Bottom on Top! Eight Pics of Something Rotten! Star Brian d’Arcy James Winning a SAG Award!

first_img Star Files Billy Crudup, Brian d’Arcy James & Mark Ruffalo at the 22nd Annual Screen Actor Guild Awards (Photo: Jason Merritt/Getty Images) Yup, that’s Broadway’s Brian d’Arcy James, who won a Screen Actors Guild Award on January 30 at the Shine Auditorium in Hollywood! (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)Hi Brian! (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)He won it for his first leading film role, playing Boston Globe journalist Matt Carroll in the acclaimed Spotlight. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)All seven of the film’s stars won in Outstanding Performance by the Cast of a Motion Picture category. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)So James got to pose with all his fancy Hollywood friends and their new green man trophies. Oh hey, Broadway vets Billy Crudup, Mark Ruffalo, John Slattery and Liev Schreiber! Hope to see you on the boards soon, Rachel McAdams and Michael Keaton! (Photo by Rich Polk/Getty Images)The Spectacular Seven beat out the casts of Beasts of No Nation, The Big Short, Straight Outta Compton and Trumbo for the win! (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)As the cameras snapped away, James was beaming with excitement and now looking at the pics, we can’t help but beam with Broadway pride. (Photo by Rich Polk/Getty Images)Can’t wait to see what you do next, Brian. But for now, we’re happy we’ve got you on Broadway. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)Is this Bottom on top or what? Related Shows Something Rotten! Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 1, 2017 View Comments OMG. Did you hear?! Did you see it on TV?? Brian d’Arcy Jameslast_img read more

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Video Odds & Ends: Sara Bareilles Teams Up With Leslie Odom Jr. & More

first_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories videos you may have missed today. Sara Bareilles Teams Up With Leslie Odom Jr. Waitress scribe Sara Bareilles was asked by This American Life to imagine what President Obama might be thinking about the current election and Donald Trump, but can’t say publicly. She enlisted Hamilton Tony winner Leslie Odom Jr. to perform the song below and Velvet smoke did not disappoint! Seriously. View Comments Mary-Louise Parker Shows Off Her Maple SyrupMary-Louise Parker is currently starring in Heisenberg on Broadway and she stopped by The Late Show on October 27 to discuss Simon Stephens’ latest play and more. The Tony winner revealed she spends most of her free time on a farm, tending to her goats and tapping trees to make maple syrup. As you do! The production is playing at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre. Star Files New Trailer for Lesli Margherita FilmNaughty language alert! We have the latest trailer for musical comedy Opening Night, which stars Lesli Margherita, Topher Grace, Taye Diggs, JC Chasez and more. Directed by Isaac Rentz, the film follows a failed Main Stem star who ends up as a stage manager; it will be available on VOD from November 18. P.S. Here’s a first listen to Alessia Cara singing the Lin-Manuel Miranda track “How Far I’ll Go” from Moana. Lesli Margherita Santino Fontana’s Latest Crazy Ex-Girlfriend NumberCheck out this sneak peek at the newest song from the second season of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend. Much as we love Tony nominee Santino Fontana, we’re not sure we’ll be drinking with him anytime soon…The show airs Fridays at 9PM/8PM Central on The CW. Leslie Odom Jr.last_img read more

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Sheryl Lee Ralph & Kara Lindsay Start Performances in Wicked

first_img from $95.00 Sheryl Lee Ralph & Kara Lindsay(Photo: Joan Marcus) View Comments Related Showscenter_img Wicked They’ll be spending more than one short day in the land of Oz! Dreamgirls Tony nominee Sheryl Lee Ralph and previous Glinda (and Broadway.com vlogging fave) Kara Lindsay begin performances in Wicked on November 1 as Madame Morrible and Glinda, respectively. Ralph steps in for Judy Kaye, while Lindsay returns to the bubble following Carrie St. Louis; Kaye and St. Louis exited the popular tuner on October 30, the production’s lucky 13th anniversary.Ralph earned a Tony nomination for her performance as Deena in the original production of Dreamgirls. She made her Broadway debut in Reggae and last appeared as Muzzy in Thoroughly Modern Millie in 2002. On the small screen, she’s known for playing Dee Mitchell in Moesha, as well as performances in Ray Donovan, It’s a Living and Instant Mom.Lindsay first rode Glinda’s bubble on tour before assuming the role on Broadway in December 2014. She appeared in the original cast of Broadway’s Newsies as Katharine and took home a Broadway.com Audience Choice Award alongside her co-star Jeremy Jordan. Earlier this year, Lindsay took on the title role in Mary Poppins at North Carolina Theatre.The current cast of Wicked also includes Jennifer DiNoia as Elphaba, Michael Campayno as Fiyero, Peter Scolari as the Wizard, Michael Genet as Doctor Dillamond, Zachary Noah Piser as Boq and Dawn E. Cantwell as Nessarose.last_img read more

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Turfgrass Institute

first_imgBy Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaExperts from across the Southeast will share their knowledge Dec.6-7 during the annual Turfgrass Institute and Trade Show at theGwinnett Civic and Cultural Center in Duluth, Ga.”This year’s show includes many educational opportunitiesfeaturing some of the industry’s top speakers,” said BenjieBrumbleloe, president of the Georgia Turfgrass Association. “Theindustry’s leading companies will also be on hand at the tradeshow.” Numerous sponsorsGTA presents the institute in cooperation with UGA and theGeorgia Irrigation Association, Georgia Professional GolfersAssociation, Georgia Recreation and Parks Association, GeorgiaSod Producers Association, Georgia Water Wise Council, NorthGeorgia Landscape and Turf Association, Professional Lawn CareAssociation of America, Sports Turf Managers Association and U.S.Golf Association Green Section. Numerous speakersThe following University of Georgia scientists will share thelatest turfmanagement research findings:* Jean Williams-Woodward will speak on managing new pests inSouthern landscapes.* Tim Murphy and Mark Czarnota will discuss weed management inturf and ornamentals.* Bob Carrow will talk on cultivation and topdressing practicesand on managing turfgrass in shaded areas.* Rose Mary Seymour will discuss changes to storm-watermanagement requirements.* Gil Landry will cover transitioning overseeded grasses.* And Clint Waltz will lead a session geared to helpingprofessional landscapers handle unhappy customers.Scientists from the universities of Tennessee and Florida willshare their expertise, too.The first afternoon will offer a choice of concurrent sessions inlandscape, golf or sports and commercial turf. Each track willinclude four topics focused in that area.The institute includes a trade show with exhibits from more than50 turf-related companies and associations and silent auctionseach day. The trade show will also include appearances by theAtlanta Falcon Cheerleaders.The cost to attend both days is $180 ($130 for GTA members).After Nov. 18, it’s $230 ($180 GTA) for both days. One-day feesare $140 ($90 GTA), or $190 ($140 GTA) after Nov. 18. The fee forthe trade show and luncheon only, for either day, is $20 ($15GTA) or $25 ($20 GTA) after Nov. 18.For more on the Turfgrass Institute and Trade Show, or to signup, call (800) 687-6949, or e-mail the GTA office atgta@turfgrass.org.last_img read more

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Sweet treat

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity ofGeorgiaIt may not come in cute little Dawg-shaped bottles, but University of Georgia honey still sells like “wild cakes.”“It has been selling like wild cakes, no, hot cakes and wildfire,” said Jennifer Berry, a University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences research coordinator. “We sent out the Christmas honey announcement, and we’ll probably sell out of it by Dec. 19.”Berry’s face lights up as she talks about honey and honey bees at her office at UGA’s bee laboratory. Three years ago, the lab needed funding for student and seasonal workers. Then it clicked. They could sell their surplus honey.UGA’s honey bees produce up to 200 pounds of honey a year, Berry said. Bee colonies only need about 60 pounds for food.Even with some initial doubts, the honey sold well the first year. In 2004, with between 25 and 30 colonies set aside for honey production, the UGA program sold 4,000 pounds of honey. Although honey is a $75 million industry in Georgia, it often goes unnoticed. “Politicians don’t have a clue that we exist,” Berry said.It’s not just the honey the industry produces that makes it important. Farmers need bees to pollinate their crops. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Verroa mite almost destroyed the wild bee population in Georgia. Beekeepers were able to treat their honeybees for the mites, but the wild bees didn’t have this protection. Now, farmers in the lower part of the state often rent honey bees for pollination.Berry keeps the latest buzz about honey bee production in politicians’ ears by sending UGA honey to state officials. “This helps them understand the importance of honey bees,” she said, “not just to our economy, but also to our ecology.”For information on buying UGA Honey Bee Farm Pure Natural Honey, contact Detsy Bridges at (706) 542-9035 by Dec. 16.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) This year, when CAES research professional Detsy Bridges sent out an e-mail in the late fall saying the entomology department had honey for sale, the response was immediate.“The first day we sent the e-mail out, I had five calls in five minutes,” said Bridges.Labeled as UGA Honey Bee Farm Pure Natural Honey, the honey is a little more expensive than the average grocery store variety. Besides the production costs, the honey is pure, meaning that it comes from a particular source of nectar, Berry said.Supermarket honey is often a random blend of honeys from several different countries. The end product, which Berry and her colleagues call “mutt honey,” is a mixture of whichever honey manufacturers receive at the time. It’s like comparing a really good beer, like Guinness, to Schlitz, or a fine, well-made wine to a lesser brand, she said.“When you’re harvesting a particular plant, there’s a lot of time, a lot of work that’s involved,” she said. “People who have bought our honey are coming back because they love the way it tastes.”In Oconee County, Ga., where the UGA Honey Bee Laboratory is located, blackberry, blueberry and bramble blooms give the honey its pale, golden color and flowery, fruity flavor. “It doesn’t have a real strong aftertaste,” Berry said. “It has a real smooth flavor to it.”In January, cotton bloom honey will be for sale. The honey bee program also sells sourwood honey.Prices for the UGA honey are similar to local market prices. But, Berry says the program strives not to compete with local producers. The honey is sold primarily on the UGA campus and at Athens, Ga., restaurant Farm 255. A quart is $8; pint, $5; 16 ounces, $4; and a honey bear is $3.50. They also package special-order sizes for weddings and other special occasions.Being a UGA product, Berry considered having a Dawg-shaped container instead of the traditional honey bear dispenser. The honey bear won out when Berry discovered the dog-shaped dispense mold would cost $30,000.last_img read more

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Shocking results

first_imgWorking with CAES poultry scientist Scott Russell, Hung tested both forms of EO water on fresh chicken carcasses. They found the acidic EO water killed foodborne pathogens on the chicken. The alkaline EO water cleaned the chicken. “We wanted to use the water on chicken carcasses to see if it cuts down on the levels of salmonella and campylobacter,” said Yen-Con Hung, a food scientist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Two steams of waterEO water is created when a saltwater solution goes through an electrolysis process, said Hung. It separates the water’s positive and negative ions. This makes two forms of water, one very acidic and one very alkaline. Hung hopes to see the technology used in U.S. fast food restaurants. Widely used in Japan and KoreaThe technology is widely used in Japan to sanitize dental and medical equipment. Many Japanese homes have EO washing machines that need no detergent. Koreans use it in dishwashers. In his laboratory on the UGA Griffin, Ga., Campus, Hung has found the acidic water effectively kills harmful bacteria on eggs, apples, lettuce and cutting boards. The alkaline water is a useful general cleanser. In the U.S., the wholesale and retail cut flower industry uses the water to prevent the spread of diseases and extend shelf life. “And the water doesn’t have to be changed every day,” Hung said. “The alkaline stream of EO water mixes with the fat on the chicken and cleanses the surface and protects the carcass in the future,” Russell said. “It’s just like when your grandmother mixed fat and lye to make soap.” Technology licensed and used in U.S.Pennsylvania-based Murray’s Chickens is the first poultry processor in the United States to use the UGA EO process to kill pathogens, Hung said. EAU Technology holds the license on the UGA technology. “In mass production, this technology would be very cost effective,” Hung said. “When you want to use it, you push a button. You don’t have to worry with mixing up concentrated liquids, and it’s more effective than chlorine rinses.” By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaWater is one of the world’s most precious resources. But if you combine it with salt and an electrical charge, it becomes one of the strongest disinfectants, too. Scientists at the University of Georgia are studying ways to use electrolyzed oxidized water, or EO water, to sanitize fresh chicken in processing plants along with other things. It can be up to 10 times more effective at killing harmful bacteria than traditional methods. “We’ve had several outbreaks of foodborne illness related to fast food. This could help prevent future cases,” Hung said.last_img read more

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Rain crop

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaThe Rain Harvesting Workshop and Accreditation Program will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 20 at the Oconee County Civic Center in Watkinsville, Ga. The training is a part of the American Rain Catchment System Association’s professional accreditation program and is open to the public.Participants will learn how to design rain harvest systems, which include downspouts, cisterns, rain barrels, water features, filters, pumps, pipes, water quality and irrigation options. The cost is $10 and covers lunch, breaks and print material.“In order to improve water conservation in northeast Georgia, the University of Georgia and Texas A&M University have teamed up to offer this in-depth training to professionals and homeowners,” said Frank Henning, a UGA Cooperative Extension watershed agent. “Come join us to learn how to conserve water and save money on your water bill.”For more information or to register, go to the Web site www.caes.uga.edu/unit/athens/events/events.html. Or, call (706) 542-0808.last_img read more

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Pretty pest

first_imgBy Sharon DowdyUniversity of GeorgiaDespite its dainty name, the lace bug can cause major headaches for nurserymen and homeowners across the country. University of Georgia researchers recently identified a species that has never been recorded in Georgia. And, it has taken a liking to ornamental grasses.Over the past three years, UGA entomologist Kris Braman has evaluated ornamental grasses in plots on the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Griffin, Ga., campus. This summer, she and CAES graduate student Evelyn Carr discovered lace bugs on an experimental line of ornamental grass called Pennisetum. Feed on trees and ornamentals, tooLace bugs commonly feed on azaleas, chrysanthemums, cotoneasters and sycamores, Carr said, but not on ornamental grasses.Lace bugs live on the undersides of leaves. When feeding, they stick their mouthparts into the leaf and suck out the cell contents. This causes the top side of the leaf to be discolored with white dots. They can further discolor leaves by laying their eggs on the undersides.“They stress the plant and harm it aesthetically,” Carr said. “So on our ornamental grasses, its damage would be considered very extensive.”Making a big problem biggerLeft unchecked, the tiny pest could have a definite economic impact on the state’s landscape industry. “Ornamental grasses have become a staple in the landscape,” Carr said. “You see them everywhere.” Georgia nurserymen, landscapers and homeowners spend more than $1.7 million annually to control lace bugs on ornamental plants. The pest still causes more than $300,000 in damage each year.To properly identify the new species, they sent a sample to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Systematic Entomology Laboratory in Maryland. It was identified as Leptodictya plana.“This is a species we know very little about,” Carr said. “There’s only been one scientific paper published on it.”Lots to learn about new speciesAs part of her thesis, Carr plans to determine the lace bug’s biology, origin, reproductive traits and more. “The ultimate goal is to determine the best way to control it,” she said. This species is closely related to the sugarcane lace bug which is a huge problem in Hawaii and South America, she said. “It’s normally found in Texas, Mississippi, Arizona and other dry states,” she said. “Dr. Braman hypothesizes that it has increased in Georgia because of the dry weather associated with the drought.”This lace bug species could cause problems in Georgia, but it can benefit some regions, she said.“Out West they are looking at this (lace bug) as a good thing,” Carr said. “It feeds on bufflegrass which is considered a noxious weed there.”Braman and Carr are raising this lace bug species in their laboratories to identify other plants it will feed on.last_img read more

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Gardening in Georgia

first_imgGardeners, start your tillers! The race is on to get those beds, lawns and gardens ready for spring. And for winning gardening advice, tune into the new season of “Gardening in Georgia with Walter Reeves,” starting Saturday, April 4.The show’s 10th season will air on Georgia Public Broadcasting stations across the state each Saturday at 12:30 p.m., repeating Saturdays at 6:30 p.m. and again on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. through the end of October. By Faith PeppersUniversity of Georgia “We are glad to once again bring the proven horticultural information from our college to Georgians who need it,” said J. Scott Angle, dean and director of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and executive producer of the show. “Walter Reeves’ experience, knowledge and sense of what local gardeners like makes him the perfect host to deliver it.”New this season, Reeves will visit Georgia homeowners and help fix their landscape problems or design a garden for them. “One homeowner we visited wanted a scented garden,” Reeves said. “So, we helped her plant scented gardenias and other great smelling plants.” “Gardening in Georgia” is produced by the UGA CAES and supported by gifts from McCorkle Nurseries, the Georgia Urban Agriculture Council and the Georgia Green Industry Association. Viewers can check out the show’s archives and useful publications at the Web site www.gardeningingeorgia.com. There is also information for college students and adults interested in a horticulture career.This year, CAES has joined with University of Florida Extension to create a news series called “Your Southern Garden,” which will air on Florida Public Broadcasting stations in the northern half of that state. Several UF experts will be on “Gardening in Georgia,” too.For more on “Your Southern Garden,” go to www.yoursoutherngarden.com.(Faith Peppers is a news editor for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Gardening In Georgia

first_imgUniversity of Georgia The final episode of “Gardening in Georgia with Walter Reeves” will air on Georgia Public Broadcasting stations Oct. 10 at 12:30 p.m. and again at 6 p.m.For 10 years, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Georgia Public Broadcasting provided the show for Georgia viewers to get the latest in gardening advice and research. But fans shouldn’t fret. Show host Walter Reeves will be back next season with “Your Southern Garden.” Produced by CAES and University of Florida Extension, the show will include experts and gardeners from across Georgia and north Florida.“Our tenth anniversary seems like a good time to venture into a new phase of garden education,” Reeves said. “’Your Southern Garden’ broadens our reach and the exciting new material we can cover.”The last “Gardening in Georgia” will finish its run with an exotic flair. They are so beautiful and alluring smugglers risk their lives to steal and sell them on the black market. On the Oct. 10 episode, Becky Brinkman, curator of orchids at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, will bring Reeves several rare and exotic orchids and explain where they live and how they can be grown indoors.They look like warts on the pecan leaves, but pecan phylloxera galls are actually the handiwork of insects. Reeves will give his official prescription for treatment.When you are cleaning house, don’t forget the houseplants. Their leaves can collect dust just like countertops. All you need to do the job is a clean white sock.It’s beautiful, but bamboo can be quite rambunctious in the wrong place. Bamboo expert Alexis Caffre shows Reeves several ways to control the unruly plant in the landscape.“Gardening in Georgia” has been produced by the CAES and supported by a gift from McCorkle Nurseries. Learn more about the show and download useful publications at the Web site www.gardeningingeorgia.com.last_img read more

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