainage. But where possible, a counter directly opposite the entrance is the best location as favoured by many chains such as Pret A Manger. This enables staff to catch the attention of customers with direct eye contact on entry to the store and, by simply adding a raised platform behind the tills, staff can communicate with anyone at the back of the queue.What ultimately makes good customer flow is simplicity, movement and a single route with the full product range on offer and no need for retracing steps or crossing queues. Laying out products in a logical fashion, both in terms of fridges and hot cabinets in the store and planograms for product display, aids the overall flow and, in turn, creates a key element of a memorable experience ease of use. A memorable experience is also built on other elements, such as routine, brand awareness and expectation. Marketing your brand values is simple: while customers are queuing, they’re captured and have time to look. It’s also good to create a dedicated space in-store for promotions. It may just be a window, but it’s a place that customers habitually refer to for the latest product or store news. Finally, as with everything in retail, managing customer expectation is vital to any success. Whatever your brand values may say about your product or store, they have to be exceeded for a customer to return and spread the word.l Next month: are corner sites the best?last_img read more

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A case of Jim’ll fix it?

first_imgStop the Week salutes British Baker ’Reporting in’ columnist Jim Winship, who last week starred in BBC1’s long-running current affairs satire Have I Got News for You.The director of the British Sandwich Association made a surprise appearance during the show’s legendary ’guest publication’ round, this time focused on a sandwich industry trade title.Presenters poked fun at a story titled “Salmon and cucumber sandwich provides reassurance in uncertain times of the recession”, which offered readers access to “a full page of facts and figures from the British Sandwich Association on the recession’s impact on the sandwich economy”. Host Gregg Wallace, who was co-presenting with Jon Torode of Masterchef fame, quoted from the story: “It ends with the line: ’for further information please contact Jim Winship on 01632 960875 or 07700 900985’. To be honest, Jim, I think one hotline number is probably enough!” To which panellist Richard Herring fired back, “Not now that it’s been on the telly!”For those of you worried that Jim may have spent the last week fielding crank calls and endless sandwich puns, rest easy. “Fortunately they changed my number!” he tells us.last_img read more

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Sainsbury’s survey reveals preference for digestives

first_imgTo mark a major revamp of Sainsbury’s biscuit range, the retailer has published the results of a survey into the nation’s biscuit-eating habits, which has shown the digestive to be the most popular choice.The supermarket announced it is to launch over 100 new and improved lines  – both own-brand and branded – onto its biscuit aisles this week. New products include Microwaveable Giant Cookies; Whoopie Pie Biscuits; and a new range of sharing bags including Mini Jaffa Cakes and Mini Shortbread Fingers. The survey data revealed that Britons have eaten 141 million packets of biscuits over the past year, which amounts to 2.7m packs per week – 376 packs per minute.According to Sainsbury’s, the digestive biscuit came out on top, with almost 17m packs consumed per year. Coming in second were cookies, followed by jam rings, chocolate fingers and rich teas.New and improved products in the Taste the Difference range include: Dark Chocolate & Pistachio Biscuit Bites; Oaty, Fruit & Nut Biscuit Bites; Belgian Chocolate and Pecan Shortbread Squares; Lemon Curd Shortbread Sandwiches.The data was collated by Nectar from approximately 12 million Sainsbury’s shoppers.In other news it has been rumoured that Ella’s Bakehouse founder and Baking Made Easy presenter Lorraine Pascale is to take over from Jamie Oliver as the face of Sainsbury’s. A spokesperson for Sainsbury’s said: “We are working on a number of new ideas and it is too early to reveal any other plans. We are committed to working with Jamie until the end of this year and will reveal our new plans shortly.”>>Sainsbury’s bakery college receives C & G accreditationlast_img read more

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Holcomb announces $25M in relief funding for Indiana renters

first_img Twitter Previous articleGov. Holcomb warns young Hoosiers to wear face masksNext article14-year-old boy driving vehicle involved in motorcycle crash in South Bend Brooklyne Beatty Facebook Pinterest Pinterest Holcomb announces $25M in relief funding for Indiana renters WhatsApp WhatsApp IndianaLocalNewscenter_img Google+ (“Canyon Drive” by Joe Wolf, CC BY-ND 2.0) $25-million in relief funding will be issued to renters throughout Indiana struggling to pay rent due to the pandemic.Governor Eric Holcomb announced Wednesday the Indiana COVID-19 Rental Assistance Program will provide up to $500 in assistance for four months, totaling a maximum of $2,000 for eligible renters.Assistance will be available to all Indiana residents except those who live in Marion County, as a local $15-million CARES Act-funded program will provide aid to those residents.To be eligible, renters must meet the following criteria:Lost their job, or part of their income, due to COVID-19.Current household income, including unemployment, is less than the household income on March 6.Have not received rental assistance from another source.Approximately 12,000 Indiana households could be helped. Payments will be made directly to the landlord, and the landlord must agree to participate.Applications will be accepted online beginning at 9 a.m. on Monday, July 13 at indianahousingnow.org. Google+ By Brooklyne Beatty – June 25, 2020 0 523 Twitter Facebook TAGSassistancecoronavirusCOVID-19fundinggovernor eric holcombIndianapandemicprogramreliefrental last_img read more

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