Study questions value of respirator-fit testing

first_imgNov 17, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – A Canadian study raises questions about the value of formal “fit testing” for the respirators worn by healthcare workers to protect them from airborne pathogens, suggesting that it does little good for workers who don’t routinely wear the devices.In the study, 44% of a sample of healthcare workers (HCWs) who lacked experience with respirator-fit testing managed to don the respirators properly, so that they formed a tight seal around the face, before they received any specific instructions.After all the HCWs were trained in how to wear the equipment, testing showed that 74% of them had a good fit. But when the workers were asked to strap on respirators again 3 months later, only about 47% of them achieved a good fit—not significantly more than did so before they were trained.”The utility of fit testing among infrequent users of N95 respirators is questionable,” says the report, written by a team from the University of Alberta and the University of Saskatchewan, with M.C. Lee, MD, as first author. It was published online recently by Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology and is scheduled for the December print edition.In October 2006 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued interim guidance saying that the use of N-95 respirators—designed to stop 95% of small airborne particles—is “prudent” for medical workers providing any direct care for patients ill with confirmed or suspected pandemic influenza and is recommended in caring for those with pneumonia. HHS also said respirator use is prudent for support workers in direct contact with patients. Respirator manufacturers recommend fit testing for the devices.However, Lee and colleagues write that respirator-fit testing is time-consuming and costly, and its long-term effectiveness in a healthcare setting has never been examined. They sought to determine whether an acceptable respirator seal could be achieved without training or fit testing, whether training and fit testing could ensure a good seal during later use, and whether HCWs who use respirators regularly can achieve a good seal more consistently.Success without trainingThe researchers recruited 58 HCWs who had no experience with fit testing. They were first asked to put on a 3M 8210 N-95 respirator without any instruction, after which they underwent a fit test. Of the 43 HCWs who completed the study, 19 (44.2%) passed the fit test. Counting those who later dropped out of the study, 28 of 58 (48%) passed the test.Next, all the volunteers received formal training in donning and adjusting the 8210 respirators, and then underwent another fit test. At that point another 13 workers passed the test, for a total of 32 of 43 (74.4%). Those who couldn’t get an effective seal with the 8210 model were successfully fitted with other 3M respirators—ten with the 8110 model and one with the 9210. After achieving a proper fit, the volunteers were advised to remember which model they used and to choose the same one in the future.The researchers invited the participants back 3 and 14 months after the initial testing and training and repeated the donning and testing steps. At 3 months, 20 of the 43 HCWs (46.5%) passed the test; this increased to 28 of 43 (65.1%) at 14 months. Neither rate was significantly better than the first pretraining rate. Further, neither passing the test the first time nor occasionally using a respirator afterward correlated with passing at 3 or 14 months.If a volunteer chose the wrong respirator at 3 or 14 months, this was recorded as a failed attempt, and he or she was reminded which model had worked for him or her previously. Many of the volunteers could not recall which respirator to use, and many did not seem to recognize that fit is specific to respirator type, the report says.Only a minority of the workers remembered and performed all five prescribed steps in donning a respirator, and fewer than 5% passed all the fit-test challenges, the article says. When the investigators assessed execution of the five steps individually in relation to the overall pass rate, they found evidence that two steps—”correct strapping” and “adjusting bridge of the nose correctly”—were important for achieving a good seal.To assess whether frequent respirator use led to a more consistent fit, the researchers recruited 11 nurses working in a tuberculosis unit, all of whom had been tested before and used respirators daily. The nurses were tested three times at 2-week intervals, with no instruction the first two times. The third time, they were reminded of the standard fit-checking steps.Four of the 11 nurses failed the first two tests; it was determined that all four were using the wrong model of respirator, despite previous fit testing. Two of them had lost significant weight since their earlier fit test. All four subsequently achieved a good fit with other respirator models.The investigators also found that HCWs’ confidence in their ability to pass a fit test did not correlate with actual test results. “HCWs cannot tell with any accuracy whether they have achieved an adequate facial seal after donning their respirator,” they write.Finding the right modelNoting that 48% of the untrained volunteers achieved a good fit with the 8210 respirator the first time, and that this increased to 74% after training, the authors write, “Our data suggest that fit testing may be most useful for the initial screening of people whose facial features preclude the use of the most common types of respirators (which, in our region, was the model 3M 8210 respirator).”They also say their findings “challenge the current strategy for fit testing, which, in our region, is mandated every two years for all HCWs with direct patient care responsibility. Our findings question the need for fit testing of HCWs who utilize respirators on a frequent (ie, daily) basis, because their success rates were very high.”But for workers who seldom use respirators, different strategies may be needed, such as different teaching techniques or reminder sessions two or three times a year, because pass rates of 50% to 75% are “suboptimal,” the article says.The authors say the limitations of their study include its small sample size and the use of qualitative rather than quantitative fit testing. Qualitative fit testing depends on the ability of the wearer to taste or smell a noxious agent and therefore is not foolproof, they note.An infection control expert’s viewEddie Hedrick, MT, emerging infections coordinator for the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, said the study seems to support doubts the infection control community has long had about the worth of fit testing.”I think the study was designed pretty well,” Hedrick said. “The biggest problem, as they say, is the small sample size. It’s hard to translate that and say it’s a definitive study. It creates more questions about the science behind the effectiveness of fit testing.”In the United States, hospitals are generally required to conduct annual respirator-fit testing for all employees who have exposure to airborne pathogens, which usually means anyone who has contact with patients, he said. Although a fit test itself takes only a few minutes, it probably takes a worker an hour or more to go get the test done and return to his or her work area, he added.Hedrick chaired a panel of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) back in 1990 when the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) began moving toward requiring more sophisticated respiratory protection for HCWs. Until that time, workers had relied mostly on simple surgical masks, he said.The effectiveness of fit testing has been questioned for years, Hedrick said. “If I fit-test someone and they go to the floor and don’t use this [respirator] for a long time, and they suddenly get a TB patient and they put it on, if they don’t put it on properly or check it, or if their face is contorted because they’re laughing or smiling, then air goes around it. So the effectiveness has been questioned from day 1. One would think it might be worse sometimes than a surgical mask.”He said fit testing can mislead health workers about their safety. “A lot people when they put them on, they say, ‘Well, I fit-tested it last year, so I’m OK.’ So it’s a false sense of security, and I think this study showed that.”That’s why APIC emphasizes “fit checking,” Hedrick explained. “We’ve always said, make sure when you put it on that it’s molded to your face properly. That’s better than waiting till January and then testing it.”He said it’s important to make a good scientific case for fit testing, just as it is for other healthcare practices.”We like to justify the efficacy of whatever we’re asking people to do,” he said. “If you do that, it’s an easy sell. Just saying, ‘If you don’t do it, OSHA is going to get you,’ isn’t going to help.”Lee MC, Takaya S, Long R, et al. Respirator-fit testing: Does it ensure the protection of healthcare workers against respirable particles carrying pathogens? Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2008 Dec;29(12) (early online publication) [Abstract]See also: Nov 16, 2006, CIDRAP News story “Clinicians raise questions about respirator use in pandemic”Oct 18, 2006, CIDRAP News story “HHS backs respirator use in caring for pandemic flu patients”HHS’s “Interim Guidance on Planning for the Use of Surgical Masks and Respirators in Health Care Settings during an Influenza Pandemic”http://www.pandemicflu.gov/professional/hospital/maskguidancehc.htmllast_img read more

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Richardson eyes up Leeds

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Virus misinformation fuels hatred against India’s Muslims

first_img“My forefathers lived here and I was born here,” Hassan, 55, told AFP by phone from Keorak, their village where a dozen Muslim families live among about 150 Hindu households.”We lived like a family and religion was never an issue here,” the welder said. But now there is “an atmosphere of fear and hate everywhere”.The attack on the Hassan family was just the latest ugly incident in the wake of a torrent of coronavirus misinformation that is stoking hostility towards India’s Muslims.Hindu nationalists are using the coronavirus to foment hatred against Muslims, using online platforms and some mainstream media to accuse them of spreading the disease. Real-world repercussions As the misinformation has exploded, so too has real-world violence and anger against Muslims.Around the country, Muslim truck drivers and nomads have been assaulted, and Muslim vendors pushed, shoved and threatened.In one case confirmed by police, a Facebook video showed a young Muslim man bleeding and pleading as he was beaten with sticks. One attacker is heard demanding: “Who sent you to spread the coronavirus?”The animosity has also taken subtler forms, with “No Muslims” posters appearing in some villages.One hospital said Muslims would not be admitted without a certificate showing they were COVID-negative.India’s 200 million Muslims have long complained of growing hostility under Modi, who came to power almost six years ago.Modi was in charge of the western state of Gujarat when religious riots killed around 1,000 mostly Muslims in 2002.His first term as prime minister saw a rise in “cow vigilantism” — Hindu extremists lynching Muslims accused of eating beef or killing cows, which are sacred to many Hindus, according to activists.His second term last year began with revoking the autonomy of India’s only Muslim-majority state, and new citizenship legislation criticized as discriminatory.In February, Delhi’s worst religious riots in decades left more than 50 dead, two-thirds of them Muslims. A local BJP lawmaker was accused of being a main instigator. Critics partly blame Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who they accuse of seeking to remake India as a Hindu nation, undermining the secular and pluralist roots of the world’s biggest democracy. #CoronaJihad Over the past two months AFP’s fact check team has debunked hundreds of social media posts that falsely targeted Muslims in regards to the coronavirus pandemic in India.Fake and dubious videos have proliferated showing Muslims licking fruit for sale and violating lockdown rules. In one post debunked by AFP, a photo was shared on Facebook and Twitter with a false claim that it showed Indian Muslims flouting social distancing rules by praying on a rooftop. In fact, the photo showed people praying in Dubai.Hundreds of thousands of online posts have also used the hashtag #CoronaJihad, some of which have been shared by members of Modi’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP).The trolls were given extra ammunition when it emerged that a Muslim group, Tabligi Jamaat, ignored coronavirus guidelines with a religious gathering in March in New Delhi.At one point the group was linked to almost one third of India’s coronavirus cases, with around 40,000 people linked to the event or its attendees in quarantine.Newspapers and television channels — as well as the government — have also been accused of stirring tensions, with alarmist anchors calling Tabligi Jamaat members “human bombs”. Gayur Hassan’s Hindu neighbors came at night, throwing stones at his family’s home in a northern Indian village and setting his workshop on fire. All because his son “liked” a social media post.The Facebook post that Hassan’s 19-year-old son endorsed had denounced the targeting of India’s Muslim minority since the nation of 1.3 billion went into a coronavirus lockdown in late March.According to the police who arrested two men, his family was threatened with further retribution unless they shaved off their beards and stopped wearing skull caps. ‘Unity, brotherhood’ Activists say that in recent weeks, with media attention focused on the pandemic, police have stepped up arrests over the unrest, most of them Muslims and some under anti-terror laws.”They are making sure there is no one to raise a voice for the community after the pandemic is over,” K. Rahman Khan, a former minority affairs minister, told AFP.Modi has publicly sought to soothe tensions, calling for “unity and brotherhood”.He tweeted that “COVID-19 does not see race, religion, color, caste, creed, language or borders before striking.”.But Shahid Siddiqui, from the Indian Muslims for Progress and Reforms, a civil society group formed to battle Islamophobia, said the state was involved in stoking the hatred.Muslims were already “maligned and painted as dangerous under systematic propaganda,” Siddiqui told AFP.Coronavirus had added a new dimension, turning Muslims into the new “untouchables”, Siddiqui said, a word usually used to refer to India’s lowest castes.”It [has been] a deliberate attempt by media and the government to divert the attention of the country from the crises and allow hate politics to rule.” Topics :last_img read more

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This modern Queenslander is perfect for entertaining

first_img14 Greycliffe Street, Mount Gravatt EastMrs Fysentzou struggled to settle on her favourite features of the four-bedroom house, explaining she loved “everything”.“We’re sad to let it go. We’ve been there 10 years, so we have lots of good memories in the house. It’s been a great entertaining house,” Mrs Fysentzou said. 14 Greycliffe Street, Mount Gravatt EastWanting to live in a central location, they picked the suburb first, then found the house.Mr Fysentzou is a builder, while Mrs Fysentzou is an interior and colour consultant, so they had everything they needed to transform it into the perfect home.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 202014 Greycliffe Street, Mount Gravatt East“We’re a good little husband-and-wife team,” Mrs Fysentzou said.Their renovations started in 2011 with an extension.They added the now master bedroom with an ensuite and outdoor deck, and also updated the rest of the home to give it a more contemporary style. 14 Greycliffe Street, Mount Gravatt EastTHIS picture-perfect home at Mount Gravatt East was once a renovator’s dream.That was exactly why Christal and Chris Fysentzou snapped up the old Queenslander at 14 Greycliffe St. The couple, who founded Brisbane-based building and renovating company Zou Build, wanted a project for their first home together. 14 Greycliffe Street, Mount Gravatt EastShe said one of the quirkiest features of the house though was the secret storage room or wine cellar, which is hidden by a bookshelf.“We created a bookshelf in the study that leads into the storage room,” she said.“Chris always wanted to have a secret bookshelf door in his house. 14 Greycliffe Street, Mount Gravatt East“He’s very crafty – he likes thinking outside the box (and) he likes putting a little twist on renovations.”The couple have decided to move with their two daughters in search of a new project.last_img read more

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COVID-19 crisis: how technology will help the big players of the industry

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:08Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:08 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow will COVID-19 compare to other market downturns03:08TECHNOLOGY will separate the COVID-19 crisis from previous major events that impacted the real estate market. Ray White Surfers Paradise CEO Andrew Bell, who has weathered four recessions, including the recession with 18 per cent interest rates in the early 1990s, three stock market collapses, the nine-month national pilots’ strike and the global financial crisis is giving a new definition to the term “evolving to meet market conditions”. Home values set to weather coronavirus pandemic Ray White Surfers Paradise CEO Andrew Bell says his agency is always evolving to meet market conditions. Picture: Jerad Williams“It’s in times like these that businesses across the board need to think outside of the box in terms of how to engage with its customers, and that’s no different in the real estate industry,” Mr Bell said.“Given the events of recent weeks and the likelihood that self-isolation is going to increaseas a result of the coronavirus pandemic, we have been working very hard to improve our connectivity without necessarily having to meet face-to-face.“Implementing simple things like inspections via video link, or virtual tours, to providing more data and information to enable clients to make informed decisions, are all practical ways to adapt to the current business environment.” MORE NEWS: Backyard bungalows an ideal escapecenter_img An aerial view of the Surfers Paradise skyline.More from news02:37Gold Coast real estate: Custodian CEO John Fitzgerald urges Australians to buy more property now16 Sep 202002:37How COVID has changed spring buyer wishlists5 Sep 2020Mr Bell said during previous major events his agency was forced to adapt to the climate. But now with so many technological advances, he said it was much easier to stay connected.“Today we benefit from having so many electronic tools at our fingers tips which make day-to-day operations and the ability to overcome these challenges much easier,” he said.“Through our experience working through various global and financial challenges, we are able to help concerned property owners and assist prospective buyers make the right decisions knowing that things will eventually pass and there are incredible opportunities when they do.“This was seen during the GFC when everybody thought the world was collapsing but eventually prices moderated, people kept coming to the Gold Coast and then the supply and demand equation kicked in to the extent that property prices in the last decade have almost doubled.last_img read more

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Ronaldo signs long-term Real deal

first_img Ronaldo was pictured on Real Madrid TV on Sunday signing his new deal, alongside president Florentino Perez, before fronting a press conference at the Bernabeu. The 28-year-old Portuguese forward, whose previous deal had been due to run out in 2015, expressed delight at agreeing terms after speculation in the summer he could be tempted back to Manchester United. Press Association But the possibility of a sensational return to Old Trafford, where he is still appreciated four years after his departure, seems remote after Ronaldo stressed the Spanish capital is where he wants to stay. “I’m really happy here,” he said. “I’ll be here five more years. I just want to win trophies for this club. “I appreciate the fans like me a lot to be here. I’m happy, I want to give my best on the pitch. “I will be honest with you – everyone knows I was in Manchester for six years. Manchester is in the past. “Now my club is Real Madrid. This is my home, my family is here and I’m really happy here. “I respect all the clubs who ask about me. But they always know that my decision, that my only goal is to be here and to play at this club until, maybe, the end of my career. “The future nobody knows.” Ronaldo’s future was called into question following Madrid’s protracted pursuit of fellow winger Gareth Bale in the summer. Cristiano Ronaldo signalled an ambition to finish his career at Real Madrid after signing a new deal that ties him to the club for the next five years. They finally landed their man at the end of the transfer window, for a world-record 100million euros, which meant Ronaldo was no longer the most expensive player in the world. Madrid laid out the red carpet for the Portuguese on Sunday, however, with Perez labelling his new deal as one of the greatest days in the recent history of the club. “It’s a great day for the club,” he said. “We have made the dream of all Madridistas. “Cristiano Ronaldo and Real Madrid will remain forever.” Ronaldo, whose image was emblazoned across the Bernabeu’s VIP Box which staged Sunday’s press conference, was similarly effusive in his thanks to Perez. “For me it is a very important day,” he said. “I want to thank my team-mates, the coach and, above all, the president. With this agreement I am very happy and privileged to continue in this house. “It has given me many things. For me today is as if it were the first day. “I will always give the best for this shirt. Hopefully be here until the end of my career. This club is very big.” Madrid did not release the financial details of Ronaldo’s new contract but reports have suggested it will make him to highest paid player in the world, eclipsing the package Bale put pen to paper on earlier this month. “In life there are things more important than money,” Ronaldo said when asked if his deal was now the most lucrative in world football. “It is important, I am not going to lie, but the project is to win things. “I feel integrated into this project. The issue is not whether I’m the best paid in the world, the second or the third.” The forward also revealed he had told Perez at the end of last season that he would remain and that only the final details of the deal had held up Sunday’s signing. “We had an agreement since the end of the season,” he said. “That has been finalised now because there were some papers to complete. “The president and I gave the word at the end last season. We both wanted to continue at the club.” Ronaldo and Bale played in the same Madrid team for the first time in Saturday night’s 2-2 draw at Villarreal when both players were on target. Bale took 39 minutes to score on his debut before Ronaldo sent Madrid ahead early in the second half, only for Bale’s former Tottenham team-mate Giovani dos Santos to level 20 minutes from the end. last_img read more

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New FL Laws That Take Effect This Summer and Beyond

first_imgA slew of new laws – make that about 200 – take effect in the Sunshine State on July 1, while some are already active, and others remain in the works. Here are some of the highlights:BRIGHT FUTURES (SB 190)The requirements for the “Academic” scholarship, which covers tuition and fees entirely at our state colleges and universities, are about to get tougher. A student’s SAT will have to be closer to 1330 than the current score of 1290. The “Medallion” scholarship,  which covers 75 percent of the costs, would increase from 1170 to 1200.TEXTING AND DRIVING (HB 107)Forget about texting and driving. That will now count as a primary offense.SCHOOLS OF HOPE (SB 7070)This bill will allow charter schools to open near public schools that regularly perform poorly.TESTING FOR TEACHERS (SB 7070)Want to become a teacher? This eases the testing requirements to become certified.PRIVATE SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIPS (SB 7070)Families of four that earn $77,000 or less annually will have access to publicly-funded scholarships for private schools.GARDENING (SB 82)Homeowners will now have the right to grow fruits and vegetables in front yard gardens.CHEAPER DRUGS (HB 19)More affordable drugs that are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration can be imported to our state from Canada and other countries.SANCTUARY CITIES (SB 168)Most provisions of this law which prohibits sanctuary policies for undocumented immigrants go into effect on July 1, while the enforcement portion starts October 1.TOLL ROADS (SB 7068)The SunCoast Parkway will be expanded from Tampa Bay to Georgia, and the Turnpike will connect to the SunCoast in the western part of Florida.AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES (HB 311)This law allows for the development of driverless vehicles in our state.VAPING (SPB 7012)This one bans vaping at indoor workplaces.HEMP (SB 1020)The U.S. Department of Agriculture is ready to implement rules to govern the growth, use and sale of hemp in our state. It would also regulate CBD products here. LAWS ALREADY IN EFFECT:ANTI-SEMITISM (HB 741)Florida’s schools and colleges are now required to treat allegations of anti-Semitism just as they handle racism.SCHOOL GUARDIANS (SB 7030)Trained teachers in certain Florida districts may now volunteer to carry a weapon.MEDICAL WEED (HB 7015/SB 182)This law, which Governor DeSantis signed in March, repealed a ban on smokeable medical marijuana.BACK-TO-SCHOOL SALES TAX (HB 7123)Pay no sales tax on back-to-school items from August 2 through 6. That includes clothes that cost $60 or less, school supplies of $15 or less, and computers costing $1,000 or less. POTENTIAL LAW:AMENDMENT 4 (HB 7089/SB 7086/SB 7066)This law restores voting rights for felons in Florida, while it requires them to pay restitution, fine and fees before registering. Although it was set to take effect on July 1, it remains in limbo between the State House and Senate regarding logistics.center_img LAWS TAKING EFFECT IN OCTOBER:SEX DOLLS (B 160)This new law will prohibit the sale or possession of sex dolls that look like children.DOGS AND HORSES (SB 96)Anyone who injures or kills first responders’ dogs or horses could serve up to 15 years in prison, up from five years.last_img read more

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Madrid, Barcelona Re-enact Rivalry with Football Academy

first_imgNo rivalry in world football has matched that between Real Madrid and Barcelona–from political and  ideological differences to signing the biggest players in the world and most recently, siting football academies in Nigeria A fter Barcelona’s experience with FCBESCOLA in Lagos last February, Spanish giants, Real Madrid, and the government of Rivers State recently signed an agreement to set up an academy in Port Harcourt, Rivers State.On Monday, Governor of Rivers State, Nyesom Wike, Rivers State Commissioner for Sports, Boma Iyaye, former Super Eagles player, Adokiye Amiesimaka and the Majority Leader of the Rivers State House of Assembly Chief Evans Bipi  took a trip to Spain to sign the terms and conditions of the proposed Real Madrid Academy that would nurture talents in Rivers State. Wike toured training facilities of Real Madrid Football Club and met with officials of the club,  football megastar, Cristano Ronaldo  and Real Madrid Captain, Sergio Ramos,  where further modalities were discussed.Vice President of Interact Sports, Mr. Kazma and officials of Real Madrid led Wike and his entourage on a guided tour of Real Madrid Training Facility.In a meeting with Real Madrid stars, Ronaldo and Ramos, Wike said that the objective  of setting up  the Real Madrid Academy in Rivers State was to develop stars that would rule the world in the nearest future“We are using football as one of the key empowerment programmes for the next generation.  We want to grow international football stars from a tender age. We will  tap from the experience  and exposure of Real Madrid  and their stars. This  is a project that will revolutionise  football  in Rivers State and Nigeria,” Governor Wike noted.He assured that the academy  to be established  in the state will be of international standards and will take into consideration  the education  of the children.Ronaldo and Ramos lauded Wike’s commitment to the development of the game.According to Iyaye, “this will offer players of the state the opportunity to be spotted by Real Madrid and also to train and understand the ideologies and philosophies of Real Madrid.”Wike on Tuesday met with the leadership of the Real Madrid Foundation as part of the requirements  to establish a Real Madrid Affiliated Football Academy in the state.Officials of the Real Madrid Foundation were led by Managing Director, Julio Gonzalez and International Area Manager, Rosa Roncal Gimenez.The meeting which held behind closed doors at the Real Madrid Foundation Office at the Santiago Bernabéu witnessed both parties concluding discussions on the areas of partnership.In an interview after the meeting, Wike said the deliberation went on satisfactorily, noting that the partnership has reached its highpoint.The governor said the academy would help the state to harness the opportunities  inherent in football as it would empower the upcoming  generation.He said, “This is the concluding part of the process of establishing a Real Madrid Academy in Rivers State.  It is our dream to empower our youths through football. Today, you know that football is big business and one of the ways to improve the economy.“This meeting is the height of our deliberation to get the Academy Started. We are happy that this has gone on satisfactorily.  Rivers youths will reap the benefits of the Academy. “The highpoint of the meeting was the presentation of a special Real Madrid Jersey for Wike by Gonzalez.International Area Manager of Real Madrid Foundation , Rosa Roncal Gimenez, lauded the Governor for the initiative to set up a Real Madrid Academy in Rivers State.No Nigerian player has ever played for Real Madrid senior team. The closest player to doing so was Mutiu Adepoju, who joined Real Madrid in 1988 but never made it to the senior team.Adepoju scored 26 goals in 67 apperance for Real Madrid team B between 1989-1992. Real Madrid are the current La Liga and Champions League champions.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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Syracuse football position battle to watch, No. 5: Rodney Williams vs. Kielan Whitner

first_img Published on July 29, 2016 at 12:36 pm Contact Matt: mcschnei@syr.edu | @matt_schneidman Related Stories Syracuse football preseason storylines, No. 5: Replacing Riley DixonSyracuse football preseason player file No. 6: Steve IshmaelSyracuse football position battle to watch, No. 6: Nickel cornerback Whitner is listed ahead of redshirt sophomore Rodney Williams at strong safety on the post-spring depth chart. Williams started the first five games of the season at free safety, but an injury limited him to just nine games total on the year and 17 tackles. Whitner had an impressive first year, recording 33 total tackles while playing all 12 games.With Cordy owning the free safety starting job over Chauncey Scissum for now, one would assume the tighter battle is at the strong safety spot. Whitner is two inches taller and about 10 pounds heavier than Williams, according to SU’s roster, and was probably SU’s best defensive freshman in an otherwise dismal defensive year.Teams will certainly target Syracuse over the top since that was its primary defensive flaw last year. The Orange’s last line may be more experienced, but they still don’t have any seniors. And the player with the least experience, Whitner, may be asked to make the biggest transition to build off his breakout freshman season. Comments With Syracuse football training camp a few weeks away, The Daily Orange beat writers, Chris Libonati, Jon Mettus and Matt Schneidman, will analyze one of the top 10 preseason storylines, top 10 position battles or reveal one of 10 player files each day. Check out dailyorange.com and follow along here to countdown to camp.Safety might be Syracuse’s deepest position group, a nice luxury for a unit that was anything but luxurious last season.The top two at both free safety and strong safety return, which will benefit a unit headlined by Antwan Cordy that suffered because of inexperience last year. Take Kielan Whitner, whose late-game penalty against South Florida was a turning point in the game, a mistake for which the freshman later apologized on social media. Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Shelton hoping to catapult from strong start

first_imgSophomore cornerback Sojourn Shelton may have been looking forward to the start of the Badgers’ spring football practices the most out of anyone on the 91-man roster. Spring practice, which kicked off March 5, meant winter would finally begin to remove its emphatic grip on the state of Wisconsin, much to the avail of Shelton, a Fort Lauderdale, Fla., native.But spring practices, which will culminate April 12 with the Badgers’ annual Spring Game, aren’t only a sign of warmer weather for Shelton, but more importantly, a chance to improve on an impressive freshman season in which he was named an All-Big Ten honorable mention by the media.Shelton played a large role in the secondary for the Badgers last season as a true freshman; an often unheard of thing under the Badgers’ previous regime. But head coach Gary Andersen and the rest of the Badgers’ coaching staff knew they had something special in Shelton, who came out of Florida as a 4-star recruit and was the 26th-ranked cornerback according to ESPN.Shelton then graduated from high school early, became one of Wisconsin’s early enrollees in January of 2013 and went through last season’s spring practices. It’s something Shelton knew would be beneficial, as it gave him more time to understand the terminology that gets significantly tougher from high school to college and to become acclimated with his new teammates.“The terminology is way different from high school,” Shelton said. “Coming in early, that helped me out a lot. And just being able to grow with the teammates. A lot of guys took me under their wing and I think that was the best part.”The numbers Shelton would put up in his freshman season showed just how beneficial early enrollment was. He started 11 out of 12 games at cornerback and had 30 tackles and four interceptions. Shelton’s presence was felt right off the bat in UW’s opener against UMass when he recorded four tackles and tallied his first interception in his first collegiate game.The impressive first season from Shelton wasn’t surprising to one of the players who took Shelton under his wing, fellow cornerback, Darius Hillary.Hillary knew from day one in spring practices last season that the Badgers had found a special player in Shelton.“I was definitely impressed,” Hillary said. “I knew when he came in early last year that he was going to be a strong player for us. He’s definitely done a great job, and he’s a very good corner. So I’m definitely proud of him and can’t wait to see what he’s going to do this next season.”But Shelton may be his own worst critic. He’ll be the first to tell you that despite what was regarded as a successful season by many, it was the few plays he didn’t make that stick in the back of his mind the most. Shelton doesn’t need any outside motivation to continue to improve, as he holds himself to a higher standard than what he played at last season.“Honestly, I don’t even think last year was a great or a good year,” Shelton said. “I left a lot of plays out there. If you go back to Ohio State, Minnesota, there’s a lot of plays I feel like I could have made to make myself great and to have a good year. But from that you just have to continue to learn on. I expect better things out of myself but I have to continue to work hard and progress.”Working hard and progressing has been Shelton’s aim in this year’s spring practices. Shelton already has the pure talent it takes to play cornerback at the top-tier of college football, but spring practice has allowed him to get a better understanding of where he needs to be, reading defensive schemes and working on the little things, according to cornerbacks coach Ben Strickland.Strickland, a former Badger walk-on, is in his first year as a full-time assistant coach. He spent the last two seasons as a graduate assistant with the Badgers.“I think just for [Shelton] is understanding the little things that are going to put him in better position,” Strickland said. “Formation recognition, understanding splits, where his help is or where it isn’t; just conceptually understanding the structure of the defense to be able to know what he has to defend and what he has to protect.”Shelton, being the tough competitor that he is, is looking to improve on every facet of his game for his sophomore season. After a successful freshman season, coaches oftentimes want to see strong improvement from players in their sophomore season, and Shelton is working on accomplishing that. He’ll be anchoring a Badgers’ secondary that has had a lot of moving parts thus far in spring practices, but he’s been focusing on bettering himself in spring practices, which will translate to the success of the secondary as a whole.“Just being hard on myself. I want to polish up everything,” Shelton said. “Continue to play good man-coverage, play good man-defense, progress my role as a better player, and see where it takes me.”The sky’s the limit for Shelton in his second season in Cardinal and White. Strickland sees his high expectations and Shelton’s competitive nature as a reason for him to progress as a corner, and push his talents to the next level in this upcoming season.“[Shelton] can be his own worst critic, and he needs to be,” Strickland said. “He knows that I’m going to expect a lot out of him. So, he still has a lot of maturing to do in terms of football knowledge. But he’s getting there and he’s competitive so that’s what you’re looking for.”last_img read more

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