MH370 search over a larger area than Australia

first_imgSource = ETB News: T.N Malaysian authorities said that the search area had now reached 2.24 million nautical miles squared, the Guardian reported. Malaysia is also urging countries located on one of the two flight corridors being looked at to re-examine their flight radars, in order to help narrow down the search area. Malaysia’s Defence and Acting Transport Minister Hishamuddin Hussein said that other countries were taking the lead in trying to find where the plane may have been diverted. The 27 countries taking part in the search for the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, are looking over an area larger than the size of Australia. “All efforts are being used now to reduce the [search] area – looking at satellite data; seeking assistance from other friends who have satellite capability; asking if they have looked [at radar data] to relook at them; finally, the use of assets whether in air or at sea,” Mr Hussein said. A separate criminal investigation is being conducted in parallel with the worldwide search but the agencies involved are not willing to speak to the media.  If the plane was diverted using a flight computer, it is more likely that the diverting was a deliberate act by someone with considerable knowledge of plane computer systems. The facts behind the flight’s last whereabouts are getting more difficult to glean, with local agencies reporting that the plane was diverted from its path from Malaysia to China by someone who used the plane’s flight computer, rather than manual controls.last_img read more

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Virgin Australia announces various new codeshares

first_imgVirgin Australia today announced that for the first time it is offering a codeshare flight with South Africa’s largest carrier, South African Airways.Virgin will commence codeshare on South African Airways’ daily direct services from Perth to Johannesburg, with fares available for sale from Tuesday 14 October 2014.Members of Virgin Australia’s Velocity Frequent Flyer program will now have the ability to earn Points and Status Credits when flying between Perth and Johannesburg on the Virgin Australia codeshare flights.Virgin Australia chief commercial officer, Judith Crompton has said that this new codeshare is a great opportunity for Virgin and the customers.“This new codeshare enables our customers to connect seamlessly from our domestic services through to South Africa and gives our customers in Western Australia more choice,” said Ms Crompton.The airline also announced they will be expanding their partnership in North America with Delta Air Lines by adding three new destinations as part of their codeshare agreement.Customers of both airlines will now be able to fly from Australia to Nashville, Kansas City and Raleigh/Durham as part of the alliance’s continued commitment to strengthening its footprint in the US market.The growing alliance between the two airlines, which was launched in 2011, now offers Australians access to over 245 destinations across North and Central America.“Thanks to our strong alliance with Delta Air Lines we now have over 245 codeshare and interline destinations available to our customers,” said Ms Crompton.The convenient direct services to and from Los Angeles will give Virgin Australia customers greater direct connections between all three cities in the US and our inbound travellers more access to the Virgin Australia’s domestic and international network. Source = ETB News: Lewis Wisemanlast_img read more

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Record number of ships cruising down under this summer

first_imgAustralians’ passion for cruising has fuelled the nation’s biggest ever summer cruise season, with a record flotilla of cruise ships sailing Down Under over the coming months – including many newcomers to our shores.According to peak cruise industry body Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) Australasia, 38 ships from its member cruise lines will sail in Australian waters this summer, with an unprecedented eight ships making their maiden visits to Australia.Over the 2014-15 summer cruise period, 36 CLIA member cruise ships visited Australia, including three ships making their inaugural visit.CLIA Australasia Commercial Director Brett Jardine said the growth in maiden ship visits was another clear indicator of the surging popularity of cruising.“Cruise lines around the world are looking for new destinations and new homeports for their ships – and Australia is hot property right now,” Mr Jardine said. “Not only do we have fantastic ports to visit and great weather, we also have a population that can’t wait to cruise, and that’s encouraging more cruise lines to send more ships our way.”Mr Jardine said the eight ships making their maiden visits this summer ranged from superliners to boutique-sized ships, providing a wide range of cruise experiences.“The huge range of ships now calling to Australia just illustrates that cruising is popular across all age groups and holidaymaker types – there really is a cruise ship for everyone.”Mr Jardine said more than one million Australians took a cruise in 2014, with Australia leading the world in terms of growth in cruise passenger numbers and market penetration.CLIA’s new cruise season statistics, which coincide with the start of CLIA’s fourth national Cruise Week promotion, show that there will be 38 member cruise line ships cruising local waters over the peak summer cruise season which runs from the end of September through to April 30, 2016. Between them, the ships will make more than 800 calls to Australian ports.The cruise season will kick off with the arrival of Princess Cruises’ Diamond Princess in Sydney on September 29, with the ship based in Sydney for a season of 14 cruises over summer.The bumper 2015-16 season will see Azamara Club Cruises make its first ever call to Australia with its ship Azamara Quest arriving in local waters in January 2016.Other ships making their Australian debut during the season include Costa Cruises’ Costa Luminosa, Holland America Line’s Noordam, P&O Cruises’ Pacific Aria and Pacific Eden, Ponant’s Le Soleal, Princess Cruises’ Golden Princess and Royal Caribbean’s Explorer of the Seas.Mr Jardine said 21 ships would make a total of 330 roundtrip cruises from Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Brisbane and Fremantle over the 2015-16 summer, with these cruises expected to generate more than $300 million for the economy through passenger and crew spending, provedoring and associated port charges.The figures are a significant increase on last year’s 253 roundtrip cruises. CLIA Cruise Week Source = Cruise Lines International Association Australasialast_img read more

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The most and least loved safari tourists according to African safari o

first_imgThe Most and Least Loved Safari Tourists According to African Safari OperatorsSafariBookings.com, the largest online marketplace for African safari tours conducted this extensive survey. In similar surveys for other destinations, Americans are often one of the least favored tourists. But not in Africa. They love Americans. No less than 85% of the surveyed operators rated Americans as pleasant to very pleasant. They indicated Americans are friendly, have great humor, and tip generously.Italians are the least favored safari touristsAlthough operators appreciate clients from all nationalities, Italians were the least loved. More than 18% of operators found Italians to be annoying, or very annoying. They indicated Italians are ruder, seldom on time, and often completely ignore the guide’s instructions. On the bright side, the survey also shows Italians are easy to please.Brazilians are notorious latecomers and the Dutch are least likely to tipThe survey also included other stereotypes. Brazilians love life… and are the 2nd worst latecomers, after Italians. A stunning 45% of operators indicated Dutch to be the worst tippers. Of all other nationalities, only the French came close to them in the “poor tipping” department.British are hard to please, Germans most punctualOverall, British tourists did very well. Operators hold them in high regard. They said British are polite, on time, and pay attention to the guide’s instructions. The only point of criticism was, according to 55% of operators, the British are most hard to please. Germans are considered to be most punctual. Over 61% of operators indicated Germans are always on time. Regarding punctuality, British and Germans scored significantly better than other nationalities.Native English speakers are more friendly and more funSurprising was that nationalities who have English as their native language scored much better than non-English nationalities. We were unable to explain exactly why, but we suspect that having English as the native language makes it easier to communicate with the tour guide.Differences between operators in East and Southern AfricaOperators in East Africa are especially fond of American tourists. In Southern Africa, operators are more charmed by British and Canadian tourists. In South Africa they like their national tourists least, although they do think South Africans have a good laugh and are fun to be with.Source = SafariBooking.comlast_img read more

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Thailands cultural capital Chiang Mai gets extreme makeover

first_imgakyra Manor Chiang Mai is one of the leaders of the new stylish, boutique hospitality movement in Chiang MaiThailand’s cultural capital Chiang Mai gets extreme makeoverThailand’s legacy Chiang Mai tourism market has undergone a millennial transformation that is now tapping into a new base of travelers seeking authentic Thai experiences. Last year over 4.6 million arrivals at the city’s international gateway thrust the destination into a new light, as the passenger volume only trailed Phuket in terms of provincial airports in the country.According to C9 Hotelworks’ latest market research Chiang Mai Hotel Market Overview much of the growth has been fueled by rising low-cost carriers, with 5,346 flights from Greater China last year.CLICK HERE for full report.An expert overview of the past ten years of tourism in Chiang Mai.  Over the past 10-years passenger arrivals have shot up by three-fold with 2013 being the turning point fueled by the epic success of the Chinese film’ Lost in Thailand’. Noting the explosive impact of cinematic wanderlust on tourism, C9’s Managing Director Bill Barnett said: “Be it ‘Eat Pray Love’ or ‘Notting Hill’, the impact of film in destination marketing is remarkable. While Thailand’s travel market outside of Bangkok shifted to the beach in the early millennium, a rising tide of Asian travelers and westerners increasingly want into the culture club instead of the atypical surf and turf.”As Thailand’s government has pivoted its tourism ambition from quantity to quality, Chiang Mai has fit nicely into the equation with a range of impressive new boutique hotels, a rampant art scene and budding culinary offerings the shift is resonating with Thai and foreign travelers alike. One of the most eagerly awaited entries to the creative scene was the debut of the MAIIAM Museum of Creative Art in mid-2016. This 3,000 square meter facility has attracted global attention.“We are certainly seeing increasing demand for personalized itineraries for Chiang Mai – for both the city itself and also a connecting city to explore the far north of Thailand,” said ASIA DMC Thailand Managing Director Andre van der Marck. “Strong domestic airlift is helping access while the increase of creative, boutique accommodation is an ideal match with the experiential millennial travelers we see more and more.”Looking into the prospects for 2017, while the government instituted a crack in zero-baht tours from Mainland China in the mid part of last year, the impact is normalizing given strong demand from Thai domestic travelers who are being drawn to a different Chiang Mai experience.Digital media is super charging the pace of change as millennials abandon guidebooks and replace them with smartphones and a new mode of travel driven by authentic local experiences and a lifestyle of sharing thanks to Facebook and Instagram.Source = C9 Hotelworkslast_img read more

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Lufthansa Group welcomes almost 10 million passengers on board in Marc

first_imgfthansaLufthansa Group welcomes almost 10 million passengers on board in March 2017The airlines of the Lufthansa Group transported some 9.6 million passengers in March, 14% more than the same period last year, although the popular Easter travel time started at the beginning of  April. In the first quarter, 25.2 million passengers, , travelled with the Lufthansa Group, amounting to13% more than the previous year. Total capacity for the month was up to 9.9% in available seat-kilometer terms and total traffic volume, measured in revenue passenger-kilometers, increased by 11%. The seat load factor improved accordingly, rising 0.8 percentage points to 77.2%, compared to March 2016. For the first quarter, both the available seat-kilometers increased to 9.5% and the traffic volume to 11.3%. This results in having an increase in the seat load factor up to 76.7% and thus, a rise of 1.2 percentage points, compared to the previous year. Pricing was slightly positive in March on a currency-neutral basis.Cargo capacity increased 6.7% year-on-year, while cargo sales were up 13.3% in revenue tonne-kilometer terms. As a result, the Cargo load factor showed a corresponding improvement, rising 4.3 percentage points for the month. Total capacity in the first quarter was up to 3.6% and cargo sales were up to 8.3% and the cargo load factor increased 3.0 percentage points, compared to 2016.Hub airlinesNetwork airlines Lufthansa, Swiss and Austrian Airlines carried 7.4 million passengers in March, 4.5% more than in the prior-year period. A total of 19.7 million passengers flew with network airlines in the first quarter, equaling 3.5 more percentage points than the previous year. . Capacity increased by 1.5%, while the sales volume was up 2.9%, raising seat load factor by 1.0 percentage points. During the first quarter, the capacity increased  1.2% and the sales volume 3.3%, resulting in a 76.5% seat load factor, and increase of  1.5 percentage points.Lufthansa German Airlines transported 5.2 million passengers in March, a 4.1% increase, compared to the same month last year. 13.7 million passengers flew with Lufthansa German Airlines, thus, 2.8% more than the first quarter last year. March capacity was reduced by a slight 0.1%, while the sales volume was up 2.1%. Furthermore, the seat load factor was up to 78.2%, therefore 1.8 percentage points above the prior-year level. In the first quarter, seat load factor rose 2.0 percentage points, compared to the prior-year period. The capacity decreased 0.8%, while the sales volume was up 1.9%.Point-to-point airlinesThe Lufthansa Group’s point-to-point airlines – Eurowings (including Germanwings) and Brussels Airlines – carried 2.2 million passengers in March. Among this total, 2.0 million passengers were on short-haul flights and 0.2 million flew long-haul. This amounts to an increase of 66.0%, in comparison to the previous year, which alongside organic growth is a result of the inclusion of Brussels Airlines and additional capacity through the wet lease agreement with Air Berlin. In total, 5.5 million passengers were transported in the first quarter. Of these, 5.0 million were on short-haul and 0.6 million on long-haul flights.March capacity was 113% above its prior-year level, while February sales volume was up 109%. The seat load decreased by 1.5 percentage points. The entire first quarter capacity increased  to 112.5% and the sales volume 112.4%. The seat load factor decreased to 0.1 percentage-points compared to the first quarter in the previous year.On short-haul services the point-to-point carriers raised capacity 68.3% and increased sales volume by 64.6%, resulting in a 1.6 percentage points decrease in seat load factor, compared to March 2016. Considering the first quarter, both the capacity and sales volume increased to 68.3% and 69.1%, respectively, resulting in an improved seat load factor by 0.3 percentage points. The seat load factor for the long-haul services decreased 9.8 percentage points, following a 282.7% increase in capacity and a 242.3% rise in sales volume, compared to the previous year. In terms of long-haul services in the first quarter, the total capacity was up to 259% in available seat-kilometer terms and the sales volume was 215.9%, resulting in a11.3 percentage points decrease in seat load factor. Lufthansa GroupSource = Lufthansalast_img read more

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Go live underwater at the Great Barrier Reef

first_imgGreat Barrier Reef AustraliaGo live underwater at the Great Barrier ReefEver wondered what’s floating around in the underwater paradise that is the Great Barrier Reef?Take the plunge on Thursday from anywhere in the world, as Twitter and Periscope launch the Great Barrier Reef Adventure — an underwater live broadcast that will take you on a guided tour of one of the world’s most beautiful and hidden seven natural wonders.There have been countless reports about the state of the Great Barrier Reef, but Twitter will take you beyond this to see for yourself what’s happening and what you can do to help protect the reef.Join Periscope adventurer Mitch Oates (@MitchOates) as he takes the world on two live Periscope broadcasts, featuring marine experts and advocates including Andy Ridley, CEO of Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef and former founder and CEO of Earth hour.Tune in live on 13 July from 11.30am AEST on Twitter AU (@TwitterAU), (@queensland), and Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef (@AndyRidley). The Great Barrier Reef Adventure is made possible by the Telstra mobile network.Broadcast one – 12.30pm AEST- Live reef diveMitch will take a special GoPro and diving mask underwater to show the world the reef like you’ve never seen before! With his specialist scuba mask he will be able to answer questions from viewers, while diving through the coral ecosystem.Broadcast two – 2:30pm AEST – Citizens of the Great Barrier ReefFounder of Earth Hour, Andy Ridley, is now turning his focus to a new movement — Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef, a social movement which aims to unite people from around the world to combat the pressures to the planet’s biodiversity, including how to learn and care about the Great Barrier Reef. Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef will be the enabler and communicator of global and local action for the Great Barrier Reef: providing a platform that allows people, innovators, businesses and communities to connect and mobilise as citizens, working together to secure the future of the reef and our planet.While on the boat out on the reef, Mitch will interview Andy Ridley of Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef about how citizens can protect this stunning natural site for future generations.The Great Barrier Reef Periscope Adventure is supported by Tourism and Events Queensland.“The Great Barrier Reef is a living treasure which is ours to protect and share with visitors from around the world,” said Tourism and Events Queensland CEO Leanne Coddington. “It is our most valuable tourism asset with around two million visitors experiencing it every year.“The Great Barrier Reef continues to offer exceptional visitor experiences and there is so much to see and do along the 2,300km length of the Reef.“The Great Barrier Reef Periscope Adventure will showcase the underwater wonder and allow people to engage with the Reef in an entirely new way thanks to technology.”Twitter is already home to a strong community of marine biologists and reef activists. Twitter Australia Head Suzy Nicoletti said that Twitter really will be the place to find out ‘What’s happening’ when it comes to the Great Barrier Reef, in real-time.“Twitter, like no other platform, has an incredible way of breaking down barriers to participation, and of creating connections between people and places. For this project, the Periscope broadcast becomes a literal underwater periscope, to connect our audience to a truly exotic place.”“The Great Barrier Reef Adventure is just one small way to raise awareness of the reef around the world and inspire everyone, no matter where they are, to preserve this site for future generations to enjoy.”Source = Great Barrier Reef Adventurelast_img read more

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roomsXML on Si – If we can help we will

first_imgroomsXML on Si – “If we can help, we will”As reported in many media outlets, the demise of Si Holidays is having a negative impact on Individual agents, travelers and the perception of the travel industry as a whole.  A lot of hopes and dreams, including those of the people who created Si, are evaporating.roomsXML MD Mark Luckey says “We’ve been contacted by a lot of agents asking if we can help them out. If you booked with Si and have lost your reservation and are going to be financially hurt, be in touch, send through some proof and we will give 10% off our net rates for that item.“Its not a lot, but we will help if we can, even though we will be running those bookings at a loss. If we can help at all, let us know, whether you are an existing customer or not.”When asked why roomsXML would step in , Luckey stated “roomsXML’s customer is the travel agent.  In most cases, travellers will be looking to agents to help and then blame them if help can’t be found. We want agents, the people in the industry to survive and thrive, so if we can help, we will.”On the broader topic of travel companies going bust, Luckey has mixed feelings.  “It’s been a tough few years for a lot of business – look how many franchise groups are collapsing. Every week another historical retailer shuts up shop or has it shut for them.  From clothing retailers to donut’s to fresh food delivery.“Disruption is sweeping change through many industries. I am not going to buy into the TCF/ATAS debate. As far as ATAS goes, we were one of the first wholesalers to sign up and support.“To protect agents, every wholesaler in Australia with over $10m turnover should have to be externally and independently audited.  If a company has directors that have run other businesses into the ground leaving debts, agents should ask why.“Agents need consider all risks, from rates that change with currency fluctuations, the cost of poor service and support through to understanding incentives and points schemes.  There are a lot of smoke and mirrors , but due diligence should help agents find answers. Ask the questions and if the answers don’t stack up, look beyond saving a few bucks on their next booking and think longer term. “We have been externally audited by Standard and Poors and achieved a High credit worthiness rating.  We also have ISO accreditation.  For agents, this says we are an efficient business, we are transparent we are accountable, we can be trusted to deliver when you pay.For agents who would like support with Si bookings , contact roomsXML with details au.support@roomsxml.com roomsXML – More Suppliers, Hot Deals www.roomsxml.com learn more about roomsXML.com here Source = ETB Travel Newslast_img read more

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Emirates Airlines hosts cricket match for travel trade

first_imgEmirates Airlines hosted a two-day cricket match titled ‘Emirates Cricket Trade Tournament 2015′ for travel agents in Mumbai from March 21-22 at the Police Gymkhana Grounds. From the trade, there were 384 players participating in this event that saw 32 teams compete with each other.Emirates Airlines unveiled the cricket trophy in a networking event where the final teams and players were also announced. Essa Sulaiman Ahmad, VP – India and Nepal, Emirates Airline, and Dilip Vengsarkar, former Indian cricketer, who was the guest of honour, unveiled the trophy.According to Ahmad, the objective of organising the tournament is to engage and strengthen relationship with the trade, and cricket is a game that everyone loves and is great fun. He thanked all the sponsors for their hearty support and said that his team had done a great job in putting together the tournament. Abacus India, Dubai’s Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing (DTCM) India office, Star Cruises, Starwood Hotels & Resorts, Akquasun Group, VFS Global, Fans on Stands as sponsors, and a host of other companies, and the two associations – TAAI and TAFI have supported the tournament.last_img read more

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Exploring the capital of French Riviera Nice

first_imgNice is the capital of the French Riviera, which skirts the pebbly shores of the Baie des Anges. The city is the perfect balance of old-world decadence with modern urban energy. With vibrant markets and diverse restaurants, it’s renowned for its food.Source: Expedialast_img

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Virgin Atlantic offers accessible entertainment for visually impaired

first_imgIn a first, Virgin Atlantic has announced a fully accessible in-flight entertainment system for customers with sight loss via specially adapted iPads. The technology will be offered throughout its fleet serving destinations across North America, the Caribbean, Africa, China, India and the Middle East.Working with UK-based tech company Bluebox viation Systems, the innovative iPad-based the platform was tested by representatives from Guide Dogs for the Blind includes audio descriptions, large type, and consistent layout and controls.Mark Anderson, Executive Vice President-Customer, Virgin Atlantic, commented, “Working with Bluebox viation Systems and Guide Dogs for the Blind we’ve been able to create a world first that ensures customers with sight loss can experience the full range of onboard entertainment including the latest blockbusters, TV shows and albums.”last_img read more

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IndiaBangladesh cruise likely to start from March 2019

first_imgIndia is now gearing up to explore tourism after a successful trial of cargo movement to Bangladesh via the inland waterways protocol route.According to a senior official, a transboundary river cruise operation is expected to start in March next year from Kolkata through Sunderbans to Bangladesh and then to connect the Northeastern destinations by private operators.SVK Reddy, Member, Inland Waterways Authority of India said, “Bilateral secretary-level meetings between India and Bangladesh were held in October. It has been decided that one of the river cruise operators would be starting operations from March 2019 from Kolkata through Sunderbans via the protocol route to Bangladesh and then to Northeast.”He also informed that night navigation facility has been installed up to the Indian border while Bangladesh is expected to do the same.Earlier Abdus Samsah, Bangladesh Shipping Secretary, had said that private players will be allowed to operate river cruise covering about 1,539 km between the two countries.Both sides agreed to allow private operators to run cruise to Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh.Some sources have revealed that Kolkata-based Heritage Cruise which operates Ganga Voyager in India has proposed to run the first vessel on the river route.“We are hopeful of more players showing interest. The route passes through Sunderbans and other scenic areas. It will be a lifetime experience,” added Samsah.Reddy also said, “India has agreed to fund up to 80% of the dredging cost in some identified stretches within Bangladesh in the Indo-Bangla protocol route to make it navigable. Regularly, 15-20 barges carrying fly ash are now heading to Bangladesh and navigation up to the Indian border is smooth.”last_img read more

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Flagstar Announces Executive Leadership Changes

first_img Share In Michigan, “”Flagstar Bancorp, Inc. (FBC)””:https://www.flagstar.com/, and its subsidiary, “”Flagstar Bank (FSB)””:https://www.flagstar.com/ are starting the new year with an executive leadership shakeup. Recent changes included the promotion of Alessandro DiNello to president and chief administrative officer of FSB and Matthew Kerin to president of FSB’s mortgage banking unit.[IMAGE]Previously the EVP of personal financial services for FSB, DiNello’s new role encompasses all banking operations, as well as the bank’s compliance practices. DiNello joined FSB in 1979, and he has served in various senior management positions for the organization, including EVP of retail banking. [COLUMN_BREAK]””I look forward to taking this new position at Flagstar,”” said DiNello. “”Having been a part of this organization for over 30 years, I have never been as excited about our future as I am today. While there is still work to be done to further enhance our risk management and controls, systems and processes, we remain focused on continuing to do so.””Our renewed focus on technology and information, as well as our strong commitment to good governance, will prepare Flagstar, its management and its board for success for years to come,”” DiNello stated.Kerin, who was EVP and managing director of mortgage banking for FSB prior to his promotion, will now assume responsibility for the bank’s mortgage-related functions. Additionally, Kerin will focus on risk management, operational efficiency, and quality control for FSB’s lending operations. “”My team and I, as well as Flagstar’s executive management team and board of directors, are firmly committed to building a sustainable mortgage business with an emphasis on risk management, quality control and operational excellence,”” commented Kerin.””Sandro and Matt are both committed to the continued safety and soundness of Flagstar, with a strong focus on quality, risk management and good governance, and together, we will lead Flagstar into the future,”” concluded Michael Tierney, president and CEO of FBC. in Data, Government, Origination, Secondary Market, Servicing, Technology January 2, 2013 439 Views center_img Agents & Brokers Attorneys & Title Companies Investors Lenders & Servicers Movers & Shakers Processing Service Providers 2013-01-02 Abby Gregory Flagstar Announces Executive Leadership Changeslast_img read more

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Consumer Borrowing Smallest Increase in 6 Years

first_img June 12, 2017 602 Views Recently, the April 2017 Consumer Credit report was released, revealing all of the outstanding credit extended to individuals for household, family, and other personal expenses, excluding loans and real estate for the past month. April marked the smallest increase in consumer borrowing in six years. The Federal Reserve reported total consumer credit rising 2.6 percent, increasing the $8.2 billion in April compared to March’s revised $19.5 billion. According to MarketWatch, economists estimated a $17 billion gain in consumer credit for April.The Consumer Credit Report covers the two main types of credit: revolving and nonrevolving. April showed a slight increase in nonrevolving credit, which is closed-end credit for consumers who will repay on an arranged repayment schedule—mainly for motor vehicle or education loans. This main source of credit growth rose at an annual rate of 2.9 percent, its slowest pace since August 2011.Revolving credit, mostly credit cards secured or unsecured by collateral allowing consumers to borrow a prearranged limit and pay back in one or more installments, increased 1.8 percent in April at an annual rate. This is quite a drop from March’s 6.5 percent increase.According to MarketWatch, two-thirds of U.S. economic growth comes from consumer spending, which was also at a slow start for the year. Consumer spending rose at a 0.6 percent annual rate in the first quarter, which is down from 2016 Q2 growth of 3.5 percent and spurred a Q1 GDP growth rate of 1.2 percent annually.In an effort to help consumers better understand what is going on in consumer credit, this Friday Equifax Investor Relations Doug Brandberg and Jeff Dodge along with Equifax Chief Economist Amy Crews-Cutts will host a live webcast on their Quarterly United States Consumer Credit Trends reports. Cutts will discuss frequently asked questions and show how to best digest the data in the reports.For more information, click here. The Federal Reserve 2017-06-12 Brianna Gilpin Consumer Borrowing: Smallest Increase in 6 Yearscenter_img Share in Daily Dose, Data, Featured, Newslast_img read more

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Angel Oak Deephaven Join Five Star NonQM Lending Council

first_img Share 21 days ago 224 Views in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Origination Non QM Mortgages 2019-07-12 Mike Albanesecenter_img The Five Star Institute has announced the formation of the Non-Prime Lending Council (NLC), which is open to all professionals in the industry.The NLC, including industry leaders Angel Oak Mortgage Solutions and Deephaven Mortgage, was formed to provide professionals with a platform to address and discuss industry challenges, promote growth, and highlight lending practices that are essential to long-term industry success.Other organizations supporting the council are: ACC Mortgage, First Guaranty Mortgage Corporation, SHD Legal Group, P.A., Sprout Mortgage, and Velocity Mortgage Capital.Non-prime loans are made to borrowers who have past credit events, or events such as foreclosures, bankruptcies, short sales, late payments, or collections. Any of these—or a combination of them—could make it difficult for these borrowers to be approved for a home loan.”The formation of the Non-Prime Lending Council is critical to supporting an underserved sector of future homeowners, whose circumstances do not conform to conventional mortgage products,” said Ed Delgado, President & CEO of Five Star Global. “The focus of this association of leaders in the Non-QM market will be ensuring that qualified mortgage applicants have the ability to responsibly access credit.”In May, CoreLogic released its ABX Collateral Performance report, which found that non-QM issuances are expected to rise.“We expect non-QM RMBS issuance to continue to increase in 2019, with the credit quality of the collateral weakening somewhat but remaining overall consistent with the prior year,” Morningstar stated in a release. “Also, we expect the non-QM RMBS transaction structures to evolve as issuers explore ways to optimize funding costs and maximize proceeds from securitization.”The council will be comprised of an Executive Membership group, which will be capped at nine members and there are currently two slots remaining.Professionals can be a General Member, which includes the opportunity to participate in NLC subcommittees, admission for one member of your organization to attend the semiannual NLC member meeting, brand positioning on the NLC website, and select features in the MReport magazine.For more information on membership, please contact Kevin McCrea (kevin.mccrea@thefivestar.com), or call 214.525.6756. Angel Oak, Deephaven Join Five Star Non-QM Lending Councillast_img read more

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December 18 2018

first_imgDecember 18 , 2018 FareShare: Combating food waste at retail is a ben … Demand for ‘imperfect’ produce prompts Oddbox … From the pages of Jim Prevor’s Perishable PunditJohn Bovay has been wowing audiences at The New York Produce Show and Conference for the past two years. He always has a way of researching the hot topics of the day – this year it is Food Waste. We asked Pundit Investigator and Special Projects Editor Mira Slott to find out more:John BovayAssistant Professor andExtension EconomistDept. of Agricultural andResource EconomicsUniversity of ConnecticutQ: At last year’s New York Produce Show, you covered  GMO and Non-GMO Food Labels: Implications Of The New Federal Law For Growers, Marketers, And Consumers. And two years ago, food safety impacts. Now you take a hard and questioning look at calls and mandates for food waste reduction. You certainly don’t shy away from hot topics.Food waste concerns are escalating. Policies to reduce food waste have reached heightened levels on a local, state, national and global scale. It’s not clear what impacts this will have on the produce industry. The economics of food waste seem complicated. We’re excited to learn more about your research to better understand the issues and implications, as well as what actions executives should take….A: What you say is true. Here are some links for more information on USDA, EPA and United Nation food waste reduction policies.https://www.usda.gov/oce/foodwaste/usda_commitments.htmlhttps://academic.oup.com/aepp/article/40/3/402/4566544https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-availability-per-capita-data-system/http://www.fao.org/sustainable-development-goals/indicators/1231/en/The food waste problem has been recognized by scholars for over a century and is gaining tremendous traction in academia as well as popular attention. Yet the magnitude of food waste has never been consistently measured. As a result, one cannot satisfactorily answer the seemingly straightforward question of whether a century’s attention to food waste — or viewed differently, a century of economic growth that has caused changes and shifts in the extent of food waste — has resulted in a more acute or mild problem.We review the economics of food waste, provide historical evidence on the extent of the problem with a focus on the U.S., and we draw conclusions about how various drivers have affected the amount of food waste at various stages of the supply chain over the decades.Based on a draft paper of our ongoing research I’ve been working on for some time, we wanted to review historical evidence on food waste and look at the ways it is measured and estimated over the history of efforts to measure the food waste problem. People have been talking of food waste since the 1800’s, actually, and have been aware of food waste as an economic problem; that not selling or buying food and throwing it away is costly. We’ve been hearing a lot about it recently: There have been more than 4,000 scholarly articles written with food waste in their title just in the past 5 or 6 years.Part of the motivation for this research paper was to take a longer perspective on it and to assess whether this food waste problem has become more of a problem in the past few years, or whether we’re actually doing better, and there’s just sort of a buzz around it now, and we’re hearing so much about it.I don’t know if we’re able to reach conclusions based on the available evidence, because the data is very inconsistent. The methodologies for gathering data, for estimating the amount of food waste and measuring the share of food wasted are unreliable or flawed, so it’s impossible for us to say right now whether the food waste problem has been getting worse or improving over time. But we do have some evidence that production is becoming more efficient and less food is being wasted or lost upstream, but with lower prices and increased income of consumers they are wasting more of it.So, that’s an overview of what we do in this paper.Q: Can you elaborate on why the methodologies are inconsistent or unreliable? Is there even consensus on how to define or classify food waste? Is that where the problem starts?A: One of the main things to keep in mind is the definition of food waste is not even consistent. Food waste is sometimes defined as food that is edible but wasted; sometimes it’s defined as food that’s wasted downstream. In other words, the jargon, or terminology of food waste implies some kind of moral problem — that people have food at their disposal and then they dispose of it.Also, the definition of food itself is difficult to agree upon. People can’t agree for purpose of measuring whether orange peels should count, or avocado pits should be included as food waste. So that’s part of the problem, just this basic definitional concept.Q: You mention the moral aspects connected to food waste. Does that cloud the issues further?A: So that’s not really my focus. I’m an economist, and we try to divorce morals from what we do.Q: That’s an important point.A: But there is this sort of moral connotation of food waste. In fact, in the bible, in John 6:12, after feeding the 5000, Jesus says gather the pieces that are left over, let nothing be wasted.Q: Sorry to sidetrack you into notions of morality, and religious bible passages…A: That’s OK. Professionally, that’s what inspired me to become an economist and to do work that would create policies that would create a better world. The ethics are not something I write about, but it’s something that inspires my career.Q: That’s admirable. So, let’s get back to the science and the expert research you’ve been doing to best inform decisions and solutions on food waste reduction. In a somewhat profound sense, factually-based strategies could also be the most moral too. Just how difficult is it to get those facts?A: There are inconsistencies of estimates of food waste because people define food differently, and waste and loss differently. This makes it really hard to compare say an estimate of food waste generated by collecting garbage from households in the 1980s to a similar study done today. Just because inevitably there are going to be differences in terms of what counts as waste, study to study.That kind of approach is one of the two major approaches to estimating food waste. It’s what we call a “bottom-up” approach, where you’re going and collecting physical evidence on what’s wasted, surveying landfills, surveying trash cans and/or asking people to keep diaries of what they buy and what they eat and throw away.And this will create or give you a sense of the picture of food waste, but because it’s relying on very small samples, how many households is it feasible to sample the garbage of, you’re not going to have very reliable estimates when you talk about the national or global scale of food waste.On the other hand, there are “top-down” approaches, which are based on data of shipments of food, production of food, typically at the national level. These have better coverage but they’re courser because the individual estimates are probably less reliable because of the methodology. There is a lot of assumptions that go into it.For example, the USDA has been putting out periodic estimates of food waste for the last couple of decades. They focus on the retailer and consumer levels that are occasionally making headlines coming from the USDA. I have a lot of respect for the work that they do. I used to work in the same small group of researchers as the people who generate those estimates and reports. The problem is that their task is just really immense, and they’re not able to go in and estimate using real estimation methods on the amount of food wasted on the individual commodities.Q: How do they compensate for this complication?A: They make assumptions. For example, canned peaches, 6 percent of what reaches the retailer doesn’t get sold. Mozzarella cheese, 6 percent of what reaches the retailer doesn’t get sold. This 6 percent is a really common assumption they apply in their analysis and how that drives they’re overall estimates when they apply assumptions like that.Q: That’s a bit disconcerting since those headlines are often taken quite seriously in driving policy…A: All in all, when we ask a question like, “Has the level of food waste risen or decreased in the last 20 years,” and we try to assess it, what we’re left with is an incomplete picture, because all the studies out there that allow us to approximate answers to a question like that are just based on layers and layers of assumptions that are driving whatever changes we might think we’re seeing.And as I said earlier, if you were going to use the more micro-level “bottom-up” approach, you would see too many differences in methodology, more based on definition, as well as possibly people changing their behavior if they know they’re their under study.Q: Can you discuss this phenomenon further?A: For example, if I were to give you instructions to take a picture of your plate of food before and after each meal, you would probably be a lot more conscious of what you put on your plate to be sure you didn’t put too much on your plate.Q: That’s such an interesting point, which could be applied to other studies too… for instance, if you ask people to monitor their produce consumption, they may be apt to eat more fruits and vegetables during that time period. A: One of the studies from the UK found consumers reported 40 percent less food waste when they were asked to report their purchases, and what they ate and what they threw out, as opposed to the observational studies where the surveyors were just surveying the contents of the trashcans.  This is because the people filling out the forms were so conscious of what they were eating and what they were throwing out, it evidently changed what they reported.  Q: I don’t want to interrupt your flow, but do you analyze how these different numbers and messages affect the actions people are taking?A: That’s a good question to segue from here. This paper I’m going to be presenting is the first paper I’ve written on food waste, but I’m looking forward to a couple more research projects that are more about generating original data. One of them is going to involve a series of experiments, possibly with university dining halls, where we present kitchen staff and diners with information about food waste and see what messages are most salient to them, and how we can use messaging to reduce food waste.We’re just in the initial logistical stage right now. We probably won’t be implementing the experiment for another year, but that’s something that I’ve been thinking about a lot.Q: Are you going to be monitoring the food waste, weighing plates…or that’s not what this is?A: That’s the concept. It’s probably not weighing plates but weighing what’s disposed.Q: And is there a reason why you’d be focusing on university dining halls?A: We wouldn’t necessarily be focusing on university dining halls; it’s just that it may be more convenient. For this kind of experiment, we do want to partner with institutions that have more than one kitchen. In order to do an experiment properly, you have to have a sense of what behavior is like without these sorts of intervention. We’ll need to have data on food used and food wasted for a year prior to any intervention. We’ll need to see seasonal patterns. For example, if were using a university dining hall, maybe students eat more at the beginning of the semester or at exam time, and we absolutely have to control for that. We wouldn’t want to collect three months of data in an experiment. We really need to see a whole year’s worth of activity.Q: Any other areas you’ll be delving into?A: Yes, there is, and I’ll only be speaking about this briefly during the presentation. The other area is developing a national estimate of the amount of food wasted on farms, and we would start by focusing on vegetables. Again, like the other aggregate food waste studies, there is very little data out there on farm food waste. There are observational studies and data on dozens of farms, but we’re looking to develop a set of estimates that is much more comprehensive than that.Q: And do you have a hypothesis going into this, key goals in mind?A: Won’t have discreet hypotheses. The first step would just be measurements. Then we would be looking into drivers of food waste as well as implications for market prices, for producers’ profits, of various possible policies for reducing food waste.So, one of the things we’re thinking of, for example, is understanding whether more buyers were willing to buy lower graded produce from vegetable farmers around the country, not just processors but people willing to sell lower graded produce to the fresh market; how would that change market prices, how would that change prices for higher graded produce, how would that change well-being of consumers, particularly the lower income consumers?Q: Then with all those numbers, it also comes down to retailers putting the products on the shelf, and bottom line, the market demand for these lower-grade products. We’ve covered strong retail efforts to merchandise and promote “misfits” and Ugly-fruit type programs in our sister publication PRODUCE BUSINESS.At the same time, there have been mixed sales results at retail, with some retailers including Price Chopper/Market 32 and Hannaford discontinuing their “misfits” produce trials.A: These are some of the questions we’re looking at, and this would be a project that would take several years, first to gather data and then to do the analysis.Q: These research papers you’re doing could be very valuable to the produce industry.A: Thank you. I hope so.Q: So, do you want to give more detail on the economic findings of your research you’ll be presenting, and some of the key takeaways?A: Sure. One of the things I’ll say is that I want to lay the groundwork… why are we interested in food waste. It’s not just about product costs; it’s not just about consumer prices, but also the environment costs. There are estimates that around a quarter of inputs to crop production that are used to produce food are ultimately going to be unused. There are estimates that around two percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions are due to wasted food; not food production in general, but just wasted food.Food in landfills is also an important contributor to greenhouse gas emission. Decomposing food gives off methane, which is much more potent than carbon.Then the other major reason to be interested in food waste, besides the environment, is food security. It’s possible, but not necessarily true, that food waste increases food prices. It’s also possibly true, on the other hand, that food waste reduction regulations could increase food prices. For example, if food producers were forced to pay a tax on food that was wasted, it’s not clear whether that would affect food prices positively or negatively.Food regulations could increase food price, and if food producers are forced to pay taxes on food waste, it is not clear whether that effect will be positive. It would initially push up prices but eventually push down prices.Q:  The produce industry often turns on basic supply/demand fluctuations; how does this fit into the equation?A: If there were a tax on producers who wasted food, this would essentially increase the cost of doing business as a producer or farmer, and this would push up prices and wouldn’t help poor folks that need lower food prices.That’s the basic supply-and-demand story.There are potentially some policies that could reduce food waste and, in so doing, reduce the cost of food for low-income people as well as other consumers.It is not clear requiring anybody to reduce food waste would bring costs down and solve the food security problem.So why we care about food waste is one set of points I’d like to draw out.Then the other thing we need to consider carefully in relation to food waste reduction is whether actions should be taken by individual sellers or growers of food or whether it’s some type of centralized government policy. We need to simply establish whether the benefits from food waste reduction exceed the costs.Q: Essentially a cost/benefit analysis to determine the ideal balance; in other words, a goal of reaching zero food waste may not be advisable, and actually could be detrimental?A: There are economic concepts of optimal levels of pollution, for example, and we can think about socially acceptable amounts of food waste where society’s benefit from a reduction of one pound of food equals society’s cost to reduce food waste by one pound.For example, the EPA and USDA announced a goal of reducing food waste by 50 percent 12 years from now, in 2030.  It’s not clear whether that 50 percent reduction would cost something that is closer to the social optimum or maybe further away.Maybe we’re very close to the socially optimum level already.Certainly, individuals and individual producers are making decisions optimal to them at every moment. So maybe that’s going to get us close to the socially optimal level already. It just so happens that the optimal level may be something like one-third of the food supply, which is the ballpark common knowledge of what the amount of food waste is currently.We don’t know what the optimal level is, and we certainly don’t know whether a 50 percent food waste reduction is closer to the optimum or sensible in terms of costs and benefits.It’s not just the EPA and USDA, it’s also the United Nations. The UN goal is a little different; it just focuses on retail and consumer food waste.  Q: I see what you’re saying, that it’s critical you’re working with the correct numbers before making these sweeping goals…A: That’s right. So, the food and ag organization at the UN is developing a new methodology to better measure food waste, so they can measure their progress in respect to that goal. They need to know what the level of food waste is now, and then assess the progress in respect to that goal.Q: But they don’t know if that’s the right goal, if the premise is correct…A: Exactly. We don’t know whether that goal is economically sensible, whether the benefits exceed the costs.Q: They could reach their goal, and it ends up being a negative, even though it appears virtuous…What are the potential economic costs?A: It could possibly be throwing money at a problem that is not correctly defined…The other thing I’ll say is this: I’m not sure where the UN is on spending money on food waste reduction and measuring it, which is costly.The EPA and USDA have been providing some funding for this. It’s not just a press release. They are funding various activities and initiatives for food waste reduction. They’ve also been funding education programs.Then in addition to that, local governments have in some cases incentivized food waste reduction. Seattle, for example, is now charging its residents for municipal food composting. You’re not allowed to throw out food in your regular waste basket. You have to throw it out in a special bag, and they charge by the bag.Here in Connecticut, certain large commercial food facilities, including most supermarkets, are required to send their waste off to a digester.So, these are all initiatives that are somewhat costly and, at this point, we don’t know whether the benefits are justified based on those costs.Q: Can the same be said regarding supermarket mandates to replace plastic bags with paper ones?A: That’s a really good analogy. I would say municipal or state policies around food waste reduction are analogous to local bans on plastic bags in that it may be a good idea for the environment to reduce use of plastic bags, but we don’t know whether those benefits justify the costs.The other thing I’d like to say, obviously businesses have incentives to not waste food or to sell as much food they acquire as they can. So, regulations around food waste that are targeted at businesses may be inherently overly paternalistic, just because businesses have a case not to waste food, and clearly have incentives not to waste food.Q: What about environmental issues connected to food waste, or costs that are harder to quantify from a business perspective?A: It may be true there are situations where environmental costs are not accounted for by individual businesses that are purchasing in the food chain, so there may be good reasons to put caps or impose fines on food waste, but we just don’t know yet.  Q: So, for this research, are you totally focusing on fresh fruits and vegetables?A: One of the research projects that hopefully is beginning soon will be focusing just on vegetables, but the general work — the research I’ll be presenting at the Show — looks at food waste for all different commodities.Q: Can you point out notable differences between the different commodities?A: There are. Obviously fresh fruits and vegetables are easily spoiled and highly perishable, and grains and cereals are much less easily spoiled. For example, USDA estimates current loss of dairy products from farm to retail is 1.5 percent, whereas for vegetables the loss is somewhere in the 10-30 percent level.At the consumer level, we’re seeing much more waste from the different commodities, but again it’s higher for vegetables than for other things.USDA, says 42 percent of leafy greens and yellow vegetables are wasted by consumers, and 30 percent for most fruit, compared to 23 percent for dairy and meat. And for potatoes, which are not highly perishable, consumers are only wasting 16 percent, that’s according to the USDA.Here’s another example that illustrates the importance of perishability on food waste.  USDA estimates from farm to retail about 5 percent of fresh pineapple is wasted. And consumers waste 37 percent of the fresh pineapple that they buy.Canned pineapple is completely the opposite. For canned pineapple and pineapple juice, USDA is saying about 41 percent is wasted from farm to retail and only 9 or 10 percent is wasted by consumers.Q: Do you see these trends continuing?A: When we’re talking about historical trends in food waste, we see food has become cheaper over the decades no matter what timeframe you look at, when you control for and make adjustment for inflation, there are exceptions, but overall in the aggregate for commodities.At the same time, incomes are rising as a society.   In the U.S. and globally, we have increased demand for food quality. Part of what that means is we’less likely to accept an ugly carrot that is not perfectly straight, or a potato that has spots or milk a few days too old.Some of my colleagues at the University of Georgia have written that food waste is a luxury good, and they find evidence for this, that with rising incomes sometimes people are willing to waste food.It could be with rising incomes and decreasing food prices, the optimal level of food waste, where the costs of reduction equal the benefits from reduction, may be rising.We also have a lot of changes in our culture. People are cooking less at home, eating out more, and it’s not clear how that is affecting food waste. It does mean we are making less frequent trips to the grocery store, and it’s quite possible that fresh vegetables are wilting in the fridge and getting thrown out. Q: Do you think the whole move toward omni-channel retailing and increased purchases online could make a difference?A: I hope so. Other things on the supply chain upstream… we’ve had a lot of advances in technology that have allowed producers to reduce loss. They’re able to harvest more efficiently using machines. They’re growing different cultivars of fruits and vegetables that have enabled them to produce more, part of that is harvesting more of what you plant. So, we’ve seen upstream reductions in food loss.Also, there are innovations that have enabled food sharing. I think we’re going to see a lot more innovation in terms of food waste reduction, facilitating transactions enabling farmers to find buyers for food that previously they would have just plowed back into the soil. I think it’s a really exciting time to be building a business around food-waste reduction.I met a lot of entrepreneurs this summer at a food waste conference, who are doing great things making a profit while insuring food gets used instead of wasted.Q: You mentioned food sharing?A: I have seen an app out there that allows consumers to say, hey I have leftover lasagna, who wants it? There’s an app that a company operates in a few countries in Europe that allows restaurants to advertise the food they have at the end of the day at a discounted price, it’s called Too Good to Go.Q: Is there anything else you think would be important to point out for this preview? A: Another big issue has been date labeling, I won’t get to talk about that at length, but there is a possibility that federal law could start to standardize date labels; it probably will only be for certain products, and not everything in the grocery store. But very likely, there are going to be more uniformed standards for “sell by,” “best by” date labeling on packages, where there is currently a lot of confusion, and what they really mean.   Brad Rickard has done interesting research on this particular issue, and other studies related to the food waste issue, which he’s presented at past New York Produce Shows [Important Research On Food Waste Unveiled At New York Produce Show: Cornell’s Brad Rickard Dives Into The Question Of Whether Zero Food Waste Is Good For Overall Health (Or The Produce Industry]Q: Brad’s research on food waste complements what you’ll be delving into at this year’s Show.A: I’m looking forward to seeing Brad again at the Show.Q: And he will enjoy reconnecting with you as well.  [Editor’s note: Cornell’s Brad Rickard and Karina Gallardo of Washington State University will be presenting a thought-provoking talk as well:Cornell and Washington State University Team Up On New Research Interactive Presentation At New York Produce Show Gives Industry Buyers A Chance To Weigh In On What They Prefer ******There is a semantic problem with this issue. The word “waste” is inherently pejorative. It might make sense to use it in certain contexts, say a child whose “eyes are too big for his stomach” who thus loads up his plate at a buffet with quantities of food that it is highly predictable he won’t be able to eat.We can say that child is “wasting” food. We can say his parents are allowing “waste” by not better controlling their child’s behavior. It is a pejorative term filled with moral opprobrium. It is not a reasonable way of thinking about the food system.Food left in a field because a farmer makes the judgement that it is not profitable to do a fifth picking of pepper, for example, because the cost of resources – to pick, to pack, to cool, to transport, to distribute, to retail, on and on – is not properly seen as waste. It is actually avoiding waste – the waste of all these resources that the market would not be willing to pay for through the sale of these few and small peppers available to be picked in this picked-over field.To focus our attention on “Food Waste” and ignore the waste of all the other inputs involved in producing food is illogical and irresponsible.Even consumer “waste” has more to do with value judgements than optimal national policy. At the Pundit household, we buy loads of fresh foods and, often, throw it out. Why? Because we are fortunate to be able to not tether ourselves to the possibility that the contents of our crisper may go bad.If the children suddenly have to do a play rehearsal or an extra team practice, if they stay late at school for extra help because an extra test has been added to the schedule, if we are invited to a last-minute barbeque at a neighbor or have to make a sudden business trip –we can make the decision to do all these things even though it may mean we throw out some leafy greens!  We could decline these opportunities. The Pundit Grandmother might well have said “ I already made a  salad and defrosted some lamb chops; you can’t go to your friend’s house for dinner tonight” But would that make our lives better? If we decided to forgo the fresh foods we prefer and only buy frozen vegetables, that would reduce our food waste, but at the cost of life less pleasant. Tasmanian researcher investigates delicate balance … You might also be interested in Optimizing sorting tech would grant produce indust … last_img read more

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The Spanish lemon industry is expected to return t

first_img The Spanish lemon industry is expected to return to “normal” crop this coming season, which is forecast to be 14% lower than the record production of the previous campaign.In its first estimate, national grower association Ailimpo predicted total production would reach 1.1m metric tons (MT).The group said the forecast was dependent on water availability in the summer and rains in the autumn.Production of the predominant Fino variety will likely fall by 8% year-on-year to 845,000MT. The industry expects the drop at the end of the season, with the first part of the season remaining steady.Ailimpo said it considered new plantings and current lemon sizing when making the estimate, which it described as optimal given good water availability. Limoneira Company sees drop in revenue, rise in ex … You might also be interested in July 31 , 2019 It added the Fino supply levels would allow Spain to guarantee supply programs.As for the late-season Verna variety, Ailimpo expects a 29% drop to 260,000MT.”The reduction in the crop of Verna lemon, an autochthonous Spanish variety, is a consequence of the resting of the trees after a record production season,” the group said.It added the volumes would cover “a large part of summer 2020 with good quality fruit.”Ailimpo also expects a “good and fair balance of prices” and distribution of economic value throughout the chain.It expects the Spanish lemon sector will be profitable while maintaining commercial competitiveness against the “aggressive supply of lemon from competing third countries such as Turkey or Egypt”.It noted that Turkey will continue to be subject to increased pesticide controls at the European border.center_img Limoneira’s Q1 results hit by lower lemon pricing … Argentine lemon export season delayed significantl … Seedless lemon brand LemonGold launches in South A … last_img read more

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For a limited time travel trade and their family

first_imgFor a limited time, travel trade and their family and friends can enjoy a 20 per cent discount off trips on The Ghan Expedition. From now until 27 June 2018, eligible guests can save more than $700 per person when they book a Gold Twin cabin on selected departures for travel through to the end of June 2018. Agents and their family and friends are encouraged to make their booking now by calling 1800 012 108.Journey Beyond General Manager for National Sales, Deb Falvey, said The Ghan Expedition was an incredible experience with May and June an ideal time to travel.“This is our way of saying ‘thank you’ to our trade colleagues and helping them experience what their clients report as a ‘trip of a lifetime,’’ Ms Falvey said.“The Expedition is a great way to get to Australia’s heart and visit places that might otherwise be inaccessible – and what better way to do it than with a friend or family member?”Travelling from Darwin to Adelaide over three nights and four days, The Ghan Expedition includes Off Train Excursions in Katherine, Alice Springs and Coober Pedy.Guests can choose from a range of experiences such as cruising on Nitmiluk Gorge and seeing ancient Aboriginal art, flying over Uluru or visiting majestic landscapes such as The Breakaways in South Australia.The trip features gourmet food and wine with highlights including an outback BBQ dinner under the stars at the Telegraph Station in Alice Springs and lunch underground in a mine in Coober Pedy. australiadiscountsrailThe Ghantravel tradelast_img read more

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first_img Comments   Share   There was a perception of Matt Leinart during his time inArizona that he didn’t really care about being great, thathe was somewhat lazy and unmotivated. Released by the team just before the 2010 season, Leinartsigned with the Houston Texans — and re-signed with themin the offseason — and is now set to start for the teamin place of the injured Matt Schaub. As a guest on the SiriusXM Blitz, the 28-year-old admitted he had some thingsto learn before he could be successful. D-backs president Derrick Hall: Franchise ‘still focused on Arizona’ Top Stories Nevada officials reach out to D-backs on potential relocationcenter_img Cardinals expect improving Murphy to contribute right away What an MLB source said about the D-backs’ trade haul for Greinke “I was young and I didn’t know how to prepare,” he said.“I’ve always worked hard…I just maybe haven’t shown itin all different ways.”Leinart said getting injured in 2007 forced him to tolearn what he had to do to be a good player in the NFL,and backing up a certain future Hall of Famer wasn’t a badthing, either.“I was very fortunate to learn from Kurt [Warner], to playbehind him and learn from him,” he said. Cardinals fans never really got a chance to see whatLeinart learned in his time with the team, but everyonewill have a chance to finally see what the former HeismanTrophy winner can do. last_img read more

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first_img 0 Comments   Share   Your browser does not support the audio element. Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact And by the way, it’ll be commercial free.You’ll get goosebumps listening to Pasch make the calls.You’ll hear the disbelief as Aaron Rodgers finds Jeff Janis in the end zone on the Packers’ last-chance Hail Mary.“Oh my goodness. It is caught!”You’ll feel the confusion as the game officials are forced to re-flip the overtime coin toss.“What? Oh, my goodness. This is unreal.”You’ll relive Larry Fitzgerald’s 75-yard overtime reception that set up Arizona for a game-winning score.“Fitz is wide open, caught at the 35 nobody’s there! He’s at the 40, at the 50, turns upfield at the 45, at the 40, 35, stiff-arms 30! Twenty-five, 20, Fitz to the nearside 10, to the 5 and tackled there!”And of course …“The Cardinals advance to the NFC Championship game on a shovel pass, of all things, in one of the craziest games ever!” – / 40 Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald (11) celebrates after an NFL divisional playoff football game against the Green Bay Packers, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016, in Glendale, Ariz. The Cardinals won 26-20 in overtime. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) Top Stories The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo It’s Championship Week on Arizona Sports 98.7 FM, and as we look forward to the Arizona Cardinals’ NFC Championship showdown with the Carolina Panthers, it’s time to appreciate the path there.To kick off a special week of Cardinals programming on our airwaves, we’re replaying the entirety of Arizona’s thrilling NFC Divisional Round victory against the Green Bay Packers. The call featuring the voice of the Cardinals, Dave Pasch, along with Ron Wolfley and Paul Calvisi providing analysis and updates, will re-air Wednesday from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires LISTEN: Cardinals beat Green Bay Packers in OT: The Montage last_img read more

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