Academic Council votes to dissolve Econ dept.

first_imgThe Academic Council voted to dissolve the Department of Economics and Policy Studies (ECOP) at its meeting Thursday.The department will cease to exist effective at the end of the semester.The existing Department of Economics and Econometrics will be renamed the Department of Economics, and will serve as the University’s sole economics department.The University has supported two economics departments since 2003, when the Academic Council voted to split the Department of Economics into Economics and Policy Studies and Economics and Econometrics.Since 2003, the ECOP, which emphasizes alternative economics theories, has not been allowed to hire new faculty members or accept doctoral candidates.John McGreevy, dean of the College of Arts and Letters, initially proposed the dissolution of ECOP last year. Continuing to support two economics departments is “not sustainable,” McGreevy said in September.Fate of the FacultyThe tenure of ECOP faculty members will be respected, McGreevy said. The University is currently working with the faculty to identify new institutional areas for them. McGreevy said he hopes to find new departments for ECOP professors by the end of the semester.Some Policy Studies professors might move to the reestablished Department of Economics, but they will have to be invited by the department itself, McGreevy said.“It’s a mutual process,” he said.McGreevy cited the Kroc Institute, the Kellogg Institute and the Poverty Studies minor as potential homes for ECOP faculty.The Poverty Studies minor is currently administered by the Department of Economics and Policy Studies.“We envision [the minor] as part of the Center for Social Concerns,” McGreevy said.Faculty Senate passed a resolution calling for ECOP faculty to be allowed to return to the reestablished Department of Economics.The resolution protested the “removal of a faculty member from a continuing department without his or her consent.”Because current ECOP faculty members were tenured in the pre-2003 Department of Economics, Faculty Senate claims these faculty members “have been involuntarily excluded from the Department of Economics,” according to the resolution.Faculty Senate was concerned about the “treatment of the faculty in this particular case,” Seth Brown, chair of Faculty Senate’s Administrative Affairs Committee, said. Concerns about Academic FreedomEconomics and Policy Studies faculty members protested the plan to eliminate the department in a letter released last month. The letter expresses the unanimous opinion of the ECOP faculty, department chair Jennifer Warlick said.Dissolving the department would “undermine the strong and vibrant conversation about economics that currently exists within our University,” the letter said.“[The Academic Council’s action] represents a dangerous precedent for academic freedom and university governance,” the letter said.Dissolving the department inhibits ECOP faculty members’ ability to “participate in the education of our students, to conduct our research, and to engage in service activities,” the letter said.The decision to dissolve the department, however, was made in part to broaden the “economics conversation” at the University, McGreevy said.“We’re not eliminating their ideas, and we hope they continue to make as big a contribution as they have made,” he said. “The faculty may be in different units, but I’ve always thought that’s less important than the broader conversation.”McGreevy said the new Department of Economics will be “open to different ideas and methodologies,” as opposed to embracing only one approach to economics.Faculty Senate did not argue “that there was some particular affront to academic freedom in this face,” Brown said.The Senate’s concerns about academic freedom were part of its concerns about tenure. “The purpose of tenure is to safeguard academic freedom,” Brown said.Reducing the protections of tenure makes faculty members less willing to pursue unpopular or cutting-edge research, according to Brown. Student Involvement Student Senate passed a resolution calling for the delay of the decision to dissolve the department last week.“We opposed this on the grounds that student input hasn’t been included,” student body chief of staff Ryan Brellenthin said.Student body president Grant Schmidt said he has gotten feedback from many students.“We emphasized that students were frustrated with the process,” Schmidt said.After the decision was made to dissolve the department, student government hopes to make the Department of Economics as academically viable as possible, Schmidt said.“I have confidence the Economics Department will continue to be successful,” Schmidt said. “It’s important for us to continue to be a part of the conversation.“We want to have a spot at the table when it comes to discussing major academic decisions.”Brellenthin said he hopes to work with McGreevy to “ensure that the aspects of the old department that were beneficial continue to exist,” he said.“We want to make sure the decision doesn’t take anything away from the undergraduate education,” he said.McGreevy cited the sensitive nature of closing a department as a limitation to how much he could dialogue with students before the decision was finalized, but he said he is open to student input. “Students need to take charge of their education at Notre Dame,” he said.McGreevy said he welcomes student involvement in economics now that ECOP has been dissolved.“I am happy to think through with groups of students how we can best build an economics major at Notre Dame,” he said.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s students attend women’s conference

first_imgWhen The Daily Beast’s fifth annual “Women in the World” summit kicked off at the Lincoln Center in New York last Thursday, two Saint Mary’s students were in attendance.Juniors Paige DeRouin and Kaitlyn Rabach (Editor’s Note: Rabach served as the former Saint Mary’s Editor for The Observer) witnessed live journalistic storytelling from global men and women on courage, resilience and the need for positive change, Rabach said.“Tina Brown, former editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast, has really been pushing this newfound style of journalism forward,” Rabach said. “It is focused on storytelling and personal experiences. This three-day summit featured women and men from all generations and walks of life.“All the speakers really told a story. The summit gave them a medium to share their voice.”DeRouin and Rabach currently participate in American University’s Washington Semester Program, an exchange where students study and intern in the nation’s capital..Both are working as interns at iLive2Lead, a non-profit organization providing high-level leadership skills to young women from around the world, DeRouin said. Their internship brought them to New York for the conference, she said.“We could not have picked an better internship while studying in D.C.,” DeRouin said. “iLive2Lead is run by three amazing women, and the organization’s mission is to empower young women all over the world.“They have hosted training summits in nations all over the globe and have served women from over 60 countries. Our bosses understand the importance of mentoring, and have worked to mentor Kaitlyn and I throughout our time at the organization. This push for mentorship is what led us to New York. They wanted us to hear these stories from leaders all over the world.”While at the conference, Rabach said she heard discussions on topics related to human rights issues, especially abuses related to women. Former secretary of state Hillary Clinton and the current managing director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Christine Lagarde were two of the conference’s keynote speakers.“Seeing Secretary Clinton and Madame Lagarde speak was beyond incredible,” Rabach said. “I grew up with these women as my role models. It is women like Hillary Clinton and Christine Lagarde that have shaped my views on feminism and social justice.“They are two of the most influential women in the world and I cannot wait to see what the future brings for them. Both are thinking about their next steps right now – Clinton is contemplating a presidential run in the United States, and Lagarde is doing the same for her home country of France.”While at the conference, Rabach said she had the opportunity to personally interview Lagarde and Ambassador Catherine Russell of the Office of Global Women’s Issues in the State Department. Both DeRouin and Rabach were asked to blog about the conference for The Huffington Post and The Daily Beast, DeRouin said.“Not only was I able to hear some of my role models on stage, but I was actually given the opportunity to go backstage and ask them some questions of my own,” Rabach said. “Both Madame Lagarde and Ambassador Russell have taught me so much about what it means to be a woman, especially in today’s society, and I was able to shake their hands, interview them and really see how great of women they are even behind the scenes.”Another focal point of the conference was hearing stories from Syrian refugees and aid workers, DeRouin said.“In the mainstream media, Syria is often forgotten about,” DeRouin said. “The human rights abuses in Syria were brought up throughout the entire conference, and speakers were calling the conflict the biggest humanitarian failure since Rwanda. … In cases of crisis, women and children are affected the most. I really felt a call to action after the conference.”Both women said this experience was a great addition to their four years at Saint Mary’s.“It was great to see women leaders from all over the world talk about relevant issues,” DeRouin said. “The conversations we were able to hear were directly related to what we have been talking about at Saint Mary’s and in D.C. Plus, Saint Mary’s, iLive2Lead and “Women in the World” are all about empowering women and really forming a sisterhood that spans the globe.”Rabach said the conference encouraged her to be a positive force against some of society’s current evils.“Empowering women is not only a moral and philosophical issue, but it is actually an economic issue,” Rabach said. “Madame Lagarde said, ‘empowering women is a no-brainer” and it really is. … At the end of the conference, Tina Brown encouraged us to be ‘change makers’, and I can’t wait to be a change maker for individuals, especially women and girls, all over the globe.”Tags: New York Citylast_img read more

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Notre Dame designates swimming as club sport

first_imgWhen Kevin Best came to college, one of the first things he did was head to the pool. After swimming every day in high school, it just seemed like the natural thing to do.“There’s way more people who swim at Notre Dame than you would think,” Best, now a junior, said. “There’s way more people who swim at Notre Dame than I would have ever thought.”This community of swimmers — once an informal group of people bonded by a love for the sport — now has an official name: the Notre Dame Swim Club.The club received official recognition from the Student Activities Office (SAO) beginning this academic year. Swimmers trekked out to the Rockne Memorial pool Monday for the inaugural practice.Best, the club’s president, said more than 100 students signed up at the team’s stand at Activities Night.“I think one of the really good things about this is all of our freshmen have this built-in community that they can go to — something we’ve always been used to having with our swim teams,” he said.The club holds practices five days a week; they might add an extra one once football season ends. Junior Stephen Spittler, club treasurer, said there are no requirements for swimmers — the commitment can be as big or as little as one wants it to be.“Some people will come every day and try to relive the glory days of high school,” he said. “And some people will show up once a month. It’s all fine.”Mandy Madden, assistant director of club sports, said swimming is just one of 46 sports offered by the University at a club level. There are some perks that come with the new status, Spittler said.“Before, we were just going and swimming at the Rock or at Rolfe’s,” he said. “But now we actually get lanes set aside for us, which is really nice.”The team also gets to issue official athletic apparel and receives funding to travel to meets. They’ll finally have an official team cap to swap with other teams, Spittler added, a long-lasting tradition at swim meets.“Every team will come and swap a cap with each other,” he said. “It’s one of the little things that’s new and we’ll now be able to do.”Best said he’s most excited to represent the University in a new capacity.“I think it will be really good for us to compete under that name,” he said. “It definitely gives us more credibility.”The club plans to travel to at least two meets this semester — one at Miami University and one at the University of Pittsburgh. They hope to attend even more during the spring semester. And they’re hoping for a big finish: nationals.“Every college club team from the country goes to a big, three-day meet in Georgia,” Best said. “That’s where we want to be at the end of the year.”It’s always fun and exciting to compete, Best said. But for him, it’s more about being a part of a team.“I love going and seeing the same people every day,” he said. “Knowing I’m going to see my friends at this time — friends outside my dorm, outside of my classes — it’s just something I look forward to.”There’s a lot of benefits to be gained from swimming, Spittler said.“I love alone time,” he said. “Swimming is a very productive type of alone time — because yes, you are out there with people. But when you’re underwater, you can’t talk to people. Having that kind of mindless activity just really helps me to relax and calm down after long days.”Both Spittler and Best have met some good friends at the pool, including an assistant rector, an Indiana University South Bend medical school student and upperclassmen in their own dorm.“It isn’t intense or crazy,” Spittler said. “It’s more for the enjoyment of the sport.”Best said 42 swimmers came to the club’s first practice — a number he hopes to increase. The co-ed team welcomes people of all ages, from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross College.“Most of the time, we say to come try it,” he said. “There’s only one way to find out if it’s for you.”Tags: Club Sports, Notre Dame Swim Club, Swimminglast_img read more

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Baumer Hall to host plasma drive to benefit South Bend community

first_imgBaumer Hall, the newest men’s dorm on campus, is sponsoring a plasma drive called “Domers R Donors” to be held  Wednesday from 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the LaFortune Student Center ballroom.Maggie Eastland | The Observer Those who have tested positive for coronavirus in the last three months and have been symptom free for 14 days are eligible to donate, Baumer Hall president and first year Patrick Buck said.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website, those who have contracted and recovered from COVID-19 have antibodies in their blood, specifically in their plasma, that can help treat people in the early stages of the virus.“The hope is that anyone [who is eligible] will donate their plasma so that their antibodies can be used at local South Bend hospitals to help people who are fighting off the pandemic,” Buck said.Anyone who is eligible to donate can sign up by calling 574-204-4466, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., to reserve a time slot.Since Baumer Hall was built in the summer of 2019, the hall has not yet established a signature charity event. The Dillon Hall community was housed last year in Baumer during the renovation of their home dorm.The idea for this charity event originated with Robert Duncheskie, a sophomore in Baumer Hall who said he wanted to make a difference despite the rising case numbers.“As we’re a new dorm, we don’t have a traditional charity event,” Buck said. “We’re always encouraging our guys to come up with stuff, and [Duncheskie] took the lead on this and put in a ton of work.”In an email, Duncheskie said he was inspired to find a way to make a positive impact when Notre Dame’s positive cases began to rise dramatically and many students feared getting sent home earlier this semester.“I wanted to find a way to make the most of out of this unfortunate situation,” Duncheskie said. “I knew that there had to be a way to turn the pandemic into a positive change.”Duncheskie said the event is an exciting step for the Baumer community.“The Baumer Hall community is excited to sponsor this event, as it will be one of the dorm’s first major events since its creation,” he said.Both Buck and Duncheskie said the event is important to help those in need and support the local community.“Our local community is in serious need of plasma donations considering the number of new cases we see every day,” Duncheskie said. “The more plasma that is donated, the more that we can help the people of our community in this ongoing fight against COVID.”Buck said the plasma drive is a way of putting the University’s call to be a “force for good” in action.“This is a really great way to be that positive force,” Buck said. “Fifteen or 20 minutes of your time donating plasma is literally going to save somebody’s life. It’s a really easy thing to do for a person who’s tested positive for COVID. It’s a great way to give back to our South Bend community and help the local people here.”Tags: baumer hall, charity, coronavirus, domers are donors, Plasma drivelast_img read more

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NY Gov. Signs Bill Guaranteeing Paid Leave For Those Under Quarantine

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) ALBANY- New York’s Governor signed a bill Wednesday night that guarantees paid leave for those placed in mandatory or precautionary quarantine due to the novel Coronavirus outbreak.“I just signed into law legislation to provide immediate relief to working New Yorkers whose lives are being turned upside down by COVID-19,” said New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo in a statement.“No one should have to make the impossible choice between losing their job or providing for their family and going to work, especially during this pandemic,” furthered Gov. Cuomo. “We seek to build upon this effort with guaranteed sick leave for all in this year’s budget.”“In New York we stand with our workers in sickness and in health.” last_img read more

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Man Arrested After Allegedly Stabbing Teen In Jamestown

first_imgJAMESTOWN – An 18-year-old is facing charges after allegedly stabbing a teen during an incident in Jamestown Sunday.Jamestown Police say Tyler Hough, 18, was allegedly involved in an altercation in the area of W. 4th Street just before 10 p.m. Sunday.Police say a 16-year-old was stabbed in the leg. The teen was taken to UPMC Chautauqua Hospital for treatment. Police say the teen suffered non-life threatening injuries.Officers say Hough was taken into custody with help from the Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office a short time following the stabbing. He is charged with second-degree assault and endangering the welfare of a child.Police said Hough was held in city jail pending arraignment in the case. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Poll Finds Governor’s Approval Rating Soared During Coronavirus Outbreak

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image by Darren McGee / Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo.ALBANY – A new poll shows that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo job performance ratings have reached new heights, lifted by his handling of the pandemic and the economy.The NBC / Marist poll found that 60% of registered voters rate the Governor’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic as good or excellent.Furthermore, the poll says that 55% of upstate New Yorkers responded positively to his handling of the virus, compared to 67% of those in New York City. Additionally, 69% of upstaters approve of his leadership during the pandemic, compared to 75% in the NYC.As for his handling of the economy, 52% of those in upstate New York approve of his economic decisions, while 63% in the New York City agree. The poll also found that 86% of Democrats, 65% of independents, and 28% of Republican approve of the governor.Full polling results are posted below:Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more infolast_img read more

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Rob Ashford for The Sound of Music Live!, David Mamet & the Tony Awards Broadcast Earn DGA Nominations

first_imgTony winner Rob Ashford, Beth McCarthy-Miller and the directing team of NBC’s broadcast of The Sound of Music Live! have been nominated for a Directors Guild Award in the category of Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Movies for Television and Mini-Series. This is Ashford’s first DGA Award nomination. Also nominated in the same category is Pulitzer Prize winner David Mamet for his HBO film Phil Spector, which starred Al Pacino. Watch the now epic opening number of the 2013 Tony Awards featuring host Neil Patrick Harris and casts from numerous musicals! In addition, Glenn Weiss and the directing team of the 67th Annual Tony Awards have been nominated for a Directors Guild Award in the category of Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Musical Variety. This marks the tenth nomination for Weiss, who has served as director of the Tony Awards broadcast since 2001. He previously won the award in 2007, 2010, 2011 and 2012. The winners will be announced at a ceremony hosted by Broadway vet Jane Lynch on February 25.center_img View Commentslast_img read more

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We Rank the Dads of Broadway From Best to Worst!

first_imgIt’s almost Father’s Day, and you know what that means—it’s time to pull out all the stops to show your dad you’re his biggest fan. But Father’s Day isn’t just an opportunity to make a giant replica of your dad out of beef jerky. It’s also time to pay homage to our honorary fathers: The dads of Broadway! From the loyal and protective Jean Valjean in Les Miz to the uh, totally preoccupied Mr. Wormwood, some of Broadway’s current dads deserve Father of the Year trophies, while others should be tarred and feathered. We’re ranking them all below! How does your favorite Broadway dad measure up? 10. Charles from Pippin He might be good at riding a unicycle, but King Charles is constantly dismissive of his son Pippin. If there’s one thing we know about kids, it’s that they need constant attention! Get it together, Charles. View Comments 9. Walter from A Raisin in the Sun Walter has big dreams for his family, but he’s not the most rational guy when it comes to spending his money. Good thing you’ve got your mom around to bail you out, Walter. 2. Mufasa from The Lion King This kind and majestic ruler is a model father for Simba. It’s a shame that pesky stampede had to go and ruin everything. 7. Sultan from Aladdin The Sultan seems like a nice enough guy, but he’s got some seriously outdated opinions about a woman’s place in the kingdom. Don’t worry—his daughter Jasmine is more than happy to set him straight. 1. Jean Valjean from Les Miserables Even though JVJ isn’t Cosette’s biological dad, he’ll go to the ends of the earth for her. He confines her to her house and she’s not allowed to talk to anyone or go outside, but at least she’s safe, right? 4. Josh from If/Then Without giving away too many spoilers, Josh is a great guy and seems like a great father, but he just isn’t around that much. Give us more evidence and we’ll move you higher up on the list, Josh. 8. Hertz from Rock of Ages Sure, he’s planning to tear down the Sunset Strip and his mustache is pretty annoying, but as far as his parenting is concerned, he’s not the worst dad on the list. 11. Mr. Wormwood from Matilda This telly-watching, swindling used-car salesman is the worst father on Broadway, hands down. If you were Matilda, you’d dye his hair green, too. 5. The Three Dads from Mamma Mia! Just like the guys in Full House, potential dads Sam Carmichael, Bill Austin and Harry Bright are a package deal. Sure, they weren’t around for Sophie’s formative years, but that wasn’t their fault, now was it? 3. Father from Violet Violet’s dad tries his best to be a good father, and hey, that axe thing was an accident. But we’re subtracting a few points, because the whole ordeal does make his daughter’s life pretty complicated. 6. Mr. Price from Kinky Boots He’s done everything he possibly can to provide for Charlie, but he shouldn’t have automatically assumed his son would want to take over the family business. What if he’d wanted to become a softball player, or a drag queen?last_img read more

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Trae Harris & More Will Star in Naomi Wallace’s And I and Silence Off-Broadway

first_img Related Shows View Comments Scenic design will be by Rachel Hauck, with costume design by Clint Ramos, lighting design by Bradley King, and sound design by Elisheba Ittoop. Trae Harris (Orange Is the New Black) and more will appear in the previously announced And I and Silence off-Broadway. Written by Naomi Wallace and directed by Caitlin McLeod, the show will play a limited engagement August 5 through September 14. Opening night is set for August 25 at the Romulus Linney Courtyard Theatre at The Pershing Square Signature Center. Two imprisoned teenagers, one black, one white, form a perilous bond.  As the young women serve time, they forge a plan for survival. When the outside world proves even more dangerous than the jail itself, their private world becomes an untenable practice ground for their new lives. And I and Silence explores the fierce dreams of youth and the brutal reality of adulthood in 1950’s America.center_img And I And Silence Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 14, 2014 Joining Harris as Young Jamie will be Rachel Nicks (Nurse Jackie) as Jamie, Emily Skeggs (Fun Home) as Young Dee and Samantha Soule (A Fable) as Dee.last_img read more

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